Simply Boring

On July 9, 2017 · Comments Off on Simply Boring

Speaking of boring places, the phenomenon didn’t confine itself exclusively to Oregon. Sure, the largest Boring town existed just outside of Portland. However, because Boring was also a surname, it spread to other locations as one might expect. Residents tended to have the same sense of humor about living in Boring places everywhere. The same bad puns, the same entertainingly-named public institutions and businesses, the same frequently-photographed road signs formed a common bond. The repetition became, well, boring. Fortunately the stories found just below the surface offered better entertainment.

Boring, Maryland


This church is BORING
This church is BORING. Photo by Payton Chung on Flickr (cc)

What Maryland’s Boring lacked in population it gained in recognition through the U.S. Postal Service (map). Boring, Maryland 21020 didn’t have the same cachet as Beverly Hills 90210, although it still existed as a physical place. Other than that, the hamlet consisted primarily of a few homes along the intersection of Old Hanover and Pleasant Grove Roads. The Boring Post Office along with a Boring Fire Hall and a Boring Methodist Church also offered popular photo opportunities to outsiders passing through.

The Washington Post featured a Boring article back in 1984.

The origin of its name is somewhat less boring than the name itself. The town originally was called Fairview, but according to folks hereabouts, when the post office was established in 1880, postal authorities ordered the town renamed, apparently to avoid confusion with all the other Fairviews in the United States. "So it was named by the townspeople after the first postmaster here, David J. Boring, in 1880," explained Cullison, himself a postmaster of Boring from 1950 to 1976.

It served as yet another example of a town changing its name because of the railroads, a common condition in the late 19th Century. We’ve seen that happen many times on Twelve Mile Circle although the results were not usually so Boring.


Boring, Tennessee



Boring, Tennessee

I found very little information about Boring, Tennessee. It registered a level of boring so extreme that nobody bothered to publicize it. Actually, I shouldn’t say that. I’m sure people who lived there liked it just fine. It didn’t even make the list of Top 10 most boring places in Tennessee. That honor went to Forest Hills near Nashville. I don’t know why. Maybe Boring’s placement at the end of a runway at Tri-Cities Airport made the difference. Jet traffic wouldn’t be boring; more annoying than anything, really.

The author of Tennessee Place-names pretty much phoned it in when explaining Boring.

Boring Sullivan County. The only individual with the Boring surname who could be placed in this locality was Elizabeth Boring, in 1870. She was 46 years of age at the time. Possibly she, or her family, gave this place its name.

Way to go out on a limb.


King Boring Park and Field


dearborn, mi
dearborn, mi. Photo by Heather Phillips on Flickr (cc)

Honestly I didn’t expect to find anything on King Boring Park. I spotted the name and fell in love with it. What could be better than King Boring? Truly, the King of Boring (let’s pause and savor that for a moment).

A Yelp page, yes a Yelp page of all things, offered an explanation. The great-grandson of King Boring — King Boring was an actual person — provided a fairly complete biography. I assumed a level of accuracy. Who would make up something about an obscure ball field (map) in Dearborn, Michigan? It could be fake. Who knows? Let’s assume it’s real and move along.

Apparently Mr. Boring earned the nickname King as a child after he beat-up a bully. Later he legally changed his actual name to King Boring. He owned a basketball team called the Detroit Gems and later sold it. The new owners moved the team to Minneapolis and changed the name to the Lakers. That team eventually became the Los Angeles Lakers. Right, those Lakers. Boring also coached a Single-A baseball team in Dearborn and participated in lots of other local sports-related stuff. He died in 1996.

I found some corroborating evidence. The Gems played only a single season, posting a 4-40 record before King Boring and his partner sold the team in 1947. Oof! He later lamented that he should have retained a percentage instead of selling it outright.


Boring Homestead, South Australia


Wog Palace Road
Boring Homestead
via Google Maps

Why should the United States get all the boring places? I turned to the Gazetteer of Australian Place Names and found the Boring Homestead in South Australia (map). It sat about 550 kilometres (340 miles) due north of Adelaide. I wouldn’t expect to find any additional information about a single homestead, and I didn’t. However, I noticed the name of the road — a dirt track really — that led to the structure. Google called it Wog Palace Road, which seemed really odd. It seemed even stranger when I checked its etymology. I found an enlightening entry in Global English Slang: Methodologies and Perspectives.

In the 1950’s and 1960’s in Australia wog came to be used to describe migrants of southern European origin, especially those from Italy or Greece. Later, the usage expanded to include migrants of Middle Eastern origin…a wog mansion or wog palace is a large and vulgar house, often using southern European architectural features such as elaborate columns.

The word wog didn’t mean anything to me. However, and apparently, it could be considered offensive in Australia and perhaps even more so in the UK. For that, I apologize in advance, especially to 12MC’s Australian and UK audience. I didn’t mean to be insensitive. A wog palace would be like a McMansion in the United States with an added twist of racial spite thrown in for good measure.

I took an actual screen print of the homestead and street name which I’ve reproduced above. That’s because I expected it will be changed or removed someday. I wondered if that was really its name or if a vandal placed it there as digital graffiti, expecting nobody to find it.

Boring, Dull and Bland

On July 6, 2017 · 3 Comments

Boring, Dull and Bland didn’t describe Twelve Mile Circle or my social life although maybe observers would disagree. It referenced a unique relationship between three very special communities. A Scottish bicyclist took a scenic ride through Clackamas County, Oregon just outside of Portland. She passed through the unincorporated community of Boring and thought it should be twinned with Dull in her native land. The two communities agreed and formed "A Pair for the Ages" in 2012. Not wanting to be left behind, Bland Shire in Australia petitioned to join the arrangement. The triad created a "League of Extraordinary Communities" in 2014.

This would have been wonderful for 12MC’s Better Sister Cities list. Too bad I wrote it before the trio got together. Nonetheless, they should still get some credit for their creativity and marketing savvy.


Boring, Oregon, USA


Boring Oregon
Boring Oregon. Photo by Jeff Hitchcock on Flickr (cc)

More people lived in Boring (map) than the other two, with a population approaching eight thousand. The Boring part came from its namesake, William Boring, a Civil War veteran who moved there in the 1870’s. Residents took a lighthearted approach to their settlement’s name. They proclaimed it to be "the most existing place to see" and "an exiting place to call home." One local business called itself The Not So Boring Bar and Grill. They were already predisposed to use their name creatively when Dull came calling.

According to the Boring Community Planning Organization, a 2013 Oregon law legitimized the relationship with Dull. It said "every August 9th will be Boring & Dull Day." I couldn’t determine why August 9 seemed particularly suitable although they chose it so it must have had some special meaning. Boring & Dull Day offered a chance to "join your Boring neighbors" at Boring Station Trailhead Park for an evening of music and ice cream. Feel free to stop by if you’re in the area. Mark your calendar. You won’t be bored.


Dull, Perth and Kinross, Scotland


Dull, Perth and Kinross, Scotland
Dull, Perth and Kinross, Scotland
via Google Street View, August 2016

Dull barely existed (map), a few houses scattered along an unnamed single-track lane. Maybe eighty people lived there. Nobody knew for certain how Dull got its name either. It might have derived from Gaelic or Pictish for meadow or field. The Dull and Boring Facebook Page included an old article recounting the aftermath of the death of St. Adamnan in 704:

… as he lay dying in his cell at Milton Eonan he told his men to place his body upon a stretcher whose poles were to be held in place by loops made of whithies or duls. They were to bury him where the first dul broke. This happened on the hill near his monastery, and there they buried him and called the place Dull

Regardless of origin, the name went way back into the Middle Ages. Dull covered a much larger territory back then, with a monastery and a parish, becoming just a fragment of its former self in recent centuries. Dull hoped that tourists would visit their hamlet once it paired with Boring. Indeed, sightseers started arriving to photograph a sign noting the special relationship.


Bland Shire, New South Wales, Australia


Globe Hotel, West Wyalong
Globe Hotel, West Wyalong. Photo by Matt on Flickr (cc)

Bland (map), a shire in New South Wales, learned of Boring and Dull through media reports. The mayor reached-out to the two. Later the Bland Shire Council in West Wyalong endorsed the partnership. However, it wasn’t completely without controversy. Some of the six thousand residents felt it disrespected the Bland name. The namesake, William Bland, came to Australia after a murder conviction. He killed a man in Bombay, India in a pistol feud in 1813. That hardly seemed bland so maybe those doubters had a point.

Boring, Dull and Bland. What a great combination. I can hardly wait to see what other places will join the League of Extraordinary Communities. One of the several Polish villages called Łazy, perhaps? Maybe Quiet Dell, West Virginia? How about Sleepy Eye, Minnesota?

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12 Mile Circle:
An Appreciation of Unusual Places
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