Outside of California

On January 3, 2016 · 5 Comments

There was a town in Maryland I spotted named California. I’d known about it for awhile. It always seemed odd to have a town in one state named for another, especially one located an entire continent away. I figured there was a connection and further speculated that it had its roots in the California Gold Rush that captured the imagination of the nation in 1849 and thereafter.

First I needed to examine the etymology of California to understand if the name might have arisen independently. However, nobody was completely sure what influenced the original California name. Most sources tended to speculate that it derived from a romantic novel published in Spain in the early Sixteenth Century, "Las Sergas de Esplandián." The book described a fictional island found east of Asia. Early Spanish explorers, mistaking Mexico’s Baja Peninsula for an island, noticed a similarity and applied California both to the peninsula and to lands farther north. The theory seemed plausible although plenty of other ideas existed too.

The name spread throughout parts of the New World. However, I was interested specifically in places named because of the Gold Rush influence. Therefore I declined to examine places named California in Central and South America. Those would have likely traced back to the Spanish colonial era. I stuck to English-speaking areas.

California, Maryland


Patuxent River
Patuxent River by N8ure Lover on Flickr (cc)

I didn’t resolve the mystery in Maryland completely. Indeed, the California (map) in St. Mary’s County was named for the west coast state of the same name. However I never discovered what year that happened. I also learned that this once sleepy hamlet had been growing rapidly in recent years due to its proximity to adjacent Naval Air Station Patuxent River while also becoming popular with commuters to Washington, DC. It experienced an explosive 25% population growth in the previous decade, now approaching twelve thousand residents. That recent surge probably made it the largest U.S. California outside of the state of California.

This same general area made an appearance in Twelve Mile Circle about three years ago in Three Notches for an entirely different reason.


California, Pennsylvania


California University of PA
California University of PA by Jon Dawson on Flickr (cc)

The California in Pennsylvania (map) sparked similar déjà vu. I knew I’d encountered the place previously. Sure enough, the university located in town — California University of Pennsylvania — appeared in a 12MC article called Résumé Bait and Switch a couple of years ago. I’d even speculated on the potential Gold Rush nature of its name. The conjecture was well founded since the borough of California confirmed it:

California Borough is a community of approximately 5200 people that covers nearly 13 square miles of land. California was founded in 1849 and incorporated as a Borough in 1853. It is named after the state of California because the town’s founding coincided with the California Gold Rush of 1849. Naming the town after the state was meant to symbolize our town’s future growth and prosperity.

That seemed pretty definitive.


California, Missouri


California, Missouri 65618
California, Missouri 65618 by Jimmy Emerson, DVM on Flickr (cc)

The third largest non-California California seemed to be a town so named in Missouri (map). It also had the distinction of being the seat of local government for Moniteau County. This California was named for its west coast cousin although I’d have to call it a near-miss on the Gold Rush connection. It actually predated the Gold Rush by a couple of years.

California, county seat of Moniteau county, …was first called Boonsborough but by act January 25, 1847, changed to California. The new country on the Pacific Coast was just then attracting attention and the overland railroad was being agitated and during this agitation the name was given for the state of California

The name change may have had something to do with a Post Office issue; the original name already having been applied to another Missouri town.


California, Cincinnati, Ohio


California, Ohio
California, Ohio by Henryr10 on Flickr (cc)

Most of the other towns of California were nothing more than flyspecks. There was one former town however, now a neighborhood within Cincinnati, that seemed to have some significance (map). The village claimed a Gold Rush derivation, albeit indirectly.

In the year of the Gold Rush, three friends… shook off the desire to become gold miners and decided instead to make money in an "easier" way. Their idea was to lay off a town that would become one of the greatest industrial cities along the Ohio River… Unfortunately, their dreams were never fully realized and California was to remain a small rivertown until it was later annexed by Cincinnati in 1909.

California eventually packed a lot of activities within its tiny neighborhood boundaries including a golf course, a nature preserve and an amusement park. It was also the city of Cincinnati’s southernmost point.


Farther Afield


Bendigo Miners' statue
Bendigo Miners' statue by Tim Gillin on Flickr (cc)

I did discover a couple of California place names in English-speaking countries outside of the United States with potential Gold Rush connections. The larger was California Gulley (map), a suburb near Bendigo in Victoria, Australia. Bindigo was noted for its goldfield.

People came from across the world to seek their fortune in Bendigo in the mid to late 1800’s. Alluvial gold was discovered along the banks of the Bendigo Creek in 1851 and resulted in a major gold rush… In Christmas 1851 there were 800 people on the field and by the following June, 20,000 diggers had arrived in the alluvial field. Alluvial gold production was dominant in the first ten years of the field to 1860 and is estimated to account for up to four million ounces or almost one fifth of the total gold won from the Bendigo goldfield.

It didn’t seem surprising that an area on the outskirts of Bendigo came to be known as California Gully given the timing of the Bendigo Gold Rush, just a couple of years after the similar rush in the United States.

There was also a California in England, an area within Derby (map) in Derbyshire. The etymology was unclear although speculation existed that it may have had ties somehow to the California Gold Rush.

My search showed that many California place names did seem draw their influence from the state of California in the United States. Connections to the Gold Rush often existed, although not ubiquitously.

On January 3, 2016 · 5 Comments

5 Responses to “Outside of California”

  1. Rhodent says:

    A little over a year ago I made some GeoGuessr puzzles where the theme was places with this sort of name. I would string them together into what I called “Geographic Matryoshkas”, although I didn’t stick to the idea that the city name had to be the name of another state (it could be a Canadian province, English county, or even a country). I created three quizzes with the “Geographic Matryoshkas” theme:

    Geographic Matryoshkas I: Maryland (neighborhood), London; London, Ontario; Ontario, New York; New York, Texas; Texas, Queensland

    Geographic Matryoshkas II: Oklahoma, Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania, Devon (UK); Devon, Alberta; Alberta, Virginia; Virginia, Cavan (Ireland)

    Geographic Matryoshkas III: Granada, Colorado; Colorado, Brazil; Brazil, Indiana; Indiana, Peru; Peru, Nebraska

    I’d be curious to know what would the longest string one could come up with if one did restrict it to using cities whose names were that of American states. If there are a lot of cities in Washington state named after other states, then there’s probably be a lot of bouncing back and forth given how many states have a city called Washington.

  2. Glenn says:

    A little different, but maybe worth its own post: Houston, the county seat of Texas County, Missouri.

  3. Mark says:

    There is also a California in Ipswich UK, it was the area where I first went to school (moved away at aged 8). https://www.google.com/maps/place/California,+Ipswich,+Suffolk+IP4,+UK/@52.0557064,1.1821912,15z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47d99fa0ddb66feb:0xd9101f377577858f?hl=en

    The local Ipswich town council has a great document detailing the history of the area. The area seems to have been founded in 1849, which provides a hint as to why it got that name!

    https://www.ipswich.gov.uk/sites/www.ipswich.gov.uk/files/California.pdf

  4. Jimmy says:

    There is a California in Kentucky, just south of Cincy.

  5. Jon says:

    To add a more exotic location, there even is a “Kalifornien” in Germany (a name for beach by the Baltic sea, next to “Brazil Beach”) – named after a stranded ship: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sch%C3%B6nberg,_Pl%C3%B6n

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