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_________________________ Tom Howder _________________________

THIS FILE IS FOR GENEALOGICAL PURPOSES ONLY

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The Sylvester Family of Plainview, Minnesota

- a collection of information taken from the Plainview News, other newspapers,letters, and diaries beginning in 1884

Compiled by
Ron Manzow
2001

Plainview Area History Center
40 4th St. S.W.
Plainview, MN 55964


NOTE

Note from Ron Manzow, December 2001: "Feel free to reproduce the pages for anyone who wants a copy. It was compiled to be shared... All I ask is that they consider sending a check to the History Center to help us out. That should be enough."


FOREWORD

In this collection of information on the Sylvester family, many sources have been taken into account. The main source was the PLAINVIEW NEWS, which was the local newspaper of the time. It is from this document that most of the information in this collection was taken.

Another source, the George Dickman Diary, added a scope to the Sylvester daily life from the period of 1901 through 1912. The Dickman family lived just north of the E.L. Sylvester home on the other side of Broadway. Mr. Dickman ran the men’s clothing store and was active in many community affairs. His family consisted of his wife Emma, sons Franklin & Alvin, and daughters Vera & Leona. The Dickman & Sylvester families frequented many of the same social circles.

Byrl Sylvester’s personal letters from his war correspondence were discovered several years ago in a trunk in the Twin Cities. It is thought that they were from the Nettie Sylvester Caldwell household. These original letters were inserted on the dates they were written. Many of these letters were printed in the Plainview News (edited versions.). If you prefer to read these letters in a sequence when they were published rather than when they were written, the dates of the letters were noted to allow you to do so.

Newspaper clipping from Rochester and Winona papers of the Sylvester Bank Scandal were among other items in the trunk found in the Twin Cities. When they were included in this collection they were noted as to distinguish them from PLAINVIEW NEWS items.

This project could go on forever. I have the prison records of the years E.L. Sylvester spent in Stillwater. This includes all the correspondence written to the warden concerning him as well as visitors and a record of all letters received by E.L. Someday I hope to add them to this collection.

I’ve attempted to include a chart of family births and deaths. It is incomplete at this time. Perhaps it will be a catalyst for a more complete listing in the future.

For now, the time has come for me to halt this project. I hope it can be used by others to enjoy an unusual family saga. For me it has been an interesting search and I have enjoyed every moment. I hope it will serve as a valuable resource in the coming years.

Ron Manzow

November 2001

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PAGE 1

The Sylvester Family

-from the PLAINVIEW NEWS
and other sources

=== [ 1882 ] ===

June 10, 1882- Edwin Sylvester has been engaged to take the positioning the Plainview Bank vacated by Louis Champine’s removal to Fargo. He entered upon his duties last Monday. (NOTE: The Plainview Bank at this time was a wooden structure located on the NW corner of Broadway and Washington Street. It was the original Ozias Wilcox store built in 1856 as one of the first buildings build in Centerville, later renamed Plainview.)

July 15, 1882- Report of Woodland School for term closing July 7. 31 enrolled. Average attendance 24. Top ten listed. 2. Electa Sylvester 97. (NOTE: The Woodland School was located near the George W. Sylvester farm where the children attended. It later burned and was replaced by another school located near the Woodland Cemetery in Plainview Township.)

September 9, 1882- Frank Sylvester has gone to Madison, Wisconsin to learn telegraphy.

=== [ 1883 ] ===

May 26, 1883- Report of the Woodland School for the month ending May 18, 1883. Number enrolled 27: Average attendance 23.
Names of scholars neither absent or tardy: Electa Sylvester, Nellie Sylvester
Eva M. Evans, teacher.

July 21, 1883- Report of Woodland School for the month ending July 13, 1883. Number enrolled 20. Names of scholars not absent: Electa Sylvester, Nellie Sylvester. Scholars whose average in deportment and studies was over 80- Nellie Sylvester 95; Electa Sylvester 91 2/5. Not absent or tardy for the term. Nellie Sylvester.
Eva M. Evans, teacher.

July 28, 1883- E. Sylvester -$3.00 for Elgin Disaster fund. (NOTE: A cyclone had hit the community of Elgin and a relief fund was set up to help the victims.)
Mr. R.W. Chapman and family who number among the principle sufferers from the late storm in Elgin, have concluded to remove to Plainview. (NOTE[*]: This is Hettie [Dillon] Sylvester’s family who later marries Edwin Sylvester).

September 29, 1883- A good span of work horses for sale. Enquire of E.L. Sylvester at the Plainview Bank.

November 10, 1883- Mrs. Sylvester, mother of Ed. Sylvester, book keeper in the Plainview Bank, has moved into town, occupying Mrs. Stone’s residence. (NOTE: The location of this site is unknown.)

December 1, 1883- Miss Hattie Sylvester started for St. Joseph, (NOTE: Minnesota) last Tuesday, to visit her brother, Frank, intending to be gone a week or 10 days.

=== [ 1884 ] ===

January 19, 1884- Miss Hattie Sylvester is visiting friends in Rochester.

May 10, 1884- Contributors to buy new instruments for the Plainview Band- E.L. Sylvester.

August 16, 1884- Frank Sylvester, formerly of this place, but now of St. Joseph,

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PAGE 2

Minnesota, is in town visiting his folks.

December 6, 1884- There will be a musical and literary entertainment followed by an antiquarian supper at School House Hall next Wednesday evening at 7:30 o’clock. The following program… Reading Miss Hattie Dillon.
"In the dining room the lady waiters will appear in antiquarian costume. Admission 10 cents, supper 25 cents."
The WCTU will meet with Mrs. Sylvester Thursday December 11th at 3 PM.

December 27, 1884- List of Plainview Bachelors- Ed Sylvester- "A fish well worth catching, but should not be allowed to play with the hook. As soon as he begins to nibble, just haul him right in."

=== [ 1885 ] ===

January 17, 1885- Married at the residence of the bride’s mother, Thursday evening January 20th by Rev. J.W. Raveill, Miss Hattie M. Sylvester to Mr. A.P. Stafford, both of this village.

January 24, 1885- An error type last week made in saying that Mr. Stafford was married on the 20th instead of the 15th, but should have been.
A.P. Stafford sings in male quartet at Entertainment at M.E. Church.
Male Quartet- "Sleep Fairest Sleep" M.D. Taber, A. P. Wadleigh, C.D
Burchard, and A. P. Stafford.

January 31, 1885- The WCTU will meet Thursday February 5 at 3 PM with Mrs. Sylvester.

February 28, 1885- Sale of Plainview Bank by Judge W.E. Wording to J.H. Davis Jr. from Boston Mass. (NOTE: Because of Judge’s advanced age.)

March 7, 1885- Will Farrar, who has been employed as book keeper in the Plainview Bank resigned his position this week.
Ed. Sylvester will retain his position as cashier in the Plainview Bank.

March 28, 1885- Miss Hettie Dillon is now clerking in Frank S. Murphy’s store.

April 25, 1885- At Frank S. Murphy’s a new line of embroideries, napkins, towels, etc. etc., dress goods, and in fact, everything desirable in dry goods, just received and ready for inspection. (NOTE: Frank Murphy’s store opened September 6, 1884 in the Kellom Building at the old McArthur Stand. It is uncertain where this store was located. Somewhere on Broadway.)

May 23, 1885- Play "Blue Gray" presented May 30 June 1 & 2 At the Rink (Note: The Rink was a roller skating rink that was across the street from the Methodist Church. It has been made out of some old lumber sheds and was the largest meeting place in town at that time until the G.A.R. Hall was built in 1890.)
Cast-Vermont- Miss Electa Sylvester
New York- Miss Hettie Dillon
Wisconsin- Miss Nellie Sylvester
Admission 25 cents; reserved 35 cents

June 20, 1885- Dr. Cobb and Frank Sylvester rode to Dover on bicycles, Wednesday (NOTE: This would have been a solid rubber tired bicycle. Pneumatic tires weren’t invented until the mid 1890’s.)

July 25, 1885- Dr. Cobb and Frank Sylvester rode to Rochester on their bicycles Tuesday.

August 17, 1885- There has been considerably many transfers in village property this year… We also learn that stipulations are underway for the transfer of the Dr. Davis residence, at the west end of Broadway to Mrs. Sylvester. (NOTE: This is in block 7- Lots 7&8. The house was removed when the school expanded in 1956.)

September 5, 1885- Frank Sylvester has taken Charley Lawton’s place in the store.

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PAGE 3

Frank Sylvester rode to Mondovi, Wisconsin about 50 miles from here, on his bicycle last week, returning home Wednesday.

October 24, 1885- Miss Hettie Dillon has resumed her former position in Frank S. Murphy’s store.
(NOTE: E.L. Sylvester and Hettie Dillon were married November 22, 1885. There is no account of their marriage because the November 21 & 28th issues were missing.)

December 5, 1885- Mrs. Sylvester’s residence on Broadway is undergoing repairs. Dave Taylor is doing the work.

December 12, 1885- Frank Sylvester is in Oak Park, this state.

=== [ 1886 ] ===

January 2, 1886- The Christmas present offered by Landon & Burchard Drugstore and T.G. Bolton (Drug Store) were satisfactory drawn last Saturday evening. #65 held by Mr. E.L. Sylvester, drew the music box at B.F. Leininger’s.

January 16, 1886- Frank Sylvester returned to Plainview this week, accompanied by his young bride, from Oak Park, this state.

February 13, 1886- Mr. and Mrs. A.E. Sylvester of Waseca, this state, who have been visiting their friends and relatives in Plainview for the past few weeks, returned home Wednesday.

March 13, 1886- Enrolled in State Teachers Institute in Plainview- Electa Sylvester.
Mr. E.L. Sylvester now occupied the residence of Miss Hattie E. Carroll. (NOTE: this was located on Broadway across the street from his mother, Matilda’s house.)

April 3, 1886- A.P. Stafford returned from St. Paul a few days ago, and is now making preparations to remove to Redwood County, where he intends to start a hardware store. Mr. Stafford is a competent workman, and industrious and conscientious citizen and we wish him deserved success.

May 15, 1886- Mrs. Frank Sylvester left town Monday morning for a visit to her old home in Alexandria, this state.

May 29, 1886- Born to Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester, a daughter (NOTE: Nettie.)

June 12, 1886- Graduation exercises at M.E. Church.
Music- "Mouse Trap" Nellie Sylvester and Lutie Meachum.

June 19, 1886- Frank Sylvester left town last week to accept a position as telegraph operated at Foley, this state.

July 3, 1886- Mrs. Sylvester received a telegram from Redwood County announcing the dangerous illness of her daughter, Mrs. Stafford, and left at once to visit her.

July 10, 1886- New bank and jewelry store erected. Bank 20X40 feet. (NOTE: On the corner of Broadway and Washington.)
Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Stafford returned to Plainview this week and will remain here awhile. Mrs. Stafford’s health is somewhat better.

August 7, 1886- Born to Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Stafford a son. (NOTE: Allen.)

November 13, 1886- Mr. J.H. Davis Jr. moved into his new bank building this week…

December 25, 1886- The Literary Society of Plainview High School will give an entertainment and Pink Tea at School Hall December 29, proceeds for benefit of school organ.
Music- Electa Sylvester and Hortence Freer
Recitation- Nellie Sylvester
Reading- Electa Sylvester

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PAGE 4

=== [ 1887 ] ===

May 4, 1887- Graduation Exercises- Congregational Church.
Music "The Mairmaiden Song" Electa Sylvester, Sibyl Champine, and Anna May Evans
Music "Vacation Song" Nellie Sylvester, Grace Darling, Hattie Felton, Lutie Meachum
Music "Where Morning Light is Beaming" Electa Sylvester and Mary Felton

July 2, 1887- Mrs. G.W. Sylvester, accompanied by her two daughters, is visiting her son Frank, who lives in Foley, this state.

September 3, 1887- Convention- members of the Plainview Musical Association… Electa Sylvester, A.P. Stafford, Mrs. A.P. Stafford, Nellie Sylvester.

September 17, 1887- Mrs. Frank Sylvester from Foley, Minnesota is in town on a visit.
A.P. Stafford went to West Liberty, Iowa this week where he intends to work at his trade during the winter.

October 15, 1887- A.P. Stafford, located at West Liberty, Iowa, is spending a few days with his family.

October 27, 1887- A.P. Stafford departed with his family last Thursday for West Liberty, Iowa.

December 17, 1887- Born to Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester, a daughter. (NOTE: Meta.)

=== [ 1888 ] ===

January 21, 1888- The Aid Society of the M.E. Church will meet at Mrs. M.A. Sylvester’s Wednesday afternoon. Supper at 6 o’clock.

February 4, 1888- E.L. Sylvester took in the Carnival and Ice Palace the last of the week.

February 11, 1888- High School Play. "Under the Laurels" Friday and Saturday February 17 & 18.
Cast- Mrs. Milford- Miss Electa Sylvester…

April 14, 1888- The WCTU will meet with Mrs. Sylvester Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

May 26, 1888- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester visited in Elgin this week.

June 9, 1888- Fourth of July Organizations- Committee on Grounds- G.R. Hall, Ed. Sylvester, and G. Pegley.
Graduation at M.E. Church. The class song "Now We Must Leave Thee" also composed by one of the school was rendered by Misses Electa Sylvester and Anna Mae Evans.

June 16, 1888- Play at School Hall July 3-4 Tuesday and Wednesday; "Louva the Pauper" in 5 acts
Mrs. Craft- Miss Electa Sylvester
Aunt Charity- Miss Nellie Sylvester
Admission 35 cents- Children 25 cents.
Mrs. M.A. Sylvester left town last Saturday for Milaca, Minnesota on a visit to her son Frank and his family.

June 30, 1888- Mrs. Sylvester returned from her visit to Milaca this week.

August 11, 1888- Mrs. Sylvester left town the first of this week for Iowa, on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. A.P. Stafford.

September 8, 1888- Born to Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Stafford, a daughter. (NOTE: in A.P. Stafford’s obituary, it listed two daughters- Mrs. B.E. Bullen of Denver, Colorado and Mrs. Willard Hard of Barnard, Kansas. There were no first names listed.) [HOWDER NOTE: This was Clara Matilda Stafford born August 31, 1888, who married Willard Vern Hart]

September 15, 1888- Mrs. M. Sylvester returned from West Liberty, Iowa Wednesday.

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PAGE 5

September 29, 1888- Mrs. M. Sylvester and Miss Lena Haessig visited Rochester last Saturday.

October 13, 1888- The Athenian Society will give the following programs Friday October 19th.
Recitation- Electa Sylvester

November 24, 1888- Frank Sylvester and family are visiting friends and relatives in Plainview. Frank is station agent and telegraph operator at Milaca on the Fergus Falls branch of the St. P. and M. Railroad.

December 1, 1888- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester returned to their home in Milaca Wednesday.

=== [ 1889 ] ===

February 16, 1889- "Odds With the Enemy" Play March 1&2
Lanty Nixon- E.L. Sylvester
Phoebe Day- Miss Nellie Sylvester
Admission 25 cents reserved 35 cents

March 23, 1889- Geo. Wedge having closed the trade with Hon. T.A. Thompson for the place called "Park Home" by trimming up and cutting down trees in and about the yard. The property has been sadly neglected for a number of years and will stand a god deal of such work and every stroke like the painter’s brush, beautifies.
Later- The above property has been resold to E.L. Sylvester, consideration not known. (NOTE: This property is located at 745 W. Broadway.)

July 13, 1889- Mrs. Stafford who has been visiting with her mother and friends here for several weeks left for her home in West Liberty, Iowa Thursday.

July 27, 1889- Mrs. Sylvester accompanied by her daughters Misses Electa and Nellie left home Monday morning for a short visit with her son, Fran, at Milaca this state.

August 17, 1889- Born to Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester a son. (NOTE: Park.)
Mrs. Sylvester and daughters returned home from Milaca Saturday accompanied by Mrs. Frank Sylvester.

August 27, 1889- Mr. Frank Sylvester of Milaca came down Saturday to accompany Miss Sylvester, who has been visiting here some time, home.

October 5, 1889- Mr. William Lawton moves his family back into his own house and Mr. E.L. Sylvester will occupy his own property after this, Park Home, as Mr. T.A. Thompson named it. Ed bought the property last spring bust as it was rented he takes possession now, moves this week.

October 19, 1889- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester visited Elgin Wednesday.

=== [ 1890 ] ===

January 18, 1890- The Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. M.A. Sylvester Wednesday January 22. Quarterly supper will be served at 6 o’clock. All are invited.

January 25, 1890- Old Settlers- Table Committee- Mrs. M.A. Sylvester

April 19, 1890- A.P. Stafford of Atalissa, Iowa was in town most of this week.

April 26, 1890- Mrs. EL. Sylvester visited Rochester Wednesday.

May 10, 1890- A.P. Stafford arrived here with his household goods the first of the week. His family arrived last Friday and for the present will make their home with her mother, Mrs. Sylvester.

June 14, 1890- Graduation exercises at new G.A.R. Hall- 600 people. (NOTE: the G.A.R. Hall was built by Civil War veterans and was located on Broadway on the site of the present Municipal Liquor Store. It was demolished in the 1960’s.)
The program opened with an instrumental solo by Miss Electa Sylvester which

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PAGE 6

being performed very creditably, was duly appreciated.

July 12, 1890- Mrs. M.A. Sylvester, accompanied by her daughter Nellie, is in Milaca visiting her son, Frank Sylvester and family. Miss Electa is at the Teacher’s Association in St. Paul.

July 19, 1890- The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. E.L. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon. Quarterly supper served from 6 to 8 o’clock.

August 30, 1890- Friday September 5th is the day of prayer for God’s blessing on the coming W.C.T.U. State Convention meeting with Mrs. M.A. Sylvester at 3 o’clock.

September 6, 1890- Misses Lula D. Colby, Electa Sylvester, Edna Dawley, graduates of the Plainview High School, went to Winona this week to join a class in the normal school. They expect to study for teachers. The course of training laid out takes about 10 months. This may seem a very long time to these young ladies, but it soon passes away. Then their duties will be before them, and the battle of life will begin.

September 20, 1890- At the W.C.T.U. State Convention at St. Paul this week, Mrs. R.C. Stillman, Mrs. M.A. Sylvester, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Geo. R. Hall and Mrs. H. Suth are attending as delegates from this place.

September 27, 1890- A.P. Stafford has purchased Will Freer’s interest in the hardware store of the late firm of Stafford and Freer. (NOTE: This store was a wooden building on Broadway located where Broadway Video is now located- 316 W. Broadway.).

November 15, 1890- The Misses Belle Wood, Electa Sylvester and Edna Dawley who are attending the Normal at Winona were home Friday and Saturday.

December 13, 1890- Born to Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Stafford on Saturday last, a girl. (NOTE: In A.P. Stafford’s obituary, it listed two daughters- Mrs. B.E. Bullen of Denver, Colorado and Mrs. Willart Hart of Barnard, Kansas. There were no first names listed.) [HOWDER NOTE: This was Frances Mae Stafford born December 6, 1890, who married Benjamin Talmadge Bullen]

December 20, 1890- Misses Belle Wood, Electa Sylvester and Edna Dawley, who are attending the Normal at Winona, came home today to spend the holidays with their parents.

=== [ 1891 ] ===

February 14, 1891- Old Settler’s Day. Current officers… E.L. Sylvester Treasurer reelected.

March 14, 1891- A.P. Stafford has purchased the Adam’s property on Foster’s Addition in south Plainview, consisting of 3 lots on Jefferson and Locust Streets and will put up a dwelling as soon as the weather will permit. (NOTE: This house was just 2 blocks south of the Methodist Church-block #26. It was demolished in the 1990’s and another older home moved on the site.)

April 18, 1891- A.P. Stafford commenced his new house this week.

May 16, 1891- A.P. Stafford has moved his family into his new house.

May 23, 1891- Memorial program at School May 29th at 2 o’clock.
Song- Nellie Sylvester
Song- "Oh Starry Flag" Solo and chorus (Four names listed- Nellie Sylvester.)

June 6, 1891- In attendance at the Sunday School Convention at Lake City from this town… Miss Electa Sylvester.

June 20, 1891- Second annual alumni banquet at the home of Miss Electa Sylvester, class of 1889. 26 members. President- Miss Electa Sylvester. Instrumental duet of a high order "Lustspiel" was well given by the Misses Electa and Nellie Sylvester. Election of officers- Pres. Miss Electa Sylvester, V.P. Miss Amy French, Sec. Miss Hattie Bates, Treas. Miss Lena Underwood.

June 27, 1891- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester and Misses Electa and Nellie Sylvester were visiting friends in Rochester during the week.

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PAGE 7

July 11, 1891- The W.C.T.U. will meet with Mrs. Stafford Thursday afternoon July 16.

September 5, 1891- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester and Miss Electa Sylvester started Monday morning for St. Paul. After a weeks visit in the Twin Cities, Miss Sylvester will go to Farmington where she has a school engaged for the fall term.

October 10, 1891- See Stafford’s folding bath tub. Adv.
The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. A.P. Stafford on Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. M.A. Sylvester started today for a visit to Farmington where her daughter, Electa, is now teaching.

November 14, 1891- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester visited in Elgin Wednesday.

December 19, 1891- Miss Electa Sylvester is expected home this evening.

=== [ 1892 ] ===

January 16, 1892- Old Settler’s Table Committee- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester, Miss Nellie Sylvester

January 30, 1892- A.P. Stafford of whom we spoke last week as having the grip, got better and came out Saturday and Monday, but was taken worse Monday evening and has since been suffering from pneumonia.

February 6, 1892- To the very many who so kindly aided us in various ways during our recent sickness we would express our sincere thanks. Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Stafford.

April 2, 1892- Miss Electa Sylvester spent her vacation week at home. She returned to Farmington Saturday to resume her school.

April 16, 1892- Miss Nellie Sylvester spent part of the week in Farmington the guest of her sister Miss Electa who teaches at that place.

June 4, 1892- A.P. Stafford put up a nice new canvas awning in front of his store this week. Evidently he expects to see the sun again before the year closes.
Class Day exercises- School Hall June 10, 1:30
Class of 6 scholars- Mary Bolton, Carrie Boyd, Nellie Sylvester, Inez Wahler, Fred Huxley, William Weikel Jr.
Class Motto: Accomplish thoroughly or attempt not."
Graduation Exercises at G.A.R. Hall. Packed house.
… "Silent Forces" by Miss Nellie Sylvester was carefully illustrated by comparing the noisy with the silent forces. The loud but harmless thunder to the quite, zig zag, dangerous lightning. The unseen power of gravity that keeps man on earth, that prevents perpetual motion, and that draws the apple to the ground. The bright, invisible air produces effects more stupendous than the fury of the passing hurricane. The powerful work of evaporation and condensation so gently, noiselessly, for the most part so unobserved that comparatively few are aware of the magnitude of these operations. Silent forces continually surround the individual affecting him naturally for weal or for woe. His life and character are molded to a high or low standard according as he does or does not follow the guidances of his better nature. "Silence is the perfect herald of Joy! I were little happy if I could say how much." But there are silent and secret forces interwoven in our natures. In no part of the constitution of the mind is the goodness of the great Designer more manifest than in material love, words cannot tell the numberless, nameless, impassioned sympathies that make the melody of a mother’s tenderness…

June 11, 1892- Miss Nellie Sylvester has a new safety bicycle and rides it nicely. (NOTE: Nellie was the first Plainview woman bicyclist mentioned in the Plainview paper. Perhaps it was a graduation present.)

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July 18, 1892- Miss Etta F. Mullen a teacher in the Farmington Schools is the guest of Miss Electa Sylvester.
Alumni Banquet at Hotel
President Miss Electa Sylvester- Toastmaster. New officers for next year.

July 9, 1892- Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester went to Milaca Saturday.
Although for enterprise and ambition the Plainview girls are noted, especial mention should be made of Miss Electa Sylvester, who has been teaching and during unoccupied moments, she has devoted her time to obtaining subscriptions for the Ladies’ Home Journal, until has nearly 300 secured. The result of this secures to her a paid up tuition and board at the New England Conservatory of Music at Boston for a limited time, where she will enter in September with the determination to graduate and when one so in earnest makes so determined an effort we should help her all we can and feel proud of her as one of "our girls". Let us give her a subscription at least.

July 16, 1892- The M.E. Ladies Aid will hold their quarterly tea with Mrs. E.L. Sylvester on Wednesday July 20th. All are cordially invited.
Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester returned from their pleasure trip up to Duluth, St. Paul and other points north. They report a very pleasant journey and a general good time.

July 23, 1892- Misses Electa and Nellie Sylvester went to Lake City Thursday to recreate and rest a few days. They expect to return Monday.

August 13, 1892- Misses Grace Landon, Nellie Sylvester, Ethel Mae Davey, Hattie Felton, and Luella Meachum hired a livery team and drove over to Rochester (NOTE: a trip of about 25 miles) Wednesday. The day being fine and nothing occurring to mar the pleasure of the journey, they returned very much delighted with the trip as well as the enjoyment of a visit to the asylum.

August 20, 1892- Mrs. Frank Murphy and sister Mrs. Stone of St. Paul, are visiting at E.L. Sylvester’s. Mrs. Stone returned to St. Paul Friday. (Note: Hettie Sylvester worked in Frank Murphy’s store before her marriage.)

September 2, 1892- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester of Milaca spent the week with relatives in town. Before returning home they will take an extended trip West and South.

September 10, 1892- Miss Electa Sylvester and Miss Luella Meachum left Saturday for Boston to attend the Conservatory of Music. F.L. Meachum accompanied them to Chicago, returning Monday noon.

September 17, 1892- Miss Sylvester accompanied by her daughter left for the Cities Saturday. Miss Nellie will attend the Hamline University. Mrs. Sylvester returned Monday.
New safe in the Plainview Bank. 3,300 pounds.

September 24, 1892- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester returned from their trip to California Sunday and returned to their home in Milaca on Wednesday.

October 22, 1892- Mrs. M.A. Sylvester is in Hamline visiting her daughter Nellie.

October 29, 1892- A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester this morning. (NOTE: Byrl).

December 3, 1892- Mrs. M.A. Sylvester, who has been visiting with her son Frank at Milaca for several weeks returned home Wednesday.

=== [ 1893 ] ===

January 21, 1893- Mrs. Sylvester is laid up with a sprained ankle caused by slipping on the sidewalk which had not been properly cleaned off and ice allowed to accumulate.

January 28, 1893- The Misses Electa and Nellie Sylvester, the former of the Boston Conservatory and the latter at Hailer University, were summoned home to attend their

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sister’s funeral. Miss Nellie accompanied by her brother, Frank, of Milaca arrived Thursday night and Miss Electa is expected today.
Death of Mrs. A.P. Stafford
A very sad and untimely death THE NEWS is called upon to record this week, in that of Mrs. Stafford, wife of A.P. Stafford of Plainview’s hardware merchants, who died at her home on Thursday morning at 6:45 o’clock of child-bed spasms. She was taken with a spasm at 5 o’clock Wednesday morning from which time she never regained consciousness but was not relieved of her sufferings until death’s call summoned her to the land where care and endurance are unknown. It was a great shock to her husband, mother, brother & sisters as well as her numberless friends and acquaintances and especially more so on account of life passing away so sudden and not allowing the deceased to bid her fond relatives a last farewell.
Hattie Alice Sylvester was the oldest daughter of Mrs. M.A. Sylvester and was born in Plainview township, in the vicinity known as Woodland, on the 27th of March, 1864, and lived there until her mother moved with her family to this village where she spent the rest of her girlhood days. She made the acquaintance of and in June 1885 was married to Mr. A.P. Stafford who was then and with the exception of about 2 years 1889-1891, has since been a resident of this place. She was the mother of three children who are left to pick their way through the wide and troublesome world without a fond mother’s guide and blessing.
Mrs. Stafford was a devoted Christian woman, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was ever ready to lend a helping hand in church work or other Christian duties. She was very highly respected in this community and will leave a very large circle of friends to sympathize with her bereaved husband, children, and relatives. Funeral services will be held at the M.E. Church at 10:30 o’clock Sunday.
Friends desiring to view the remains will call at home. The casket will not be opened at the church.

February 11, 1893- Miss Nellie Sylvester returned to Hamline Wednesday morning.
Miss Electa Sylvester went back to Boston this week to continue her musical studies in the New England Conservatory.

July 1, 1893- Death of Leon Sylvester, son of Frank Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester, of Milaca are mourners over the tragic death of their 7 year old son, Leon, who was killed by a freight train last Saturday afternoon. The child was killed at 4 o’clock in the afternoon but it was not until 6 o’clock that the body was discovered.
The only eye witness to the scene was a playmate of the same age, either on account of fright or other cause did not report the accident nor mention the matter until questioned about it, and then no satisfactory explanation was obtained. E.L Sylvester was immediately notified of the unfortunate affair and left for his brother’s home Sunday morning, returning Wednesday.
The Milaca Times received today, gives the following explanation.
"The boys were standing, one on each side of the track, on the ramp leading to the bridge when suddenly Leon, either from the dirt beneath his feet slipping, the suction of the train or from the force of the strong wind that was blowing at the time, fell under the wheels and was mangled and crushed beyond recognition."

July 8, 1893- Boy’s bicycles at Stafford’s [Hardware Store].

July 15, 1893- Miss Electa Sylvester, who returned last week from the New England Conservatory of Music at Boston has been offered a responsible position as teacher of music in the state, but she contemplates returning to Boston in September to pursue her studies, believing she will have plenty of positions offered her later on.

September 2, 1893- A.P. Stafford and Miss Hulda Horn were married at the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Horn east of Plainview Wednesday evening at 6:30 by Rev.

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W.M. Gillis. (NOTE: Methodist Minister.) After they had partaken of refreshments, Mr. and Mrs. Stafford repaired to their home in town.

September 9, 1893- Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester and Miss Electa Sylvester left Tuesday for Chicago. After spending a few days at the fair, Miss Electa will return to Boston to resume her studies in the Conservatory of Music. (NOTE: Chicago World’s Fair.)

September 16, 1893- Misses Mary Bolton, Inez Wahler returned to Hamline this week. Miss Nellie Sylvester will go next week.

September 23, 1893- The W.C.T.U. will meet with Mrs. E.L. Sylvester on Friday afternoon September 29 at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester of Milaca stopped off here a couple of days on their return trip from Chicago. They left their home Monday Morning.

October 21, 1893- Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester of Plainview were guests of Prof. and Mrs. J.A. Vandyke on Wednesday. Mr. Sylvester is cashier of the Plainview Bank- Wabasha Herald.

December 23, 1893- Mrs. M.A. Sylvester returned Tuesday from her summers visit to the Cities and at Milaca.
Misses Mary Bolton, Inez Wahler, and Nellie Sylvester came home Tuesday from the Hamline University to spend the holidays with their parents.

=== [ 1894 ] ===

January 6, 1894- At the M.E. Sunday School last Sunday the following officers were elected: Supt.- G.R. Hall, Asst. Supt.- E.L. Sylvester, Sec/Treas- A.P. Stafford…

March 3, 1894- E.L. Sylvester has sold his part of the Clark farm consisting of the south 160 acres to Henry Walch for $4,800.

March 24, 1894- The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. E.L. Sylvester on Wednesday afternoon March 28.

March 31, 1894- Delegates to attend the Epworth League Convention at Rochester this Friday and Saturday… Mrs. E.L. Sylvester…

May 19, 1894- The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. M.A. Sylvester on Wednesday May 23.
Sidewalk notice: M.A. Sylvester Lots 7,8 Block 7.
A.P. Stafford Part of Lots 1,3 Block 26.

June 9, 1894- The Hamline Students Misses Nellie Sylvester, Inez Whaler, and Mary Bolton came down the river from St. Paul to Wabasha by boat today and will reach home tomorrow.

June 16, 1894- Mrs. E.L. Sylvester and sons Park and Byrl left on Tuesday for a short visit with her sister at Baraboo, Wisconsin.

June 30, 1894- Miss Electa Sylvester, who has been attending the Boston Conservatory, returned home today to spend her vacation.

August 25, 1894- Miss Electa Sylvester has been visiting Winona this week.

September 1, 1894- Miss Electa Sylvester leaves today for Mayville, N.D. where she has accepted a position as instructor in music and drawing in the Normal school in that city. (NOTE: Mayville was founded in 1889, located 40 miles north of Fargo, the same year N.D. became the 39th state.)

September 15, 1894- Misses Nellie Sylvester and Inez Wahler leave Monday morning for Hamline to continue their studies at the University.

October 13, 1894- Mrs. Sylvester has gone to Hamline for a short visit with her daughter. She will also visit her son Frank at Milaca.

October 20, 1894- Reception for Rev. Gillis at G.A.R. Hall home. Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester listed as in attendance.

December 22, 1894- E.L. Sylvester was surprised to learn yesterday that a few

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mornings before a party of men were on the premises fighting fire while he was peacefully sleeping. On that morning the strong south wind blew a spark from the engine into the straw pile which stands near the barn, and the train was passing but fortunately the spark lit on the north side of the stack, and though a good little blaze started, the wind kept it from catching the stack before it was discovered.

The Hamline students, Miss Nellie Sylvester, Miss Inez Wahler, and Miss Emma Koenig returned today.
Miss Electa Sylvester, instructor of Music at Mayville, N.D. will spend the holidays at home. She is expected today or Monday.

=== [ 1895 ] ===

January 5, 1895- The following officers were elected at the M.E. Sunday School last Sunday. Supt.- E.L. Sylvester, Sec/Treas- A.P. Stafford.

February 16, 1895- Old Settlers- Elected E.L. Sylvester V.P.

March 9, 1895- E.L. Sylvester went to Rochester today to attend the funeral of his aunt Mrs. Yetter, who died in Montana and was brought back to her old home for burial. [HOWDER NOTE: This is Abigail Frances (Sylvester) Yetter; she actually passed away in Monte Vista, Rio Grande Co., COLORADO – not Montana].

March 16, 1895- The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. E.L. Sylvester on Wednesday afternoon March 30.

March 28, 1895- One of the largest crokinole parties this season was that given by Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester Saturday night. 7 boards were in full operation and there seemed to be no doubt but what all were enjoying themselves.
The Hamline students, Misses Sylvester, Wahler and Koenig, spent their week’s vacation in town.

March 30, 1895- E.L. Sylvester has bought the little Sullivan house of John Jones and has leased it to the Mahan sisters who will run dressmaking parlors.

June 1, 1895- Entertainment at M.E. Church- "Tom Thumb Wedding."
Bride- Francis Stafford
Groomsman- Park Sylvester
Bridesmaid- Meta Sylvester
Friday June 7th. Ice Cream and cake will be served at the close of the entertainment at 10 cents a dish. Admission 15 cents. Children 10 cents.

June 15, 1895- The Tom Thumb Wedding proved a very cute and pleasing entertainment. Mrs. Allen had the little tots drilled to perfection and the entertainment was much appreciated. Gross receipts $50.
Alumni Banquet- M.E. Church parlors
The program was closed by a solo by Miss Electa Sylvester ’89 much appreciated by all.
Miss Electa Sylvester who has been teaching at Mayville, N.D. is home for the summer vacation.
Misses Nellie Sylvester, Inez Wahler and Emma Koenig returned from Hamline last week to spend summer vacation.

July 8, 1895- Oratorio "Queen Esther" at G.A.R. Hall Thursday and Friday.
Queen Attendant- Miss Sylvester
Hagai- A.P. Stafford

July 20, 1895- Oliver Nelson is putting a cellar under his building occupied by A.P. Stafford.

August 10, 1895- The Temple of Fame- Musical Entertainment
G.A.R. Hall Friday and Saturday August 16-17
Japanese Maiden- Nellie Sylvester

August 31, 1895- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester of Milaca have been guests of his mother and brother this week.

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October 12, 1895- A.P. Stafford has purchased the west half of the Wedge foundation and will erect a brick block there. He went to Byron Thursday where he purchased a supply of brick. Work will be commenced right away.

October 26, 1895- Mrs. Sylvester left Tuesday for Milaca to visit her son Frank. She stopped at Hamline a couple of days to visit her daughter, Miss Nellie.

November 16, 1895- A.P. Stafford expects to move into his new building about the first of next week. (NOTE: The building was a one story brick building that replaced the former wooden one. The next owner would add a second story and the building is still standing.- 316 W. Broadway.)

November 30, 1895- A.P. Stafford celebrated the afternoon of Thanksgiving day by moving into his new brick building, which, after he gets it straightened up, will make one of the neatest stores in town.

December 21, 1895- Miss Nellie Sylvester, a student at Hamline, accompanied by her mother, who has been visiting her son at Milaca, will go to Mayville to spend her holiday vacation with her sister, Miss Electa.

=== [ 1896 ] ===

March 7, 1896- Village Caucus- E.L. Sylvester treasurer.

March 21, 1896- E.L. Sylvester has been unable to attend to h is duties at the bank this week on account of sickness.

April 25, 1896- E.L. Sylvester has built a porch on the west of his house.

May 9, 1896- E.L. Sylvester is doing some improving for the public good by laying a sidewalk in front of his property. He has a stretch of about 800 feet to build.

June 13, 1896- Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Sylvester returned from their visit to Milaca Monday night.
Mrs. M.A. Sylvester returned from Hamline Saturday accompanied by her daughter, Miss Nellie.

June 20, 1896- Miss Electa Sylvester, who has been receiving medical treatment at St. Paul for the past month, returned Monday night.
Alumni Banquet 8th Annual meeting- M.E. Church Parlors
Trio- Misses May Gillis, Edith Gillis and Nellie Sylvester
Recitation- Nellie Sylvester

June 27, 1896- Miss Electa and Nellie Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday.

July 4, 1896- E.L. Sylvester sold the Geo. Struble 80 this week to W.Z. Deuitz for $4,400.

July 26, 1896- Mr. Dyer, the class of ’96 of the Hamline University is a guest at the home of Mrs. M.A. Sylvester this week.

August 8, 1896- The M.E. Church Society and Sunday School held a very pleasant evening picnic in E.L. Sylvester’s nice large and commodious lawn last Saturday evening from 5 until 8 o’clock. Croquet, tennis, crokinole and other games were introduced and the old as well as the young greatly enjoyed the occasion. About 200 were present to whom refreshments were served first to the youngest ones and after which the older ones were seated on chairs in a circle and supper was served on laps.

August 22, 1896- The Ladies Aid of the M.E. Church meets with Mrs. M.A. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon.

September 5, 1896- Miss Electa Sylvester will give instruction in pianoforte, voice, art and Delsarte, according to methods used in New England Conservatory of Music.

December 18, 1896- The Delsarte entertainment given by the young ladies of Plainview, under the instruction of Miss Electa Sylvester, Saturday night, was a new feature in the amusement line, to say that it was good, expressive the sentiments of all who were present. The Delsarte movements, the posing and the speaking showed

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training and culture. The honors of the class were quite evenly divided as each one on the program seemed competent of fulfilling her part. Misses Electa and Nellie Sylvester rendered a couple of duets on the piano which were heartily applauded by the audience as was the violin duets by Misses Burchard & Purvis. The children’s drill was one feature on the program which created loud and continuous encore and especially good was the "Swanee River" pantomime. The tableaux were of the best that ever have been produced on the Plainview Stage. The class which has been in training under supervision of Miss Sylvester for a couple of months, are entitled to a great deal of credit for their accomplishments and Miss Sylvester is to be congratulated upon her complete success. Elgin Monitor.

December 19, 1896- Miss Sylvester visited Elgin Monday.

December 26, 1896- Miss Sylvester will reproduce her Delsarte entertainment at Elgin Tuesday night.
Miss Nellie Sylvester, teacher in the Wabasha schools, arrived home Saturday for the holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester of Milaca are spending the holidays with their Plainview relatives.

=== [ 1897 ] ===

January 2, 1897- The annual business meeting of the M. E. Sunday School was held last Sunday. The secretary’s report showed an enrollment of 175 with an average attendance of 128. The largest attendance was on Easter Sunday when 188 were present. The smallest attendance during the year was 89. Officers elected for the ensuing year as follows: E. L. Sylvester- Superintendent, Theo. Saxe- Asst., Miller Bolton- Secretary & Treasurer, Nellie Hall- Organist, Nettie Gorrel- Assistant, Kate Biers- Chorister.

January 30, 1897- Masonic Social Tuesday night at their hall. (Trio Mrs. Greg, Misses Sylvester and Hall. Solo- Miss Sylvester, Quartet- Mrs. Greg, Misses Sylvester, Hall & Cornwell.)

February 6, 1897- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester enjoyed every pleasure of a beautiful winter day sleigh ride last Sunday including the excitement of a tip over. They supposed no one saw them of course.
Miss Sylvester is teaching the 5th and 6th grades during the absence of Miss Richardson who has been ill for the past 2 weeks. Miss R. will probably resume her work on Monday.

February 20, 1897- Old Settlers Meeting. Officers elected F.D. Washburn- President, John Gage- VP, G.R. Hall- Secretary, E.L. Sylvester- Treasurer.

February 27, 1897- The following is the program of the teacher’s meeting to be held in Plainview Saturday March 5… Drawing Miss Sylvester…

March 13, 1897- Spring Elections… Village Treasurer- E.L. Sylvester.

March 19, 1897- Mr. Davis has sold his interest in the Plainview Bank to Frank Sylvester of Milaca. Mr. Davis will go to Boston to accept a position in his brother’s bank. Elgin Monitor

March 20, 1897- F.G. Sylvester, who is to take an interest in the Plainview Bank arrived from Milaca last week and has since been acquainting himself with the new business. Mrs. Sylvester and daughter are expected today or Monday.
A BUSINESS CHANGE
An important business change will take place in town on April 1st. J.H. Davis, Jr., who has controlled the Plainview Bank for the past 12 years has sold his interest to Messrs. E.L. Sylvester and F.G. Sylvester. The former a cashier in the bank for the past 15 years and the latter a late employee of the Great Western Railway. It was with

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regret that our people learned that Mr. Davis had concluded to leave Plainview. He is one of our most influential citizens, a thorough business man and a man of sound and trusted judgment. During his residence here he has always worked in the interest of the town, was always one of the instigators of any enterprise that would benefit the community and was ever ready to assist any charitable institution that was to benefit to mankind. He has served 1 year as chairman of the board of supervisors, and has served on the school board for the past number of years, always taking a deep interest in our schools and always stood ready to promote the education interest of the community. He has won the confidence of the people of this locality and for these reasons Mr. Davis will be greatly missed.
As to the new firm, which is to be Sylvester Brothers, there is nothing to be brought against them. Both are young men born and raised in this vicinity, while the elder brother has resided at this place, having spent his entire business life in the Plainview Bank, and is thus able and qualified to continue the business in a most satisfactory manner. The junior member of the firm, though born, raised and educated here, has spent the past several years at other points. A few years since he as been a resident of Milaca, where he as had charge of a railroad station on the Great Western line. Both are young men and there is no doubt but what they will readily earn the confidence of our people and will meet with success from the start.

April 3, 1897- New Bank Advertisement- Plainview Bank. Sylvester Brothers, Bankers.
Among the delegates from Plainview who attended the district Epworth League Convention at Rochester March 26-29, Messrs King, C.H. Rogers, C.D. Lewis, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Misses Mary Bolton, Myrtle Mallory, Nettie Gorrell and Nellie Hall.
The new banking firm of Sylvester Brothers began yesterday morning. Their announcement appears in today’s issue.
NOTICE: I have this day sold the business of the Plainview Bank to E.L. Sylvester and G.F. Sylvester, who will continue the same under the firm name of Sylvester Brothers.
Plainview, Minnesota, April 1, 1897. J.H. Davis, Jr.

April 10, 1897- F.G. Sylvester made a business trip to Milaca the fore part of the week.
The Greenwood Cemetery Association held their first regular meeting Tuesday. Officers elected… Mrs. E.L. Sylvester, treasurer…

May 15, 1897- The Ladies Cemetery Association annual dinner Saturday May 29th
Soliciting committee… Mrs. E.L. Sylvester… committee for furnishing flowers for use on the solders’ graves… Mrs. G.F. Sylvester…

May 22, 1897- The Greenwood Cemetery Association will serve dinner Decoration Day in the McCarty Building. An excellent dinner will be given for the small sum of 15 cents. Ice cram and cake will also be served.
Miss Electa Sylvester spent the fore part of the week at Rochester.

May 29, 1897- Program at commencement exercises… vocal solos by Misses Electa Sylvester and Nellie Hall…

June 12, 1897- The vocal solo by Miss Electa Sylvester was well applauded, showing the due appreciation of the audience.
Mrs. G.F. Sylvester and Miss Electa Sylvester drove to Wabasha Tuesday to attend the commencement exercises.

June 26, 1897- Miss Nellie Sylvester left Wednesday for her home at Plainview. She expects to spend several weeks at Chicago attending the summer training school there. Wabasha Democrat.

August 7, 1897- The graduating class of ’92 held their annual picnic on the shores of Lake Shady (NOTE- Located in Oronco, Minnesota) Thursday. The party consisted of Mrs. Art Daves, Misses Bolton, Wahler, Nellie Sylvester, Messrs Huxley and Weikel.

August 21, 1897- Play at the G.A.R. Hall, "Castle of Memory."

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Power of Memory – Nellie Sylvester, Grace Waterman, Vade Marshall, etc.
Mephistopheles – Frank Sylvester. Admission 25 and 35 cents.
Miss Nellie Sylvester is visiting friends at Pipestone this week. Mrs. Sylvester and daughter Miss Electa have gone to Ogden, Iowa for a short visit.

September 11, 1897- Library social at Hall Wednesday night. (75 present. In game Miss Sylvester guessed 29, earning 2nd place.)

September 25, 1897- Frank Sylvester left Saturday for Milaca where he spent a few days with friends.

October 2, 1897- Several from the Methodist Society intend spending Sunday at Winona in attendance of their annual conference. Among those mentioned as likely to go are Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, T. G. Bolton and daughter Miss Mary, Dr. T. F. Cooke, and Miss King.

October 16, 1897- The Epworth League will hold a business and social meeting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Friday evening. All members are requested to be present.

December 18, 1897- G. F. Sylvester has moved his family into the Stoltz house on Mechanic Street.

December 25, 1897- Miss Nellie Sylvester, teacher in Wabasha Schools, is home for the holidays.

=== [ 1898 ] ===

January 1, 1898- Mr. Dyer of Slayton is visiting in town this week.

January 15, 1898- Miss Nellie Sylvester of the Wabasha Schools spent several days visiting our class room last week (School News)

January 22, 1898- The Township treasurer, C. D. Burchard, paid over to the village treasurer E. L. Sylvester, Tuesday the stated amount of the bond surplus which rightly belongs to the village. It amounts to $727.31.

February 12, 1898- Old Settlers (Vocal duet- Miss Sylvester & Chas. Cornwell. Reception committee- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. E. L. Sylvester elected treasurer.)

February 26, 1898- The Epworth League Reading Circle will meet with Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Tuesday night.
March 19, 1898- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained at tea Monday night. The evening was spent at social games.

March 26, 1898- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester visited at the [ed., Twin] Cities this week.

April 2, 1898- At the Epworth League Convention at Winona beginning today, Miss Mary Bolton will read a paper on "Juvenile Work", Mrs. E. L. Sylvester on "What we may expect and accept in social work in the League" and Mrs. I. A. Grove, "The Triumph of the Year."

April 9, 1898- Ladies Cemetery Association- Mrs. E. Sylvester elected treasurer.
Miss Nellie Sylvester of the Wabasha schools is spending her spring vacation at home.

April 23, 1898- Miss Electa Sylvester will take charge of the music in an elocution and musical entertainment at Elgin this Friday night.

April 30, 1898- Miss Nellie Sylvester rode up from Wabasha on her wheel (NOTE- bicycle) Friday night.

They Raced
Tuesday evening was warm on Main Street. A couple of bicycle races were organized on short notice. The first was the ladies free for al and the entries were Mrs. Achenbach, Miss Martha Waste, and Miss Lydia Bliefus. Mrs. Archenback won, although the other ladies contend that the honors would have been theirs had they not

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lost their pedals. The second event was the free for all race for all sexes, and the entries were Miss Nellie Sylvester and H. M. Dugas. Miss Sylvester won. Harry not proving that all dangerous. J. W. Murdoch officiated as starter and referee and his decisions were as fair as could be expected from one not entirely disinterested. – Wabasha Herald.

May 7, 1898- Mesdames A. A. Marshall, G. H. Dickman, G. F. Sylvester, and Lee T. Meachum drove to Rochester Wednesday.

May 21, 1898- The M.E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. M. A. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon.
Ladies Cemetery Association Decoration day. Wait on tables- Mrs. E. and F. Sylvester.

May 28, 1898- Mrs. E. Sylvester is entertaining Mrs. B. F. Ward of Minneapolis.

June 11, 1898- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited Wabasha Wednesday.

June 18, 1898- Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester are spending the week in Wabasha, the guests of Rose and Ruth Vandyke.

July 9, 1898- Mrs. M. A. Sylvester and daughters Misses Electa and Nellie, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and children, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter left Tuesday for Maplewood Park where they will spend a couple of weeks.
The first special excursion to Maplewood Park left this morning at 6:30. In the neighborhood of 100 of our citizens availed themselves of this opportunity to hear the popular orator, Dr. Talmage, who is principal speaker at the Park today.

July 16, 1898- Sunday while Messrs E. L. Sylvester and G. F. Sylvester were out in the woods enjoying the beauties of nature’s scenery, they encountered an enemy to whom they at once gave battle and after a short struggle won a victory equal to Dewey’s in as much as they did not lose a man. Before leaving the battle field they stripped the dead of its values consisting of 12 rattles and a button.

July 23, 1898- Mesdames G. F. and E. L. Sylvester and children returned from their outing at Maplewood Park Monday evening.

July 30, 1898- Good entertainment at song recital Wednesday evening. Both Misses Sylvester and Waste retain the reputation they have made as readers and on Wednesday night seem at their best…

August 6, 1898- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sylvester entertained a party of friends Monday night in honor of Miss Edwards of Boston.

August 13, 1898- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained Monday evening in honor of her friend, Mrs. A. C. Steinman, of Winona.

August 20, 1898- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter have gone to Milaca for a visit.

August 27, 1898- Miss Electa Sylvester leaves today for the western part of the state where she joins a party of camping friends.

September 10, 1898- G. F. Sylvester left Saturday to Milaca to spend a week or so with friends. His wife and daughter will accompany him home.

October 8, 1898- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Mrs. G. R. Hall, and Mrs. I. A. Grove leave today for Winona to attend the Foreign Missionary Convention.

November 5, 1898- Miss Electa Sylvester who has been spending several weeks at points in the central part of the state, is home.

November 19, 1898- At a meeting of the Epworth League at the M. E. parsonage Nov. 11, the following officers were elected… Miss Electa Sylvester –L.W., G. F. Sylvester- Treasurer…

November 26, 1898- The Ladies Aid Society will meet with Mrs. M. A. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon.

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December 3, 1898- Her friends will be pleased to learn that Mrs. E. L. Sylvester is again able to be out, after her several weeks illness.

December 31, 1898- Mason meeting- recitation by Miss Nellie Sylvester.

=== [ 1899 ] ===

January 7, 1899- Miss Nellie Sylvester will leave Saturday for her school at Tracy if recovered sufficiently from the attack of Grippe from which she has been suffering this week, to do so.

January 14, 1899- Miss Nellie Sylvester sufficiently recovered from her attack of LaGrippe to return to her school at Tracy Tuesday.
A. P. Stafford returned home Saturday. He is of the opinion that he has discovered a fine country down in Iowa and has decided to locate at the little town of Holmes. He expects to move his family there next week.

January 21, 1899- A. P. Stafford and son Allen, left Wednesday noon with their car of personal effects for Holmes, Iowa, where he will open a hardware store. His wife and the balance of the family will remain here for a few days until he is settled in his new home.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Monday.

March 18, 1899- A girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Tuesday (NOTE: Katherine).

April 1, 1899- The following are the names of those who were present every day during the winter term. Second Intermediate- Nettie Sylvester, First Intermediate- Meta Sylvester, Kindergarten- Byrl Sylvester.

May 12, 1899- The M. E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon.

May 19, 1899- At a meeting of the Ladies Cemetery Association the following ladies were appointed for soliciting committee… Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…

May 26, 1899- The M. E. Ladies Aid Society will meet with Mrs. M. A. Sylvester on Wednesday afternoon.

June 2, 1899- Alumni Meeting- (T. G. Bolton residence decorated with Japanese lanterns. Election- Electa Sylvester- President, Etta Parr- VP, Minnie Wedge- Sec., Melvin Mallory- treas. The Misses Sylvester rendered a very pretty instrumental duet).

June 30, 1899- G. F. Sylvester and E. A. Carrell are attending the Sunday School convention at Mazeppa.

July 7, 1899- At county Sunday School Convention election- Executive Committee- G. F. Sylvester, Plainview.

July 21, 1899- The Methodist Sunday School and friends will have a picnic on the E. L. Sylvester ground Wednesday afternoon. Picnic supper. You are invited to come at 2 o’clock.

July 28, 1899- Mr. E. L. Sylvester and family drove to Minneiska Saturday morning and took a boat ride to Winona returning the same evening.
The Sunday School picnic at Sylvester grove on Wednesday was a very pleasant affair. About 150 people, old and young, sat down to the table spread with a sumptuous repast. The afternoon was spent in playing games and in the exercise of swings and hammocks. Nice place for a picnic.

August 11, 1899- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and children drove to Rochester on Saturday last.
Miss Electa Sylvester was in Rochester this week, the guest of Mrs. R. L. Blakely.
Carl Stephens has purchased a couple of lots from E. L. Sylvester on the corner of Broadway and Thompson. Mr. Stephens will make preparations to build a dwelling

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house there early next spring.

August 25, 1899- Miss Nellie Sylvester went to Pipestone Wednesday.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and children are camping at Oronoco this week.

September 1, 1899- Mrs. Frank Sylvester and children left Monday for a visit at her old home in Oak Park.

September 8, 1899- G. F. Sylvester made a trip north to Milaca and Oak Park this week.
Miss Electa Sylvester departed Tuesday for an extended visit with her sister Nellie at Tracy.

September 22, 1899- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and children returned on Saturday from and extended visit with her parents in Oak Park, Minnesota.

September 29, 1899- The Ladies of the Cemetery Association will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon.

October 6, 1899- The M. E. Ladies Aid Society will meet with Mrs. Frank Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.

November 3, 1899- E. L. Sylvester having remodeled and practically rebuilt his barn is now having it painted, making a great improvement in looks as well as convenience.

November 10, 1899- The M. E. Ladies Aid Society will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday.

December 22, 1899- Miss Mabel Sylvester of Madelia, Minnesota is visiting her cousins during the Christmas holidays.

December 29, 1899- Miss Nellie Sylvester returned from Tracy last week. Invitations have been issued for the wedding of Miss Nellie Sylvester to Mr. William P. Dyer on Wednesday next.

=== [ 1900 ] ===

January 5, 1900- Marriage of Miss Nellie M. to William P. Dyer of Slayton
The home of Mrs. M. A. Sylvester was the scene of a pretty wedding on Wednesday, the third, when her daughter, Miss Nellie M. was married to Mr. William P. Dyer, of Slayton. The house was beautifully decorated with evergreen, holly, roses, carnations, and Spanish moss.
About 40 guests assembled and at precisely 11 o’clock were heard the strains of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March, played by Miss Electa Sylvester. The bride and groom entered, preceded by the flower girls, Misses Meta and Birdie Sylvester, the former in pink and the latter in white, carrying roses and carnations. The bride wore a traveling dress of castor broadcloth trimmed with white satin and martin. She carried a bouquet of cream roses. The groom was dressed in black. They took their place in the parlor where one corner was very tastily decorated with ropes of evergreen intertwined with holly, the bridal couple standing on a fur rug "under the mistletoe."
Rev. W. E. King performed the ceremony, the ring service being used.
After congratulations had been extended, the guests were seated at small tables and an elaborate wedding breakfast served.
The happy couple departed on the afternoon train amid showers of rice. They go to St. Paul for a few days, then to Slayton where Mr. Dyer is engaged in teaching.
Both graduated from Hamline in ’06. Since that time Mr. Dyer has been a successful teacher in Slayton and his home was formerly in Pipestone. The bride needs no words of commendation. Her home has always been in this community where she is held in high esteem by all who know her and all join in sincere wishes for a long and happy life.
Many beautiful and useful gifts were presented. Those present from abroad were Mrs. Dyer and S. B. Dyer, mother and brother of the groom, from Pipestone; W. S. Crandall and wife of Winona and Miss Mabel Sylvester of Madelia.

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January 19, 1900- G. F. Sylvester went to St. Paul Wednesday to attend the Masonic Grand Lodge.

March 2, 1900- Baby party at Mrs. H. G. Austin
Mrs. H. G. Austin planned a pretty birthday party for their year old baby boy and issued about a dozen invitations to persons of about that age. A very enjoyable afternoon for the little ones and their mothers was the result. The guests arrived about 2 o’clock with their mammas and chaperones and from that time until dark, they enjoyed themselves with dolls, rattles, and all the paraphernalia of babyhood. That all were musically inclined became apparent when Miss Ella Schwantz rendered several instrumental solos on the piano.
Mr. Saxe was called in to photograph the company and for a time the negative promised to be a "howling" success but after recovery from their surprise, a good view was obtained and also one of the dining room, which was very prettily decorated with smilax and carnations.
A 5 o’clock tea was served, the feast of good things being especially enjoyed by the chaperones. Desirous of setting a good example to the elders they departed for home at an early hour, each carrying a card as souvenir of the occasion and waiving the hand in token of farewell.
Those present: Florence Davis, Donald Duerre, Francis Finch, Nellie Fuller, Grace Oliverson, Mildred Reifkogel, Bernice Richmond, Jesse Schouweiler, Jesse Slocumb, Katherine Sylvester, and Bernice Weikel.

March 9, 1900- A Measuring Party at the M. E. Church (3 cents per foot, and 1 cent additional per inch. Miss Sylvester gave a reading.)

April 6, 1900- Sylvester Brothers- Commercial Article
The school board was represented at our temple of learning Tuesday by Messrs. J. W. Mallory and G. F. Sylvester. -School News.

April 13, 1900- H. C. Anderson is remodeling E. L. Sylvester residence on W. Broadway this week.

April 20, 1900- E. L. Sylvester is making extensive changes in his resident property on W. Broadway. When completed it will be like a new home. H. C. Anderson is doing the work.
E. L. Sylvester is remodeling the interior of his residence on West Broadway and putting in a plumbing system throughout. Arrangements are being perfected whereby the entire building will be headed by hot water next winter. –Plainview Record.

April 27, 1900- G. F. Sylvester is pallbearer at J. F. Pope funeral (Lawyer)

May 4, 1900- E. L. Sylvester headed a fishing party that spent the day at the Zumbro River last Saturday. The other members of the party were his two boys and four or five others about the same age. They had lots of fun and got some fish and the boys say they are willing to go again.

May 18, 1900- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Winona by way of Weaver. (NOTE: That means they drove their horse to Weaver and left it in the stable and caught the train to Winona. It was quicker than going by train from Plainview.)

June 1, 1900- G. F. Sylvester spoke at Alumni Gathering. Piano solo by Electa Sylvester.

June 8, 1900- Prof. and Mrs. W. P. Dyer of Slayton, Minnesota arrived Tuesday night for a visit with her mother, Mrs. M. A. Sylvester (NOTE: she attended the HS Commencement exercise. Vocal solo "Mignon" by Miss Electa Sylvester).

June 15, 1900- County Sunday School Convention- 22nd annual Wabasha County- met at Lake City. Report given by delegate G. F. Sylvester. District President- G. F. Sylvester, Elgin area.

June 29, 1900- Musical at the G. A. R. Hall. Benefit of Cemetery Association- 15 cent admission. Reading by Mrs. W. P. Dyer, ladies quartet- Misses Electa Sylvester, Vera

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Burchard, Nellie Hall, Mrs. Dyer.

July 20, 1900- Mr. and Mrs. G F. Sylvester and children left Friday for Oak Park, Minnesota where they visited friends and relatives a few days.

July 27, 1900- Unanimous vote to organize an association for a street fair. T. G. Bolton President, Geo. H. Dickman V. President, G. F. Sylvester, Secretary, C. D. Burchard Treasurer.

August 10, 1900- Board of Education election. J. W. Mallory –Pres, G. F. Sylvester- Clerk, P. C. Wood- Treasurer.
Prof. and Mrs. W. P. Dyer of Slayton, who have been visiting her mother, Mrs. M. A. Sylvester for the past few weeks , left Tuesday for Pipestone where they will visit with his father before returning to Slayton. The were accompanied by Miss Nettie Sylvester.

August 17, 1900- Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and Stanchfield went to Rochester Tuesday.

August 24, 1900- The pupils of Miss Electa Sylvester gathered at their instructor’s home Wednesday evening and rendered a very pleasing musical program which was interspersed with sketches of the lives of Beethoven and Bach by Alta Meachum and Vera Saxe. Miss Sylvester was the recipient of many beautiful floral offerings, after which the following entertaining program was rendered… ("Danse Villageouse" Brunner by Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, "Chorous Priciosa" Weber by Birdie Sylvester, "Sad a dgay" Enckhausen by Meta Sylvester).

August 31, 1900- Miss Electa Sylvester entertained a company of young lady friends at tea Thursday evening.

September 7, 1900- G. F. Sylvester has broken ground for a fine new residence on the corner of Broadway and Lincoln Streets. The house is to be 28 X 38 feet, two stories and is expected to be ready for use before snow flies.

September 14, 1900- Send in applications for entries at the street fair just as soon as you can; the earlier the better. Go or send to the secretary G. F. Sylvester.

November 2, 1900- Epworth League (Officers elected. Frank Sylvester- Treasurer. Retiring President- E. L. Sylvester).

November 9, 1900- Miss Electa Sylvester went to Winona yesterday.

November 23, 1900- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester visited St. Paul this week.

December 14, 1900- Miss Electa Sylvester went to Minneapolis to attend the Grand Opera.
G. F. Sylvester has moved his family into their new dwelling house this week and hereafter Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester will be at home to their friends corner of Broadway and Lincoln Streets.

December 21, 1900- Miss Electa Sylvester returned from Minneapolis Tuesday evening.

=== [ 1901 ] ===

January 4, 1901- (NOTE: Picture of G. F. Sylvester House). The residence of G. F. Sylvester, corner of Lincoln and Broadway is of a different style of architecture, with all the desirable improvements, has large pleasant rooms and very conveniently arranged and has hot water heating plant. The total cost of Mr. Sylvester’s building is about $4,000. [HOWDER ADDITION: Equates to about $87,000 in 2005 dollars] (NOTE: this house was later owned by the Swanbeck family and later used as a convent for St. Joachim’s Catholic Church. It was later owned by High Plains and made into several rental units. It was demolished in the 1990’s.)

January 25, 1901- G. F. Sylvester attended the meeting of the Masonic Grand Lodge at


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St. Paul this week.

January 29, 1901, Tuesday- Emma went calling with Mrs. E. Sylvester in the afternoon. – Dickman Diary.

February 1, 1901, Friday- The M. E. Ladies Aid will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Thursday Feb. 7.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester were here in the evening planning for a Valentine Party. – Dickman Diary.

February 8, 1901- Mrs. W. P. Dyer of Slayton Minnesota is visiting her mother Mrs. M. A. Sylvester. Mrs. W. P. Dyer has been acting as substitute for Miss Champine in school this week.

February 23, 1901, Saturday- Mrs. E. Sylvester and Emma Eggers were here. – Dickman Diary.

March 1, 1901- Musicale at Church of Christ (Instrumental duet – Birdie Sylvester and Vera Peyton. Reading Mrs. W. P. Dyer. Vocal Solo Miss Electa Sylvester.) Admission 15 cents.
An Enjoyable Evening
Receiving an invitation to spend the evening of the 22nd at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and to "represent our hobby", we took our notebook and pencil and went. We found there about sixty others who had been "bidden" in the same way and who seemed just as curious to know what was to be done as we were.
Each guest wore or carried some emblem or picture which we supposed to represent our chosen "hobby", and on arrival was given a number and his hobby was recorded. He was then furnished a card and pencil on which to write the name and number of other guests and their "hobbies", if we could guess them out. It was a new scheme to most of us, but it became very interesting from the start, so that a busier company of people we have seldom seen either at work or recreation than those there assembled.
Some of the emblems were very plain while others were complex enough and even some of the plainest ones baffled the guesser by their simplicity.
Mr. F. L. Gilbert, the lumber man, had a couple of wooden toothpicks crossing each other fastened to the lapel of his coat, representing his well known hobby, fine lumber.
Mrs. F. L. Meachum wore a small card just over her watch on which was written the words, breakfast, dinner, supper- her hobby "meals on time." Miss Nellie Hall carried a Parke Davis Calendar, showing a picture of a sick cat, representing Mew-sick, of course.
F. J. Cornwell wore a tag on which was an original pencil sketch of a quiet fishing scene – a man seated in the shade on the bank of a stream, with rod and line, a good string of fish in the background and a lunch basket and little brown jug within easy reach.
Miss Electa Sylvester wore a picture of a cart and some written music, which taken together made "cartoons."
Miss Lizzie Koenig kept us guessing all the evening on a picture of some elephants placing railroad ties, though trunks and ties are very suggestive of "travel."
C. D. Burchard wore a little hatchet, which might have had some reference to the famous George Washington incident, but so far as we heard no one consterned it that way. Charley said it represented "Rheumatism" because it attached the joints.
We mention these few of the fifty four hobbies represented just to give an idea of how the scheme worked. After refreshments were served, the list of hobbies was read with the correct answers for each and the guessers checked those which they had correctly written. The highest number claimed was forty-four by Miss Nellie Hall, to whom was awarded the prize – a bunch of carnations.

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It is not necessary to say that all the guests enjoyed the evening, only we never worked so hard at a social entertainment in our lives.

March 6, 1901, Wednesday- Mrs. M. A. Sylvester died last night. – Dickman Diary.

March 8, 1901- Death of Mrs. M. A. Sylvester
The death of Mrs. M. A. Sylvester on Wednesday evening, March 6th, was a great surprise to her many friends in this community. Comparatively few knew of her serious illness which was of very short duration. The immediate cause of death was paralysis with which she was stricken only a few hours previously. She was one of the earliest settlers in this township and was widely known and highly respected.
Matilda A. Cook was born in Groaby, Canada East, November 5, 1838, was married to Geo. W. Sylvester in Wisconsin March 18, 1856 and moved to Woodland the same spring, which was the family home until several years after the death of Mr. Sylvester which occurred in 1876. In the year 1884 she left the farm and moved to the village where she has since resided.
Two sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of a loving and devoted mother, all of whom reside here, except one daughter, Nellie, Mrs. W. P. Dyer, whose home is in Slayton, but who has been here for some weeks. Five sisters and three brothers also survive her: Mrs. Lucinda Shaw and Mrs. Maria Sylvester, Nebraska; Mrs. Abbie Standish, Mondovi, Wisconsin, Mrs. Lida Wicks, Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, Mrs. J. Haessig, Plainview, Geo. Cook, Lincoln, Minnesota, John, Dodge Center, Solomon of Mondovi, Wisconsin.
The funeral services will be held this afternoon at 1 o’clock at the Methodist church and she will be buried in Woodland Cemetery, where her husband was laid to rest.

April 20, 1901, Saturday- Mrs. F. Sylvester was here in the afternoon. – Dickman Diary.

April 26, 1901, Friday- Mrs. F. Sylvester was here. Dickman Diary.

May 3, 1901- Sylvester Brothers have rebuilt the sidewalk along Washington Street east of the bank.
Weather cool. Emma, Mrs. A. Marshall, Mrs. E. Sylvester, Mrs. F. Sylvester went to Rochester after plants. – Dickman Diary.

May 29, 1901, Wednesday- Mrs. Abe Marshall and Mrs. F. Sylvester were here. – Dickman Diary.

May 31, 1901- Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, Askew, Laack, and Miss Electa Sylvester drove to Rochester Thursday.

June 28, 1901- Mrs. W. P. Dyer of Slayton Minnesota arrived Friday and will visit her brothers E. L. and G. F. Sylvester for a few weeks.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and children left this morning for Oak Park for a visit with her parents.

July 5, 1901- G. F. Sylvester left for Oak Park and Milaca the first of the week for a few days visit with friends and relatives.

July 12, 1901- Miss Electa Sylvester went to Elgin yesterday.
G. F. Sylvester and family returned home from Oak Park Friday.

August 2, 1901- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a number of young ladies Saturday at 5 o’clock tea in honor of Mrs. W. P. Dyer.
Mrs. W. P. Dyer left for her home at Slayton, Minnesota Tuesday morning, after visiting several weeks with her brothers E. L. and G. F. Sylvester and sister Electa Sylvester.

August 12, 1901, Monday- Emma went to a tea at Mrs. Edwin Sylvester’s in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

August 30, 1901- Miss Electa Sylvester visited friends at Owatonna from Friday until Monday.

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G. F. Sylvester and family went to Camp Schmoker to spend a few days. (NOTE- Camp Schmoker was a "resort" of sorts along the Mississippi River. You furnished your own tents and camped out on Mr. Schmoker’s land next to the river.)
Miss Mabel Sylvester of Madelia, arrived Tuesday and is the guest of her cousin, Miss Electa Sylvester.

September 6, 1901- Miss Electa Sylvester was at Eyota Saturday and Sunday.
Miss Electa Sylvester has arranged a Piano Recital for her pupils to be given at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester this evening.
Emma and Vera went to F. Sylvester’s in the evening. All the scholars of Electa played a piano piece and Vera played her first piece before a crowd. She done well and was applauded. She is 8 years old. –Dickman Diary.

September 13, 1901- The pupils of Miss Electa Sylvester gave a very entertaining piano recital last Friday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. The selections were all well rendered, creditable alike to the pupils and their instructor. At the conclusion of the musical program, Miss James of Eyota, who was present as the guest of Miss Sylvester, favored the company with a very pretty recitation entitled, "The Old Minstrel."
While the program was too lengthy to permit encores, the audience could not refrain from recalling Miss Mabel Huntoon, as a mark of special appreciation. After a short period of social enjoyment, the guests departed, feeling that they had been well entertained by Miss Sylvester and her pupils.

September 20, 1901- The Board of Education has secured Miss Electa Sylvester to fill Merritt Horn’s place while he is absent.

September 23, 1901, Monday- Mrs. Frank Sylvester was here. –Dickman Diary.

November 15, 1901- The Young Ladies Aid Society of the Methodist church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon. All members and those desiring to become members are cordially invited.

November 29, 1901- Misses Inez Wahler and Electa Sylvester spent Thanksgiving with friends in Winona.

December 6, 1901- E. L. Sylvester and sister Electa were Rochester visitors Monday.

=== [ 1902 ] ===

January 2, 1902- Mrs. F. Sylvester was here in the afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

January 3, 1902- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester were in Minneapolis a part of this week.

January 17, 1902, Friday- Emma was over to Mrs. E. Sylvester’s in the PM. –Dickman Diary.

February 7, 1902- Miss Electa Sylvester left Tuesday morning for Madelia where she will visit her cousins and from there go to Slayton for a visit with her sister, Mrs. W. P. Dyer.

February 14, 1902, Friday- The Catch-all Club surprised us this evening. They invited us to surprise E. R. Cornwell. We just got ready to go when the whole crowd came up here. There was 24 in all. Mr. and Mrs. Askew, Cornwell’s, C.D. Burchard’s, Slocumb’s, G. W. Lyons’, J. Burnham’s, E. L. Sylvester’s, G. F. Sylvester’s, P. C. Wood’s, Rev. and Mrs. Anderson, Mat Wood’s. They all brought a lunch which was served about half past 7 and after that they all played Crokinole and camp. They departed for their homes about half past ten. –Dickman Diary.

February 28, 1902- Old Settlers Meeting (G. F. Sylvester president for next year)
Miss Electa Sylvester returned from Slayton Tuesday.

April 4, 1902, Friday- We held our Catch-all Club at Frank Sylvester’s this evening. We had a good turnout. – Dickman Diary.

April 14, 1902, Monday- Callers were F. Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

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May 5, 1902, Monday- Callers were Mrs. Geo. Hall, Mrs. Marshall, Mrs. Ed. Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

May 9, 1902, Friday- Mrs. F. Sylvester was here today. –Dickman Diary.

May 15, 1902, Thursday- Visitors Mrs. F. Sylvester, Mrs. H. K. Oliverson. –Dickman Diary.

May 30, 1902- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon. Important business. A full attendance is desired.

June 7, 1902- Miss Electa Sylvester went to Minneapolis Wednesday to attend the commencement exercises at the State University.

June 12, 1902, Thursday- We all went to Minneiska and others that went were Ed. Sylvester and family, Lee Meachum, James Carley. They had a balloon assention and was a perfect success. We had a fine time and got home at 10 o’clock. –Dickman Diary.

June 13, 1902- Born to Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester on Wednesday June 11, a daughter (NOTE: Marion.)
Miss Electa Sylvester returned from Minneapolis Monday.

July 4, 1902, Friday- We had a picnic dinner on our lawn. Those present Burchard’s, Slocumb’s, L. Meachum’s, Mrs. Humphrey and children, Mr. Hall, Askew’s, Marshall’s, Electa Sylvester, and F. Sylvester’s -Dickman Diary.

July 18, 1902, Friday- We held electric light meeting in the evening and Mr. F. J. Cornwell, T. G. Bolton, A. Koenig and Sylvester Brothers agreed to form a stock company. –Dickman Diary.

July 22, 1902- Emma and Mrs. F. Sylvester went calling today. – Dickman Diary.

August 1, 1902- Emma and Mrs. F. Sylvester went calling today. – Dickman Diary.

August 8, 1902- The following are among the campers at Camp Schmoker… G. F. Sylvester and family…

August 9, 1902, Saturday- Emma, Franklin, and Alvin and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and her two boys went over to Rochester to take in the Wild Shows of the West. –Dickman Diary.

August 22, 1902- Applications for entries at the Street Fair should be made early to the secretary G. F. Sylvester. Quite a number have already been made but there is sure to be a rush the last few days. Attend to it now.

August 24, 1902- Emma, Mrs. Burchard, Mrs. Sylvester and Mrs. Lee Meachum went to Beaver this afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

September 5, 1902- The secretary is busy these days with applications for entries in the various classes. They are coming from all over the county and outside the county. Send in our applications early and save confusion at the last.
G. F. Sylvester took the morning train for Minneapolis Thursday.

September 9, 1902, Tuesday- Emma and I and Mr. and Mrs. F. Sylvester went to the Winona Street Fair. –Dickman Diary.

September 12, 1902- Messrs G. F. Sylvester, G. H. Dickman, F. L. Meachum and wives and Mesdames Aug. Smith, Milton Smith, Frank Leininger, and Isaac Leininger, T. G. Bolton, John Bolton took in the Street Fair at Winona Tuesday.

September 26, 1902- Street fair awards- China painting Electa Sylvester, Water color painting Electa Sylvester, Drawing in black and white- Electa Sylvester, Flowers: fern –Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Fancy embroidered sofa pillow –Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

October 5, 1902, Sunday- In the afternoon Frank Sylvester’s, Ed Sylvester’s and our family all drove to Millville. –Dickman Diary.

October 11, 1902, Saturday- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was over here in the forenoon. –Dickman Diary.

October 17, 1902- Miss Electa Sylvester left Monday for Dawson, Minnesota to visit her sister Mrs. W. P. Dyer, expecting to be absent 2 or 3 weeks.

October 24, 1902- The electricians have placed wires in the following residences during

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the past week. G. F. Sylvester, E. L. Sylvester, Geo Dickman, J. J. Erding, Geo. Wedge. (NOTE: The electric light plant has been built and the town is readying itself for the introduction of electricity.)

November 14, 1902- Special School meeting notice. Vote on bonds for new school. G. F. Sylvester clerk.

November 19, 1902, Wednesday- Emma was invited to a tea party at Frank Sylvester’s in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

November 21, 1902- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a large company at a 5 o’clock tea Wednesday evening.
Miss Electa Sylvester who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. W. P. Dyer, at Dawson, Minnesota, returned home Wednesday.

December 26, 1902- Electric Light Social at M. E. Church. Solo by Miss Electa Sylvester. (NOTE: the Methodist Church was the first church wired for electric lights and celebrated with a social.)

=== [ 1903 ] ===

January 9, 1903- The Literary Society met with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Monday evening. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. Robert Johnson Monday evening January 19.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester is at St. Mary’s Hospital Rochester for the treatment of a serious chronic difficulty. Her case was reported last evening as progressing favorably.

January 23, 1903- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Mrs. J. A. Slocumb visited Rochester last Friday afternoon.
E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester this morning expecting to bring Mrs. Sylvester home today. She has been gaining rapidly.
Miss Mary Bolton visited Mrs. E. L. Sylvester at Rochester Monday. Mrs. Sylvester is rapidly gaining strength and expects to return home soon.
Emma and Mrs. Frank Sylvester went calling. –Dickman Diary.

February 20, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester yesterday morning.
Travelers Club-March 2- Mrs. Slocumb
Short musical program to be arranged by Miss Electa Sylvester

February 24, 1903, Tuesday- Callers were Mrs. F. Sylvester and Mrs. Stephens. –Dickman Diary.

March 1, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon Emma and I and Leona went to Grandmother’s and also to Frank Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

March 4, 1903- Birdie Sylvester was over in the evening. Her and Franklin played on the violin and piano. –Dickman Diary.

March 6, 1903- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon March 11.
The basket social given by the M. E. Choir Monday evening was very well attended. A short musical program was rendered after which the baskets were auctioned off by G. F. Sylvester. They sold quickly and at prices ranging from 40 cents to about $2.05. The proceeds amounted to $25.

March 12, 1903, Thursday- Callers were Mrs. Dr. Duerre, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Emma Eggers. –Dickman Diary.

March 13, 1903- Travelers Club- Mrs. E. J. French- March 16 "Native Birds"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

March 17, 1903, Tuesday- Callers were Mrs. F. Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

March 20, 1903- Sylvester Brothers have this week received a fine new Burroughs Adding Machine, which greatly facilitates their labors in that line.

March 27, 1903- Mrs. A. F. Rockwell entertained a number of friends at Saturday

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evening at a 6 o’clock dinner, covers laid for 20… Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…

March 29, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon Emma and Vera and I went to Grandmother’s and then went walking with F. Sylvester and wife. –Dickman Diary.

March 30, 1903, Monday- Callers Mrs. Amos Boie, Mrs. F. Sylvester, and Anna Stephens. –Dickman Diary.

April 15, 1903, Wednesday- Callers were Mrs. F. Sylvester. Dickman Diary.

April 17, 1903, Friday- P. C. Wood, E. Meachum, F. Sylvester and myself went over to Zumbrota to look at their new school. –Dickman Diary. (NOTE: Plainview is building a new school house at this time.)

April 24, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Wabasha Tuesday.
G. F. Sylvester and Theo Saxe made a business trip to St. Paul Monday.
Traveler Club- April 27- Mrs. Austin
"The Financial System, Treasury and Mint" Mrs. Frank Sylvester
"Sculptures" Miss Sylvester

May 1, 1903- Special meeting of school district 60 in Village Hall to apply for state loan for new school. Geo F. Sylvester, district clerk.
Travelers- May 11- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

May 3, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon we took a walk with F. Sylvester and wife. –Dickman Diary.

May 15, 1903- Travelers club- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester- May 20
Duet "Barber of Seville" Rossini Misses Sylvester and Shaughnessey
Trio of guitars- Misses Drysdale, Shaughnessey, Sylvester

May 22, 1903- Mesdames L. M. Johnson, E. L. Sylvester attended the annual convention of the Women Foreign Missionary Society of Methodist Church at Byron Thursday and Friday of this week.
The banquet given by the Ladies Club "The Travelers" at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester on Wednesday evening was a most enjoyable occasion. Covers were laid for 50, each member of the club inviting one guest. To say that the elaborate spread and the carefully prepared program were pleasant surprises for the guests, is drawing it very mildly. To say that the tables were elegant and the program superb will give the reader only a faint idea of the complete preparations made by the ladies for the entertainment of their guests.
The tables were artistically decorated. The preparations of the repast showed that a "Master Hand" presided in the kitchen and the service was perfect.
Menu- Consomme, Salmon Salad, Wafers, Beef Loaf, Ham, Potatoes, Asparagus, Olives, Pickles, Jelly, Coffee, Ice Cream, Cake, Strawberries, Salted Nuts.
After the dinner program was introduced and directed by the president, Miss Amy R. French, whose opening address and tasteful management put the company at ease and kept them in good humor throughout.
The program was presented substantially as follows every number eliciting hearty applause and calling out deserved complimentary remarks.
(Partial Program. Duet "Barber of Seville" Rossini- Misses Sylvester, Shaughnessy, Quartet Misses Sylvester, Husby, Shaughnessey, Mrs. Meachum, Trio for guitar, Misses Drysdale, Shaughnesy, Sylvester).
At the close a vote of thanks was tendered Mrs. Sylvester by the club for her hospitality in placing her beautiful home at the disposal of the club for the occasion. The gentlemen present expressed their appreciation of the entertainment through their spokesman, Rev. Johnson, endorsed by a rising vote.

June 3, 1903, Wednesday- Emma was invited to a tea party at E. L. Sylvester’s in the evening. Dickman Diary.

June 5, 1903- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester gave a tea party Wednesday afternoon in honor of

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Miss Abbie Redding, the guest being former acquaintances of that lady. (NOTE: Miss Redding was a former teacher in the Plainview Schools).

June 7, 1903, Sunday- We took a ride in the afternoon down to East Indian Creek. E. L. Sylvester, Frank Sylvester, F. L. Meachum and families went along. We had lunch about 5 o’clock and then came on home. –Dickman Diary.

June 12, 1903- Mesdames I. W. Grove, E. L. Sylvester… Rev. G. W. Wise attended Sunday School convention at Elgin this week.
The following delegates attended the district Epworth League Convention at Pine Island… Miss Nettie Sylvester…
E. L. Sylvester went to Elgin yesterday evening.

June 13, 1903, Saturday- Frank Sylvester, P. C. Wood and I went to St. Paul on the evening train to look up brick for our new school house. –Dickman Diary.

June 14, 1903, Sunday- F. Sylvester, P. C. Wood and I was in St. Paul in the forenoon and went to Minneapolis towards evening. –Dickman Diary.

June 15, 1903, Monday- Sylvester, Wood and I was in Minneapolis in the forenoon and Frank and I went to St. Paul in the afternoon and in the evening Frank and I went to Stillwater. –Dickman Diary.

June 16, 1903, Tuesday- Frank Sylvester came home in the morning and I stayed over and picked out my fur coats and came home in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

June 19, 1903- Messrs. Dickman, Sylvester, Wood, and Slocumb, members of the school board, went to the Cities last week to investigate the matter of building materials to be used on the new school building, as the kind of brick and other materials will have to be definitely settled before contracts are let…
A party of ladies took advantage of the fine weather and good roads to drive across country to Rochester Thursday. The company consisted of Mesdames E. L. Sylvester, A. A. Marshall, L. T. Meachum, C. D. Burchard, G. F. Sylvester, J. H. Eggers, J. F. Thompson, and Miss Electa Sylvester.

June 26, 1903- The Women Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester on Friday afternoon July 3. A ten cent tea will be served at 6 o’clock. All will be welcome.

July 10, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Kellog Monday and they took the train for St. Paul. Mr. Sylvester attended the State Bankers Convention during his absence.

July 14, 1903, Tuesday- Frank Sylvester and I went over to Viola to see the rock man. –Dickman Diary.

July 17, 1903- E. L. Sylvester and family left for Camp Schmoker yesterday for a short outing.
Geo. H. Dickman and G. F. Sylvester made a business trip to Viola Tuesday evening.

August 7, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and children left Saturday morning on a visit to her parents.

August 10, 1903, Monday- Callers were Mrs. Leatherman and her sister, Mrs. Sylvester and Mrs. Marshall. –Dickman Diary.

August 12, 1903, Wednesday- Callers were Mrs. M. Wood, Mrs. E. Sylvester, and Meta, and Grandmother and Mrs. Stephans. –Dickman Diary.

August 14, 1903- Misses Electa Sylvester and Nettie Sylvester visited in Elgin Friday evening.
Miss Meta Sylvester entertained her Junior League class at a picnic on the church lawn Wednesday afternoon. She was assisted by Miss Lillian Grove.

August 21, 1903- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of ladies at a 5 o’clock tea Friday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughters returned Sunday from their visit with

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relatives in the northern part of the state.
Miss Electa Sylvester left Monday morning on her vacation trip. She will first go to Detroit Lake, Minnesota where she will stop for a short time and then visit friends in Mayville, Fargo, and other points. She expects to be absent about a month.

August 28, 1903, Friday- Franklin and Alvin went along with Park and Byrl Sylvester to Kellogg. –Dickman Diary.

August 31, 1903- Callers were Mrs. F. Sylvester, Miss Inez Champine, Mrs. Parr, Mrs. Abe Marshall and daughter. –Dickman Diary.

September 11, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Misses Etta and Nettie Gorrell, J. A. Carley, and Albert Reich were passengers for Winona Wednesday evening.

September 18, 1903- Miss Electa Sylvester returned Tuesday night from a months visit with friends in the western part of the state and the Dakotas.

October 2, 1903- T. G. Bolton, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Miss Mary Bolton left Thursday morning for Redwood Falls where they will attend the annual conference of the Methodist Church.

October 9, 1903- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last evening from Redwood Falls and other points.
At the postponed meeting of the Entertainment Association held in the League room of the M. E. Church Thursday evening, the following officers were elected: T. G. Bolton- President, W. J. Mosher- Secy, E. L. Sylvester- Treasurer… Course tickets $1 each.
Travelers Club- Mrs. Frank Sylvester- October 12
"The British Parliament" Mrs. F. Sylvester
"A visit to West Minister Abbey" Miss Sylvester

October 18, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon we hitched up and took a ride around by Beaver. Frank Sylvester and family and Mr. Mosher went along. Sylvester had an accident on the Fisher Hill. His horses got down and crowded off from the road. We had quite a time getting the horses up again but we finally got everything fixed up again and started for home. –Dickman Diary.

October 23, 1903- The Ladies Aid of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Wednesday.

October 25, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon F. Sylvester’s and us went out walking. –Dickman Diary.

November 8, 1903, Sunday- In the afternoon Frank Sylvester and wife were here and we all took a walk. –Dickman Diary.

November 13, 1903- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. Frank Sylvester next Thursday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained the officers and teachers of the M. E. Church at their home on West Main street last Friday evening at a 6 o’clock dinner. During the evening a short program was rendered which was very much enjoyed by all.
(C. Sylvester’s son’s wedding Winfield)_?? [HOWDER NOTE: Yes, this is correct. It was the wedding date for Winfield F. Sylvester, son of Charles Carroll Sylvester]
The ladies Aid Society of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon December 2.

November 30, 1903, Monday- Emma and I was invited to F. Sylvester’s in the evening for tea. The school board and all the teachers were there. –Dickman Diary.

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December 5, 1903- Travelers- Mrs. J. A. Slocumb- Dec 7
"Queen Victoria as girl and woman" – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

December 11, 1903- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester pleasantly entertained a large company of friends at their home on W. Broadway Tuesday evening at a 6 o’clock tea.
We was invited to F. Sylvester’s in the evening to a 6 o’clock tea. The Catch-all Club were all there. –Dickman Diary.

December 18, 1903- G. F. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester Thursday afternoon.
Meeting of Greenwood Prairie Court No. 1888 Independent Order of Foresters… Finance Secretary E. L. Sylvester, Treasurer G. F. Sylvester

December 25, 1903- Miss Electa Sylvester leaves today for Chicago on a several days visit to friends.
Traveler’s Club meeting at enjoyable session on Monday evening at the home of Mrs. Burchard. Program Reading "The Inquiry" Chas. McKay by Miss Electa Sylvester.

=== [ 1904 ] ===

January 1, 1904- Hundreds killed in Chicago Blaze. Fire Wednesday afternoon- Iroquois Fire. 550 killed in 10 minutes.
Electa Sylvester killed in the Iroquois Fire in Chicago.
The Funeral of Miss Sylvester
The brief announcement in last weeks NEWS of the death of Miss Electa Sylvester in the Theatre fire in Chicago added pain and poignancy to the general sorrow over the great catastrophe.
As anticipated, E. L. Sylvester returned Saturday noon with the body and arrangements were accordingly made for the funeral services to be held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist Church and although every available foot of space was occupied even out to the side hall door, many turned away unable to gain admittance.
The services were conducted by the Pastor Rev. D. M. Johnson, assisted by Rev. W. D. King, a former pastor, and Rev. A. D. Adams of the Congregational Church, Rev. King preaching the sermon.
A deep feeling of sadness pervaded the congregation, the speakers themselves being unable at times to proceed. It was not out of curiosity that hundreds of people came to the house of mourning bent to pay a tribute of respect and drop a tear at the bier of a departed friend, but everyone seemed to feel it a personal loss. It is seldom that grief at the death of one in the community is manifested so generally and sincerely. Qualities of mind and heart endured her to all who knew her and her straight forward manner to singleness and purpose commanded the respect and admiration of those whom she came in contact.
Miss Electa’s influence on her pupils at Farmington, Minnesota and at Mayville, N. D., was very potent as she was constantly hearing directly and indirectly from them. In self sacrifice, modesty, beauty of Christian character, and sweet womanliness, she appealed to all who knew her. In the words of the president of the Mayville Normal School, she was a "treasure."
The death of her aged widowed mother three years ago brought a saddening influence into her life which glorified her noble traits.
At the last meeting of the "Travelers Club", the lady’s literary club, she recited that beautiful poem of Chas. McKay "The Inquiry."
The casket was literally buried in a profusion of flowers wrought into beautiful and suggestive designs, the gifts of her companions and friends.
The following brief sketch was read from the pulpit at the close of the sermon.
Miss Electa Anna Sylvester was born May 16, 1870 in Woodland and moved

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to this village in 1883, graduating from the high school in 1889 as salutatorian of her class. Following this she graduated from the Winona Normal School in 1891 and taught at Farmington, Minnesota in the public schools one year. The next two years Miss Electa attended the New England Conservatory of Music and studied Music and Art. She accepted a position of preceptors and teacher of music at the Mayville, N.D. school which position she was forced to give up on account of ill health at the end of two years. Since that time she has resided in Plainview, the past two or three years assisting her brothers in the Plainview Bank.
The remains were taken to Woodland for interment beside her father and mother where the glory of the rising sun, which she so much admired, shall each morning cast a halo of golden rays on the last resting place of the beautiful girl in Woodland’s quiet sloping hillside (NOTE: The story was told that when E. L. Sylvester was called to Chicago to identify her body, her features were so mangled by the stampede she was caught up in that only a ring on her finger identified her.) [HOWDER NOTE: a website at http://eastlandmemorial.org/iroquois.shtml lists the victims of the fire and states that Electa Sylvester was visiting Mrs. Andrew Irle of 1240 Lawrence Avenue, and that her body was identified by a name on a handkerchief. Mrs. Andrew Irle was the wife of Andrew Irle, assistant superintendent of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, and her body was identified by her name on her wedding ring. Perhaps this is how the "ring" story came about?]
A Memorial Organ

May of our citizens know that for several months Miss Electa Sylvester was ambitious to secure a splendid organ for the Methodist Church. She had corresponded with several music houses concerning the matter and was endeavoring to find a way to raise about $250 for that purpose.
In his address Sunday afternoon, Rev. King spoke of the self-sacrifice of Miss Electa in singing and playing at our funerals, entertainments and in the churches without regard to denominations; he therefore suggested that this community could do nothing more fitting than to procure a memorial organ, thus carrying our her wishes.
Several citizens have taken up the matter and are meeting with a very generous response.
It is especially desired that what is given shall be a free will offering to Miss Electa’s memory, not as a denominational matter nor in the interest of a particular church.
"Blessed is he who follows generous impulses."

January 3, 1904, Sunday- The funeral of Electa Sylvester was at 2 o’clock PM. The pall bearers were T. A. Askew, Wm. Weikel, A. Koenig, J. H. Eggers, Miller Bolton and myself. –Dickman Diary.

January 8, 1904- Resolution of Respect from Plainview Traveler’s Club
We wish to thank the friends who so kindly assisted us in our bereavement.
Mrs. W. P. Dyer, E. L. and G. F. Sylvester and families.
Electa Sylvester obituary article.

February 5, 1904- Old Settlers meet February 3. G. F. Sylvester, President.

February 12, 1904- The Travelers Club will meet next Monday evening February 15 with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

March 10, 1904, Thursday- We had a Pit Party (NOTE: Pit is a card game.) tonight at our house. Those present C. D. Burchard and wife, Shumway and wife, G. F. Sylvester and wife, T. A. Askew and wife, Miller Bolton and wife, Gardner Colby, Abe Marshall’s, J. Thompson’s, M. J. Manchester’s, and J. H. Egger’s. –Dickman Diary.

March 11, 1904- Village Spring Election- E. L. Sylvester 245 votes for treasurer.
The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon. They will give a picnic supper to their husbands and sweethearts.

March 18, 1904- At the Republican primaries Saturday evening the following delegates were elected to the county convention… G. F. Sylvester. The roads were so poor however, that the delegates were unable to drive to Wabasha on Tuesday.

March 25, 1904- E. L. Sylvester, who was confined to his home several days last week, was able to be out and at his post in the bank for the first time Monday.
The dedication services of the Electa Sylvester Memorial Organ will be held in

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the M. E. Church at 8 o’clock this (Friday) evening. All are cordially invited.
The Electa Sylvester Organ was dedicated tonight. –Dickman Diary.

April 1, 1904- The Electa Sylvester Memorial Organ Dedicated Friday Evening
The dedication of the memorial organ which occurred at the Methodist Church on Friday evening last, was an occasion of great interest to many of our people and one that will long be remembered by those present.
The organ which was made to order by the Estey Organ Company of Brattleboro, Vermont was purchased through our former townsman A. P. Wadleigh, now with Howard, Farewell & Co. of Minneapolis, and the great power of excellent quality of its tone were well brought out by Prof. Swasey of St. Paul, the organist of the evening.
An excellent musical program was rendered in which nearly all the local musical talent kindly assisted. The anthems rendered by the full chorus were an inspiration to the audience.
A vocal solo by Mrs. C. E. Zeisinger, besides being a beautiful piece of music artistically rendered, had an added interest in the fact that the words were a tribute to the departed one, written for the occasion by her friend, Miss James of Minneapolis. "The Homeland" a duet by Misses Alta Meachum and Hessie Lillie was in keeping with the spirit and tone of the occasion.
"The Peace of God" a quartet by Misses Husby and Busch and Messrs. John Bolton and Chas. Marshall, combined a lofty religious sentiment with music of impressive character.
A shot address was made by Prof. Mosher, who had charge of the program and who paid a deserved tribute to the memory of her whose untimely death in the Iroquois Theatre fire had started the movement which had culminated in this dedication service, the suggestion of purchasing a memorial organ having first been made by Rev. W. E. King at the time of Miss Sylvester’s funeral, and promptly seconded by Mr. A. G. Laack and other citizens. Prof. Mosher closed by presenting the organ, in behalf of those who had contributed, to the trustees of the Methodist Church of Plainview, in whose behalf the pastor D. M. Johnston, accepted the beautiful gift in a few appropriate remarks.
Rev. A. D. Adams of the Congregational Church congratulated the donors and the recipients on the appropriateness of the memorial gift, as it would better than anything else perpetuate the memory of her in whose honor the gift had been made.
Presiding Elder Rule, who was present, was called for and made a very appropriate and touching address, referring to the "lost chord" which should be found again in the home beyond.
Prof. Mosher, in speaking of the people who had contributed to the purchase of the organ, emphasized the fact that the list was not confined to any class or creed, but embraced people of every church and of no church affiliation.
The beautiful silver name plate appropriately inscribed was a gift of Miss James, who came from the city to be present at the dedication. The organ cover was presented by Mr. Post of Minneapolis.
The subscription paper which as circulated principally by John F. Bolton and Iley A. Grove, was headed as follows:
Where it was the ambition and aspiration of the late beloved and much lamented Electa A. Sylvester to have secured during her lifetime for the Methodist Episcopal Church of Plainview, an organ, be it known that we the undersigned, her friends, desire to carry out her wishes in this matter and do contribute for this purpose the amount set opposite our names. The instrument purchased therewith to be known as the Electa Sylvester Memorial Organ.

April 8, 1904- Messes Vera Saxe, Rubie Lillie, Nettie and Meta Sylvester visited the Elgin Schools Thursday afternoon.

April 15, 1904- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited friends in Rochester Monday.

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Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for St. Paul Monday evening to spend Tuesday at the Cities

April 22, 1904- Edwin Sylvester and Dick Southwick left Saturday night for Brooklyn, New York where they go to attend to business matters. They expect to return home the last of the week.
Travelers on Monday evening April 25 with Mrs. L. T. Meachum
Special topic- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
While out hunting in Woodland last Saturday, Park Sylvester and Willie Schmidt accidentally shot the family driving horse of E. L. Sylvester. The horse was driven to town and bled profusely, yet nothing serious was anticipated until Monday when blood poisoning set in and the animal died Wednesday.

April 23, 1904, Saturday- Callers Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Mrs. Carley and Mother Eggers. – Dickman Diary.

April 24, 1904, Sunday- Emma and I went over to Edwin Sylvester’s a little while in the afternoon and we all walked out on the railroad track for a walk. –Dickman Diary. (NOTE: The railroad track went right behind the Sylvester house.)

April 29, 1904- Dedication of new school house.
G. F. Sylvester purchased a fine driving horse the first of the week.
E. L. Sylvester and Dick Southwick returned Friday from their trip to New York.

May 6, 1904- The Travelers Club will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Monday evening May 9. Special topic- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

May 10, 1904, Tuesday- We had a fishing part to Theilman. Those that went: Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Cornwell, C. D. Burchard’s, A. Marshall’s, Dr. Slocumb’s, John Burnham’s, Geo. Lyons’s, Frank Sylvester’s, John LaCraft’s and ourselves. We all took dinner at the hotel. I was the only one in the lot that caught any fish. We had a very nice time. We got home about 8 o’clock. –Dickman Diary.

May 13, 1904- Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and F. G. Schumway went to Dover Tuesday to attend a meeting of the Foreign Missionary Society.

May 27, 1904- The Travelers Club will hold a social and business meeting at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Monday evening. All members are requested to be present.

June 11, 1904- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited Elgin friends Thursday afternoon.
Emma, Mrs. Burchard, Mrs. A. Marshall, Mrs. F. Sylvester, and Mrs. Slocumb drove over to Rochester today. –Dickman Diary.

June 24, 1904- Plainview Street Fair directors meeting. Supt. Of divisions
Division H. Painting and Drying – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Attractions- G. F. Sylvester
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for St. Paul Monday to attend the Bankers Convention held at that place.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and children left for Oak Park Tuesday where they visited relatives until Thursday when Mr. Sylvester joined them on a Bankers excursion to the World’s Fair. (St. Louis)
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned yesterday from Minnetonka, where they have been spending the week in attendance at the State Banker’s Association meeting.

June 26, 1904, Sunday- Towards evening we took a ride and took Edwin Sylvester’s folks with us. –Dickman Diary.

July 8, 1904- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester who have been enjoying an outing at the St. Louis Fair returned home Tuesday. They were accompanied by their children who have been visiting with relatives near Milaca. Like others Frank says the "pike" is alright.

July 20, 1904, Wednesday- Callers in the evening Miss Shanessy, Drysdale, Theresa Eggers and Mrs. F. Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

July 22, 1904- Messrs and Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and J. A. Slocumb started Monday evening for St. Louis where they will spend several days at the big show.

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August 5, 1904- Messrs and Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and M. J. Manchester returned from St. Louis Saturday. They have spent a most delightful time at the fair and say that it is well worth making a sacrifice to attend.
Sidewalk notice-
E. L. Sylvester Lot 1 Thompson addition- repair and level walks abutting Broadway.
G. G. Sylvester Lots 2&3 Thompson addition- repair and level walk abutting on Broadway and Lincoln.

August 9, 1904, Tuesday- Emma was over to Ed. Sylvester’s to a 5 o’clock tea. –Dickman Diary.

August 10, 1904, Wednesday- Leona and Vera was invited to little Edwin Sylvester’s birthday party. –Dickman Diary.

August 12, 1904- The M. E. Ladies Aid Society and Priscillas will give a lawn social at the home of E. L. Sylvester on Friday evening August 12. Supper will be served from 5 to 8. Everybody invited to come and have a good social time.

August 19, 1904- E. L. Sylvester and family started for Camp Schmoker Monday afternoon where they spent several days. They were joined Tuesday by Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Grove, Arthur and Lillie Grove and Etta Gorrell.

August 26, 1904- The families of E. L. Sylvester and M. A. Grove returned from Camp Schmoker Friday.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained the Physical Culture Class at her home on West Broadway Monday evening.
In an interview with the secretary of the Street Fair Association, G. F. Sylvester this week, he informed us that music has been arranged and several free attractions have been contracted.

September 2, 1904- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to the Cities Monday on a visit to friends.
G. F. Sylvester spent several days at the fair this week and while there secured a few attractions for our Street Fair.

September 9, 1904- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter, who have been spending a few days at the Cities, returned home Friday.

September 16, 1904- E. L. Sylvester drove to Minneiska Wednesday on business.
E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Tuesday on a business trip.

September 23, 1904- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was called to Fargo, N.D. as a witness in a larceny case the first of the week. Sometime ago when she returned from her trip to St. Louis, her satchel was by mistake carried to Fargo where a thief broke into the baggage room and stole it. She was called to identify the article.

September 30, 1904- Mrs. W. P. Dyer, who has been the guest of relatives for the past few weeks, returned to her home at Dawson Tuesday.

October 7, 1904- The ladies furnishing the various carriages well deserved the many compliments given them as they passed in review under the skillful direction of Geo. French, grand marshal for the day.
Carriages decorated and driven by Miss Nettie Sylvester, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester…

October 10, 1904, Wednesday- We went to a picnic below Beaver. We had our dinner out in the woods. Those who went Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Cornwell, Burchard’s, Askew’s, Wm. Lyons’, Geo. Hall’s and Ed. Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

October 14, 1904- The Travelers will meet with Mrs. Waste next Monday evening October 17. "American portrait Painters and their Pictures" – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Saturday afternoon with her Elgin friends.

October 28, 1904- The Women’s Foreign Missionary Society will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.
Thomas Cunningham of Millville, purchased the Electa Sylvester property on Broadway Monday and will move to town this fall.

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November 4, 1904- Republican Rally at G. A. R. Hall Saturday evening… G. F. Sylvester acting as chairman of the meeting and introduced G. H. Hammond of Lake City, Republican candidate for representative, who addressed the audience briefly…

November 11, 1904- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday. A business meeting will be held and a full attendance is desired.
The Travelers Club will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Monday evening November 14.

November 18, 1904- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Monday for Fargo, N. D. where she goes to appear before the grand jury as a witness in a larceny case.
Mesdames E. L. Sylvester, C. D. Burchard, A. A. Marshall and Miss Bessie Smith are spending the day at Rochester.

November 25, 1904- The Travelers will meet with Mrs. C. D. Burchard next Monday evening. "Special Topic" – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

December 2, 1904- The M.E. Aid Society will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Wednesday December 7. A full attendance is desired.

December 9, 1904- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained the ladies of the M. E Ladies Aid Society at tea Wednesday evening. 38 guests were present.

December 16, 1904- S. S. Lyons and E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Monday afternoon on business.

December 30, 1904- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday. A full attendance is desired.

=== [ 1905 ] ===

January 13, 1905- The Travelers meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Monday January 16, "Corol Troyon" – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

January 20, 1905- G. F. Sylvester went to St. Paul Wednesday on business and to attend the Masonic Grand Lodge.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester called on friends in Elgin Wednesday afternoon.

January 23, 1905, Monday- Dr. N. S. Tefft was buried today. Pall bearers were E. L. Sylvester, G. F. Sylvester, C. D. Burchard, H. K. Oliverson, H. Austin and myself. –Dickman Diary.

January 27, 1905- Travelers will meet next Monday evening with Mrs. F. G. Schumway. Selections from Samson and Delilah- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
E. L. Sylvester and family were all over here in the evening and stayed until 12 o’clock. –Dickman Diary.

February 1, 1905, Wednesday- Frank Sylvester and I visited school this afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

February 10, 1905- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for the cities Wednesday evening to spend the balance of a week with friends and also to be in attendance at the State Bankers Meeting.

February 17, 1905- Old Settlers election. G. F. Sylvester- President. Solo sung by Miss Nettie Sylvester which was heartily encored. Duet Misses Ida Husby and Nettie Sylvester.
After supper we surprised C. D. Burchard’s. Those present Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, G. F. Sylvester’s, Lee Meachum’s, and Dr. Slocumb’s. –Dickman Diary.

February 20, 1905, Monday- Emma and I was invited to Geo. Wedge’s for supper and Whist (NOTE: Whist was a card game.). On our way home Abe Marshall and wife, L. Sundquist’s and Emma and I put on masks and went up to Frank Sylvester’s and had a big old time. –Dickman Diary. (NOTE: Masquerade at G. A. R. Hall the following night.)

February 24, 1905- Owing to a misunderstanding the regular meeting of the Plainview Travelers has been fixed for next Monday February 27 at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

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The Dorcas Society will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Thursday afternoon March 2. A full attendance is desired.

March 17, 1905- The Travelers will meet next Monday evening with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. "German Composers of today with selections" Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

March 24, 1905- E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Tuesday morning to be present at the Bankers Meeting.

March 31, 1905- The Travelers will meet next Monday on April 3 with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. Arrangements will be made at this meeting for a special program in honor of Mrs. Allen, President of the State Federation of Women’s Clubs who will visit our club Monday April 17.
The spring meeting of the Street Fair Association was held at the office of the secretary G. F. Sylvester Wednesday of this week.

April 14, 1905- Travelers will meet with Mrs. Burchard Monday evening April 17. "Madonnas in Italian Art" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. Officers elected- Treasurer Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

April 21, 1905- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. A picnic supper will be served at 6 o’clock to which the gentlemen are invited. A full attendance is desired.

April 28, 1905- E. L. Sylvester and S. S. Lyons went to Rochester Thursday to attend to legal business. (NOTE: S. S. Lyons was a Plainview attorney.)

May 12, 1905- The Plainview Travelers will hold their annual banquet at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Monday evening.

May 19, 1905- Meeting of Public Library Association, President Dr. E. E. Smith, VP James Wedge, Sec. Lee T. Meachum, Treasurer E. L. Sylvester (NOTE: The purpose was to form a public library)
Committee of 5 ladies on membership- Mrs. A. M. Weeden, Mrs. C. D. Burchard, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Miss Zora Lyons, Miss Mary Lahey.
The Plainview Travelers held their annual banquet in the G. A. R. Hall Monday evening. It was first intended to have a picnic supper on G. F. Sylvester’s lawn, but the weather would not permit.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Park and daughters Nettie and Meta drove to Rochester Saturday and spent the day with friends.

May 26, 1905- Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and R. W. Chapman went to Minneapolis Friday afternoon on a few days visit to friends.
Teachers and members of the class of 1905 gave a surprise party to Miss Nettie Sylvester at her home Wednesday evening to honor her birthday. A dainty supper was served at 6 o’clock and the remainder of the evening was spent in a most pleasing manner. As a token of esteem a number of very nice birthday gifts were presented to Miss Sylvester.

May 30, 1905, Tuesday- Decoration Day today. The business men of north and south side of the street played a game of ball. Resulted 15 to 10 in favor of the South. In the evening E. L. Sylvester and family and our family had a picnic supper. –Dickman Diary.

June 9, 1905- Graduation at G. A. R. Hall. Vocal Solo by Miss Nettie Sylvester.

June 16, 1905- E. L. Sylvester, James A. Carley, and H. D. Smith drove to Wabasha Saturday on legal business.

June 21, 1905, Wednesday- Nettie Sylvester was over and helped Emma make a quilt for Mrs. Slocumb. –Dickman Diary.

June 23, 1905- Old Settlers Picnic in Washburn’s Grove. G. F. Sylvester, President, master of ceremonies. (NOTE: Washburn’s Grove was located 2 miles east of Plainview on Co. Road 27- presently the John Keopsell farm.)
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Tuesday morning for Minnetonka to attend the State Bankers meeting.

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Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. J. W. Mallory and Mrs. William Lyons drove to Rochester Thursday morning to attend the Missionary Convention.

June 28, 1905, Wednesday- Our family and G. F. Sylvester’s family and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Park and Byrl drove to Wabasha to attend their carnival. We got home about 10 o’clock. –Dickman Diary.

June 30, 1905- Geo. H. Dickman and G. F. Sylvester were at Wabasha Wednesday to take in the sights at the carnival and in the interest of the Plainview Industrial Fair Association…

July 21, 1905- E. L. Sylvester and Rev. H. F. Ackerman drove to Minneiska Monday afternoon to locate a camping ground that they might enjoy a few days outing with their families. Owing to the high water at Camp Schmoker it is necessary for those who desire to take their outing at this time to seek for new locations.
The families of E. L. Sylvester and Rev. H. F. Ackerman left early Thursday morning for Camp Schmoker where they will store their goods preparatory to enjoying several days camp life. On arriving at Schmoker they will row across to Alma, Wisconsin to take a trip up the river on a pocket boat to the Cities, then return to Camp and spend the balance of their time at the cottage.
The following party of Plainview Masons drove to Minneiska Monday afternoon where they chartered the launch, "Flossie H" and went to Winona to attend a meeting of that order which was held that evening… G. F. Sylvester… after the meeting they came back to Minneiska in the launch and from there drove home. All Sylvester’s enjoyed the trip and were delighted with the cordial reception tendered them by the Winona members.

July 23, 1905, Sunday- In the afternoon Frank Sylvester’s and us took a walk. –Dickman Diary.

July 26, 1905, Wednesday- The young people had an old fashioned dance in Blake Fisk’s barn this evening. A party of us consisting of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Burchard’s, Woodcock’s, Mrs. Colvin, Kate Shawnessy and ourselves went out a little while. We al danced once and then went home. –Dickman Diary.

July 28, 1905- A large company of friends enjoyed a very pleasing and entertaining musical at the home of G. F. Sylvester Tuesday evening.

August 4, 1905- The families of E. L. Sylvester and Rev. H. F. Ackerman who have been enjoying a two weeks outing at Camp Schmoker, returned home Tuesday night. They reported that the water in the river has dropped 3 feet.

August 5, 1905, Saturday- Frank Sylvester’s started for Portland. –Dickman Diary. [HOWDER NOTE: Some of the Sylvester cousins lived in and around Portland, Oregon, and perhaps this influenced the vacation destination?]

August 26, 1905, Saturday- Our family was to supper at E. L. Sylvester’s in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

August 30, 1905 Wednesday- Franklin and Park Sylvester and Meta and Lillie Grove drove to Rochester. –Dickman Diary.

September 1, 1905- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned from their western trip Monday evening. Both were elated over the trip and state that they have enjoyed the most delightful journey of their lives. They were accompanied home by their children, who have been visiting with relatives at Milaca.

September 12, 1905, Tuesday- Emma and I and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Sylvester went to Winona to the Street Fair. –Dickman Diary.

September 15, 1905- The following citizens left for Winona Tuesday evening to attend the Street Fair. Messes and Mesdames J. J. Erding, E. L. Sylvester, and G. H. Dickman.

September 22, 1905- The first meeting of the Travelers proved to be very enjoyable. Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. Meachum and Miss Bolton gave delightful descriptions of their summer trips.

October 20, 1905- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Thursday afternoon.

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October 31, 1905, Sunday- The Catch-all Club gave us a surprise. They came at suppertime and all had supper here. Those in the party C. D. Burchard’s, E. R. Cornwells, Rev. Griffith’s, Rev. Ackerman’s, Matt Wood’s, William Lyon’s, A. Marshall’s, G R. Hall’s, Lee T. Meachum’s, Dr. Slocumb’s, Mrs. Huntley, E. L. Sylvester’s, G. F. Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

November 14, 1905, Tuesday- Emma was invited to G. F. Sylvester’s in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

November 17, 1905- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and sons Park and Byrl, leave for the Cities this afternoon to spend Saturday and Sunday with Miss Nettie Sylvester.

November 24, 1905- Travelers Club November 27- Mrs. Burchard
"German Literature Period 2 1300-1500 Hans Sacks" –Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

December 1, 1905- Miss Meta Sylvester left for Hamline Wednesday afternoon to spend Thanksgiving with her sister, Miss Nettie and other friends.
G. F. Sylvester made a business trip to Hammond Monday and he states that the drive home was anything but pleasant.

December 15, 1905- Travelers Club- Monday December 18- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
A German Christmas
Ladies Circle G. A. R. Tuesday evening. Officers elected- Treasurer Mrs. Kate Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Wabasha Saturday He was accompanied as far as Kellogg by his wife who took the train there for Winona were she spent the day.
Teachers Meeting Dec. 16 1:30 Program Recitation "Ole Bull’s Christmas" Miss Meta Sylvester.

December 29, 1905- G. F. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester Tuesday.
Miss Nettie Sylvester pleasantly entertained a number of friends Thursday evening.

=== [ 1906 ] ===

January 5, 1906- Miss Nettie Sylvester returned to her school duties at Hamline Tuesday morning after spending the holidays with her parents and friends here.
Travelers January 8 Mrs. L. T. Meachum
"Dresden China" Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was a Rochester visitor Tuesday.
Annual meeting for stockholders of the Plainview Canning Company. Tuesday January 9 at 2 o’clock. E. L Sylvester Secretary.

January 12, 1906- Geo. H. Dickman, G. F. Sylvester and T. G. Bolton went to Minneapolis Wednesday as delegates to the state Agricultural Meeting in session at that time.

January 26, 1906- The annual meting of the stock holders of the Plainview Canning Company was held Wednesday afternoon at the village hall. The reports of the secretary E. L. Sylvester and the treasurer F. G. Shumway were approved. Although prices are low it seemed to be in the opinion of the stock holders present that the factory should be operated the coming year…
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was a Rochester visitor a few days last week.

January 29, 1906, Monday- Mrs. Sylvester called in the afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

February 2, 1906- Park Sylvester and sister, Miss Meta, spent Sunday with friends at Rochester.

February 16, 1906- Travelers February 19- Mrs. Carley
"Munich and Berlin as Art Centers" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Old Settlers- G. F. Sylvester President

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March 9, 1906- G. F. Sylvester and G. H. Dickman visited on the second floor Friday. (School News)

March 11, 1906, Sunday- We went over to G. F. Sylvester’s in the afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

March 16, 1906- Travelers Club March 19 Mrs. Austin
"Selections from Lohengrin" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

March 23, 1906- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday afternoon to attend Sousa’s band concert.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Anna, were Rochester visitors Saturday.
Miss Nettie Sylvester visited the lower rooms of our school Tuesday (School News)

March 26, 1906, Monday- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was over here nearly all afternoon. –Dickman Diary.

March 30, 1906- Misses Vera Saxe and Nettie Sylvester, who have been enjoying their spring vacation at home, returned to Hamline Wednesday to resume their studies at the University.
Travelers meet April 2- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.
A company of young people of the M. E. Church sprung a surprise on G. F. Sylvester Tuesday evening. While the surprise was not complete, it did not deter Frank from being a genial host and all thoroughly enjoyed the evening.
Park Sylvester entertained the Freshman class at his home on W. Broadway Friday evening. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all and the only regrets expressed by the class were that they were not enabled to enjoy many more of such occasions. Various games were the past time of the evening and before the guest departed all enjoyed a toothsome repast.

April 6, 1906- E. L. Sylvester left for Buffalo, N. Y. the latter part of last week on a business trip.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited the lower rooms Friday (School News)

April 12, 1906, Thursday- Emma and I was to a supper at E. L. Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

April 13, 1906- The following gentlemen left for Winona Thursday afternoon to attend the Maundy – Thursday banquet held in that city. H. D. and Dr. E. E. Smith, F. L. Gilbert, and G. F. Sylvester.

April 27, 1906- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday.
Meta Sylvester and Anna Schwirtz have been chosen as delegates from the high school to take part in the declamatory contest which is to be held at Wabasha May 5.

May 4, 1906- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to the Cities Friday morning on a short visit.

May 11, 1906- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Park drove to Wabasha Saturday afternoon to be present at the Declamatory Contest.

May 18, 1906- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to the Cities Friday on a short visit to her daughter, returning Sunday afternoon. She was met at Kellogg by her husband and sons.

June 1, 1906- Perfect Attendance: First –Katherine Sylvester, Edwin Sylvester. 6th-Byrl Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Winona Monday.
Sylvester Brothers installed an addition to the burglar alarm in the Plainview Bank this week. The gong is placed on the outside above the door and can be heard all over the village. They intend to be prepared to call out the whole town in case of an attempted burglary.

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June 8, 1906- Misses Vera Saxe and Nettie Sylvester returned from Hamline Wednesday night to enjoy their vacation at home with their parents and friends.
The following ladies left for Chatfield Tuesday afternoon to attend the Women’s Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church… Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Miss Kate Shaughnessy went to St. Paul Tuesday morning to attend a meeting of the Women’s Federation Clubs.

June 12, 1906, Tuesday- Emma was over to G. F. Sylvester’s to a tea party in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

June 22, 1906- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Kellogg Wednesday morning where they took the train for Lake Minnetonka to attend the meeting of the State Bankers Association. They were accompanied by their daughter, Miss Meta, who will go to Alexandria to spend the summer with her aunt, Mrs. W. P. Dyer.
Misses Mary Bolton, Birdie Sylvester, and Jerry Baldwin returned from Spring Valley Monday afternoon where they had been in attendance at the Epworth League Convention.

June 29, 1906- E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to the Cities the first of the week.

June 30, 1906, Tuesday- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Emma and I went out to Frank Washburn’s to their 25th anniversary. –Dickman Diary.

July 4, 1906, Wednesday- E. L. Sylvester and wife, Edwin and Leona and Emma and I drove to St. Charles. We got back at 12 o’clock in the night. Very nice moon last night. –Dickman Diary.

July 6, 1906- Sylvester Bank to Incorporate

July 13, 1906- The M. E. Sunday School enjoyed a pleasant picnic Thursday afternoon on the E. L. Sylvester’s lawn.

July 16, 1906, Monday- Mrs. Burchard, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Emma and I fixed up the premium list. (NOTE: List was for the Street Fair.) -Dickman Diary.

July 20, 1906- Geo. Dickman, E. L. Sylvester, Andrew French, and Will G. Mack made a business trip to Wabasha Wednesday.

July 27, 1906- E. L. Sylvester and family drove to Minneiska Monday where they spent the day on the Mississippi. They report a most enjoyable time and had the pleasure of visiting the young ladies who were making their home in the house boat on the river.

August 3, 1906- Special State Bank examiner was in the village Wednesday. He inspected the Plainview Bank, Sylvester Brothers Bankers, and delivered to them the state authorities certificate of the Plainview State Bank, empowering them to commence business on August 1, 1906 as a State Bank with a capital of $30,000.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Park went to Rochester Wednesday afternoon where the latter goes to consult with Dr. Mayo with regard to his eye. In some unaccountable manner he had the misfortune to poison his eye and it was thought best to consult a specialist before more serious complaints set in.
The Plainview State Bank has recently installed a handsome new arc light.
W. G. Mack and G. F. Sylvester came down one day this week, captured 28 fine fish. They are land lubbers no longer. We take off our hats to them. -Wabasha Herald.

August 10, 1906- G. F. Sylvester drove to Kellogg Tuesday afternoon where he took the train for the Cities. He was joined at St. Paul by Mrs. Sylvester and children and together they will go to Milaca and will spend the next few weeks in that vicinity among relatives and old friends.

August 17, 1906- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Monday afternoon in Rochester.

August 24, 1906- G. F. Sylvester and family, who have been enjoying the past two weeks with relatives and friends at Milaca and vicinity, returned home Saturday night.
E. L. Sylvester and family and Mr. and Mrs. Lee T. Meachum drove to Camp Schmoker Saturday night to enjoy a several days outing on the river.

August 31, 1906- The families of E. L. Sylvester and M. A. Grove returned Saturday

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from Camp Schmoker. All report a most delightful outing and feel that the time passed only too quickly.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Park, went to Rochester Tuesday where the latter goes to receive treatment for his eyes.

September 7, 1906- Miss Meta Sylvester who has been spending the summer with her aunt, Mrs. W. J. Dyer, at Alexandria, returned home Saturday.

September 14, 1906- Misses Nettie Sylvester and Vera Saxe left Tuesday morning for Minneapolis where they will resume their studies at Hamline.
G. F. Sylvester, M. E. Jenks and Dr. E. E. Smith attended Lodge at Rochester last Thursday night.

September 28, 1906- Travelers meet October 1 – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

October 12, 1906- Travelers at Mrs. E. L. Sylvester October 15.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, Albert Koenig, Milton Leininger, and Miss Mattie Holzer drove to Rochester Tuesday.

October 26, 1906- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Winona Wednesday to attend the annual meeting of the Women’s Federation of Clubs.
Travelers at Mrs. H. G. Austin October 29
Reading "The Martyrdom of Joan of Arc"- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester

November 23, 1906- Travelers Nov. 26 Mrs. Balcom
Piano Solo- Mrs. Austin and Mrs. Sylvester
"James II" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Park Sylvester was pleasantly surprised at his home Tuesday evening by a number of his friends. The evening was spent playing games and various other amusements and light refreshments were served.

December 7, 1906- Travelers December 10 Miss Lyons
"Napoleon Bonaparte" –Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

December 28, 1906- Misses Nettie Sylvester and Vera Saxe who are attending school at Hamline, returned home Thursday evening to spend the holidays.

=== [ 1907 ] ===

January 8, 1907, Tuesday- E. and G. F. Sylvester started for St. Paul on the 1:45. Got to St Paul at 7:30. –Dickman Diary.

January 9, 1907, Wednesday- G. F. Sylvester and T. G. Bolton and myself were in St. Paul in the forenoon and in Minneapolis in the afternoon. We went out to the experimental farm in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

January 10, 1907, Thursday- We are in Minneapolis until noon. G. F. Sylvester started for Winona in the morning. –Dickman Diary.

January 11, 1907- Ladies Circle of G. A. R. installed Tuesday evening January 8. Dinner at 6 o’clock. President Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Treasurer Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Travelers Club January 14- Mrs. L. T. Meachum
Music- Mrs. Austin and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Misses Vera Saxe and Nettie Sylvester, who have been enjoying their vacations at their homes in this village returned Monday to Minneapolis to resume their work at Hamline.
G. F. Sylvester, G. H. Dickman and T. G. Bolton went to the Cities Tuesday to attend the State Agricultural meeting in the interest of the Plainview Industrial Fair Association.

January 25, 1907- Travelers January 28 Mrs. F. L. Meachum
"Life of Shakespeare" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

February 15, 1907- Annual meeting of Plainview Canning Company Tuesday February


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19 at 2 o’clock. E. L. Sylvester secretary.

March 8, 1907- Travelers March 11
"The Lake Poets"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited friends in Elgin Wednesday afternoon.

March 13, 1907, Wednesday- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was here. –Dickman Diary.

March 22, 1907- H. S. Play "The Sweet Girl Graduate" Saturday March 23
Miss Maude DeAmythe- the sweet girl, Anna Sylvester
Misses Vera Saxe and Nettie Sylvester came home from Hamline last week to enjoy their spring vacation with their parents and among friends.
Travelers March 25- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Music- Piano Solo- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

March 29, 1907- Misses Nettie Sylvester and Vera Saxe who have been enjoying their spring vacation at home, returned to Minneapolis Tuesday afternoon to resume their studies at Hamline.
C. W. Donaldson, H. D. and Dr. E. E. Smith and G. F. Sylvester went to Winona Thursday afternoon to attend the Rose Croix Banquet. Mr. Sylvester was accompanied by his wife and from there will go to the Cities for a short visit.

April 5, 1907- Travelers at Mrs. G. F. Sylvester April 8
Piano Solo- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
E. L. Sylvester and T. A. Nelson went to Rochester Tuesday afternoon to bring the body of Mrs. Cecelia A. S. Williams to the village for burial. She died at the state hospital on Sunday.

April 12, 1907- At the regular meeting of the Travelers held at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Monday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year. Pres.- Miss Mary Lahey, VP- Miss Elliott, Treasurer- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Sec.- Miss Herbach.

April 17, 1907, Saturday- Leona went to the Whitewater with Mrs. F. Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

April 19, 1907- Mesdames Albert Koenig, Chas Bush, G. F. Sylvester, and Miss Mattie Holzer drove to Rochester Wednesday on a short visit.

May 3, 1907- Miss Meta Sylvester entertained the Modest Bench at her home on W. Broadway Saturday evening April 27…

May 10, 1907- The Ladies Aid of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.
Miss Meta Sylvester entertained the teachers at her home on W. Broadway Wednesday evening.

May 17, 1907- Class of 1907- Meta Sylvester
Women’s Foreign Missionary Society at M. E. Church
3:20 "The Enduring Enthusiasm" Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Plainview.
Miss Meta Sylvester entertained the members of the Senior class at her home on W. Broadway Friday evening.
Epworth Anniversary- Solo Anna Sylvester.

May 31, 1907- "The Merchant of Venice Up-To-Date" –June 3 GAR Hall.
Tubal, his friend and captain of the Belmont Football team- Park Sylvester
Portio, a rich heiress- Meta Sylvester
Admission 25 cents. Reserved seats 35 cents.
The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Wednesday June 5.

June 7, 1907- Commencement Tuesday evening.
Miss Nettie Sylvester vocal solo- "Summer"
Miss Nettie Sylvester returned from Hamline Tuesday evening to be present at the commencement exercises and to spend the summer vacation at home.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has just returned from St. Paul where she has been

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attending school and taking instruction in voice culture under the best directors, is desirous of securing a class in vocal music. She would be pleased to have parties desiring to learn her plan and methods call at her home on W. Broadway. ***

June 21, 1907- Hospital benefit program.
4. Vocal – Miss Sylvester
8. Reading – Meta Sylvester
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, left for Winona yesterday afternoon to attend the district convention of the Banker’s Association to be held in that city Friday and Saturday.

June 28, 1907- Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester and Park Sylvester went to Lake City Wednesday morning to attend the County Sunday School convention as delegates from the Methodist church. They were driven to Kellogg by their brother Byrl and from there took the train to Lake City. Mrs. J. A. LaCraft accompanied them as far as Reeds (NOTE: Reeds Landing, a small town north of Wabasha) where she goes to visit her parents.
The following delegates attended the Epworth League Convention at Chatfield: Misses Anna Sylvester… all report a most profitable meeting and a very pleasant time.

July 12, 1907- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Monday afternoon for St. Paul to attend a meeting of the State Bankers Association.

July 24, 1907, Wednesday- Frank Sylvester and I drove to St. Charles to see the carnival. –Dickman Diary.

July 26, 1907- G. F. Sylvester, William Guthrie and families, and Geo. H. Dickman drove to St. Charles Wednesday and took in the carnival. They were well pleased with the show and entertainments.
The family of E. L. Sylvester left Saturday morning for Camp Schmoker to enjoy their annual outing. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left in the evening.

August 1, 1907- Frank Sylvester and I went to Spring Valley and met by Zumbrota and Kasson in fair to get attractions for our fair. –Dickman Diary.

August 2, 1907- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family who have been spending a few days at Camp Schmoker, returned home Monday. They had delightful weather and enjoyed the outing immensely.
G. F. Sylvester and family leave today for Alexandria on a visit to his sister and family.

August 30, 1907- G. F. Sylvester and family who have been spending the past 10 days at Alexandria, returned home Monday afternoon. They had a delightful time and speak highly of that city and the pretty lakes surrounding it.

September 6, 1907- E. L. Sylvester and son Park and Byrl drove to Kellogg Saturday afternoon and from there left for St. Paul to spend a few days at the fair.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin left Wednesday night on a several weeks visit to relatives in N. Y. state. They were accompanied as far as Eyota by Mr. Sylvester.

September 27, 1907- H. C. Anderson is erecting a large cold storage plant on E. L. Sylvester’s property adjoining the Northwestern tracks. The structure is to be 40 by 100 feet and will have a capacity of 500 tons. This is something that has been needed in Plainview for some time and should be valuable to produce raisers. (NOTE: With the

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increase of "truck farming" in Plainview that grew 3-4 acre fields of cabbage, onions, or sugar beets, there was a growing need of storage before shipping them to market. Many times they would be held in storage waiting for the price to raise.)

October 4, 1907- Travelers Club will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Monday October 7 at 7:30.
"The Oldest city in the United States" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Wednesday evening to meet his wife, who returned from a trip to New York state Thursday.

October 11, 1907- Fair results- Painting and drawing, division H.
Collection China Paintings- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Chip Plate- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Water color Painting- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester- First

October 25, 1907- Park Sylvester, who has been spending the past few months in North Dakota, returned home Monday night.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, C. H. Bush, Albert Koenig, Milton Leinginger, and Miss Anna Sylvester drove to Rochester Saturday.

November 1, 1907- Travelers Club Mrs. Venables November 4
"Piano Duet" Mrs. Austin & Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

November 15, 1907- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Wednesday morning on a visit to relatives.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and Albert Koenig spent Tuesday afternoon with friends in Elgin.
The Priscillas will give a Backward Party next Friday evening at the G. A. R. Hall. Admission 15 cents for everybody.

November 29, 1907- Thanksgiving program given by 3rd, 4th and 5th grade Wednesday afternoon.
Recitation "A Thanksgiving Lesson" Katherine Sylvester
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter visited in Rochester Saturday.
The "Backward Party" is a week behind time, but its here and don’t miss it tonight at the G. A. R. Hall.

December 6, 1907- Miss Meta Sylvester came home from Hamline Wednesday to spend her vacation.
Meta Sylvester who enjoyed her vacation at home, returned to Hamline Monday morning.

December 13, 1907- Travelers Club December 16, Mrs. Mallory
"Adam’s Administration" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

December 20, 1907- The Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester, Vera Saxe, and Jerry Baldwin are expected home today to spend their holiday vacation.

December 27, 1907- Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester who are attending Hamline University arrived home last Friday night to spend the holidays with relatives and friends.

=== [ 1908 ] ===

January 10, 1908- Travelers Club January 13, Mrs. Austin
Piano Duet- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Mrs. Austin
"Battle of Shiloh" –Mrs. E. L. Sylvester

January 17, 1908- A company of friends were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Tuesday evening.
The M. E. Aid Society met with Mrs. G. R. Hall Wednesday afternoon. Officers elected… Mrs. E. L. Sylvester treasurer.

January 22, 1908, Wednesday- Emma and I went to E. L. Sylvester’s to a 6 o’clock

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dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Burchard and Marshall’s and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester came over here after supper. –Dickman Diary.

January 24, 1908- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at their home on West Broadway Wednesday evening at a 6 o’clock dinner. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by the guests.
Travelers Meeting January 27- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Vocal Solo- Anna Sylvester
"McKinley’s Administration" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Instrumental Solo- Mrs. Austin, Mrs. Sylvester, Miss Shaughnessey

February 7, 1908- Meeting of Greenwood Prairie Telephone Company Saturday February 1 G. A. R. Hall. Board of Directors… E. L. Sylvester…

February 21, 1908- Old Settlers. E. L. Sylvester elected secretary
Travelers Club- February 24, Mrs. Grove
"Education in the East" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester

March 6, 1908- E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Elba Monday.

March 13, 1908- Village election. E. L. Sylvester 246 votes for treasurer.

March 20, 1908- Travelers March 23, G. F. Sylvester
Instrumental Solo- Mrs. Austin, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester & Miss Shaughnessey
Among those from here who went over to Elgin Wednesday afternoon to the Commercial Club meeting were: C. D. Burchard, E. L. Sylvester, G. H. Dickman and F. L. Gilbert.
The Ladies Aid of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon.
G. F. Sylvester, William Mack, J. Thompson and I attended the school board meeting in Wabasha. We drove to Weaver and took the train from there. We got back about 10:30. –Dickman Diary.

March 27, 1908- The Women’s Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester April 3rd at the usual hour.
The Misses Vera Saxe, Nettie and Meta Sylvester came down from Minneapolis Saturday to enjoy the spring vacation at home.

April 3, 1908- Geo. F. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Anna, left Saturday for Oberlin, Ohio where the latter will enter the Oberlin College.
The Misses Vera Saxe, Nettie and Meta Sylvester returned to Minneapolis Tuesday morning to resume their studies at Hamline.
Travelers Club April 6- Mrs. Strubles. "American magazines and their influence on literature" Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

April 17, 1908- Canning Factory Meeting. 15 stockholders joined together. E. L. Sylvester treasurer.
Travelers Club April 20, Mrs. H. G. Austin, Piano Duet "Mocking Bird" by Hoffman- Mesdames Austin and G. F. Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester and Earl Southwick left Tuesday morning for Buffalo, New York on a business trip and will be absent several days.

April 24, 1908- Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, C. H. Bush, H. D. Smith and Albert Koenig drove to Minneiska Wednesday morning where they took the train for Winona to spend the day in the city.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, went to the Cities this Friday morning on a short visit to her daughter, Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester and Earl Southwick returned from their trip to Buffalo, New York Sunday.

May 1, 1908- At an entertainment given by the freshmen of Hamline University to the Juniors at the Wes Hotel in Minneapolis last Tuesday evening, among those who

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responded to toasts, we notice the name of Miss Meta Sylvester of this place.
Travelers May 4, Mrs. Washburn, "Uncle Sam’s New America?" Mrs. Sylvester.

May 15, 1908- Travelers Club May 18, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. H. D. Smith, and Miss Bessie Smith drove to Minneiska Monday morning were they took the train for Winona to attend a special meeting of the Eastern Star.

May 21, 1908, Thursday- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and us went to the Catholic Church in the evening. –Dickman Diary.

May 29, 1908- Graduation Program.
Oration "Kein Sieg Ohne Arbert" Anna Sylvester.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained Friday evening for Mesdames Thompson and Calendar.
Miss Anna Sylvester very pleasantly entertained the members of the Senior class and her former and present teachers at a 6 o’clock dinner last Monday evening. The class colors and flowers were used in decorations. After an enjoyable half hour of music by the hostess and her little sisters, several Kodak pictures of the guests were taken.

June 5, 1908- Graduation class- Theresa Melvin, Anna S. Sylvester, Ida A. Reiter.
Anna Sylvester had as a subject of her oration the class motto "Klein Sieg Ohne Arbeit" No victory without labor. Showing herself to be an elocutionist of no mean ability.
Miss Meta Sylvester and friend, Roy Holmes, came down from Hamline Saturday on a short visit to her parents returning Sunday afternoon.
Mrs. E.L. Sylvester and son Byrl, visited Rochester Monday afternoon.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a number of lady friends Wednesday evening.

June 12, 1908- Supt. and Mrs. W. P. Dyer of Alexandria arrived Saturday on a visit to her brothers Edwin and Frank Sylvester and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Monday afternoon for LaCrosse, Wisconsin to attend the Banker’s Convention.

June 19, 1908- Ball game, Substitute- Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter Miss Meta drove to Minneiska Tuesday morning and there took the steamer LaCrosse to Winona where they spent the day returning in the evening. They speak very highly of Capt. Wilcox’s new boat and informed us that they are now serving meals on the boat.
The Misses Nettie and Meta Sylvester returned from Hamline last Thursday to spend the summer vacation.

June 26, 1908- Wedding of Miss Meta Sylvester and Mr. Roy Joseph Holmes.
Miss Meta Sylvester and Mr. Roy Joseph Holmes were united in marriage at high noon Thursday June 25th, 1908 at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
They Sylvester home was handsomely decorated for the occasion. Smilax festoons were stretched from the bay window arch, were hung a wedding bell of white roses. White ribbons draped with smilax and roses decorated the parlor.
Promptly at the appointed hour to the strains of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March played by King Holmes, the bridal party advanced, lead by Alice Dyer as flower girl and Marion Sylvester as ring bearer. The bride followed on the arm of her father, taking their places beneath the arch. Here they were met by the groom, and the pastor Rev. Lincoln Hughes, who pronounced the words, which made them man and wife. Miss Nettie Sylvester then sweetly sang, "Beloved, It is Morn". Miss Charlotte Boller acted as bridesmaid and Mr. Edwin Kachel acted as groomsman. The bride’s gown was of silk mull, trimmed with real lace, and she carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses, the groom wearing an evening dress suit.

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After the ceremony congratulations were immediately in order and were spontaneous and sincere.
A wedding dinner, consisting of five courses, served by the bride’s sister, Miss Nettie, assisted by Leona and Vera Dickman. The color scheme of the dining room was pink carnations with white and pink ribbons.
A fine array of presents attest the esteem of which the young folks are held and will serve as life long mementos.
This marriage takes away a popular and accomplished you lady, who was born and brought up in this village and who will be greatly missed for her sweet personality as well as for her elocutionary ability. Mr. Holmes, a young man of her choice, is a resident of St. Paul and he is spoken of very highly by everyone who knows him, as a capable our man, worthy of his good fortune in winning his bride.
Mr. and Mrs. Holmes will go to St. Paul and spend the summer at the lake. They will be at home to their friends in St. Paul after September first.
The event marks the most important mile stone in the lives of these you people. Another home is made, a new start in life is commenced and circumstances. We wish them long life and bespeak for them much happiness.

July 3, 1908- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Anna went to Austin Friday on a visit to friends.

July 10, 1908- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Anna left for Oak Park Thursday on a visit to her mother and friends. On her return she will be met at St. Paul by her husband, where they will attend the Shriner’s Convention.

July 17, 1908- Geo. F. Sylvester, H. D. Smith, Dr. E. E. Smith, and James A. Carley drove to the river road Sunday where they took the train for St. Paul where the three former will spend the greater part of the week at the big Shriner’s Convention, while the later will join them as soon as his official work at Wabasha is complete.

July 24, 1908- P. C. Wood and G. F. Sylvester were again elected to the board of education.
Miss Louise Caldwell who has been visiting the past month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, departed Wednesday afternoon for St. Paul.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester who have been attending the Shriner’s Convention at St. Paul, returned home last Friday.
Mrs. W. P. Dyer, who has been the guest of her brothers E. L. and G. F. Sylvester for the past few weeks, returned to her home in Alexandria last Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester departed Wednesday for Duluth, where the former goes to attend the State Banking Convention. They were accompanied by their son, Byrl, who will visit with his sister, Mrs. Roy Holmes, at the Cities.

August 7, 1908- The Plainview State Bank has recently installed a most convenient machine to their many bank facilities. It’s a Brandt’s Automatic Cashier and is an ideal convenience in making small change. The simple touch of a key will give the accurate change to a penny in any denominations up to $1.00.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who have been attending the state Bankers Convention at Duluth and enjoying an outing on Lake Superior, returned home Saturday.

August 21, 1908- Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes came down from Minneapolis Saturday on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester made a short visit in Rochester Tuesday.
G. F. Sylvester and family left Thursday morning for Camp Schmoker to enjoy a weeks outing.

August 28, 1908- E. L. Sylvester and family left Thursday morning for Camp Schmoker to enjoy a weeks outing on the river.
G. F. Sylvester and family, who have been enjoying a weeks outing on the river,

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returned home Wednesday.

September 4, 1908- The M. E. Aid Society will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday.
F. L. Gilbert and G. F. Sylvester went to Zumbrota Wednesday morning on a trip in the interest of the Plainview Street fair.
(Frank Sylvester of Wadena, who has been visiting at the home of Jacob Haessig departed for his home Monday morning.)

September 12, 1908- Miss Anna Sylvester left Wednesday evening for Oberlin, Ohio where she will attend college. She was accompanied on the trip by her father, G. F. Sylvester.
Miss Nettie Sylvester left for Hamline Monday afternoon where she will again take up her studies at the University.

September 25, 1908- Word from Farley on the death of C. C. Sylvester, an early pioneer of Woodland and an uncle of E. L. and G. F. Sylvester, who passed away Sunday night after suffering a month with cancer of the stomach. His daughter, Mrs. Haycraft went to Port Arthur, Texas a few weeks ago and brought him back to Farley for relief. He seemed to improve in health for a time but took a rapid turn for the worse and died as above noted.
Mr. Sylvester was a member of the Masonic order and had been in vigorous health until he became affected with cancer. His remains were taken to his old home, Madelia, for interment.

October 2, 1908- Travelers Club, September 28- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
No program has been prepared but the new book and magazine were distributed, the first two chapters of the history read and the lessons assigned for the next meeting. Our work this year is to be a study of France as planned by the Bay View Reading Club and promises to be full of interest.

October 5, 1908, Monday- Emma and I was invited to C. D. Burchard’s 32nd wedding anniversary. Those present were F. L. Meachum’s, A. Marshall’s, Geo. Dickman’s, S. S. Lyons’, E. L. Sylvester’s, E. R. Cornwell’s, T. A. Askew’s, Dr. Slocumb’s, W. G. Mack’s, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. The party was held in the Slocumb house. –Dickman Diary.

October 9, 1908- Street Fair result. China painting, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, $1.00.
Large China Pitcher- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, $1.00.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon.

October 23, 1908- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon.
A. S. Kennedy an expert book keeper of Rochester, has accepted a position in the Plainview Bank and commenced upon his duties this week.

October 30, 1908- Mesdames J. A. Slocumb and G. F. Sylvester spend Friday in Rochester.
The following Plainview citizens attended the hearing of the will of Levi Sexton at Wabasha Monday… E. L. Sylvester.

November 13, 1908- Marion Sylvester of the second grade is visiting her sister Anna at Oberlin (School News)

November 20, 1908- Travelers November 23, Mrs. McKenney
Paper "Richelieu – Statesman and Courtier," Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester on December 2.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Winona Friday afternoon.

November 27, 1908- Byrl Sylvester left for Minneapolis Wednesday afternoon to spend a few days with his sisters and to attend the big football game.

December 4, 1908- G. F. Sylvester left for St. Paul Thursday morning on a business trip.

December 18, 1908- Held Holiday Festival
The Travelers pleasantly entertained at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

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The Travelers are an industrious studious people, but they need occasional recreation consequently Mrs. G. F. Sylvester opened her home to them on Monday evening where they held their holiday festival in the form of a 6 o’clock dinner.
The rooms were prettily decorated, especially the dining hall showing forth the colors of the club- green and pink.
Covers were placed for 22, the members being seated at the banquet table. Miss French invoked Divine blessing upon the assembled members and upon the home represented.
During the progress of the feast the following musical program was tendered, the numbers being interspersed between courses.
Piano Solo- Miss Shaughnessy
Vocal Solo- Miss Trisler
Vocal Trio- Austin, LaCraft, Trisler
Piano Solo- "Spinning Wheel" Godard- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Vocal Solo- Mrs. Austin
The several courses having been served, toasts were given, our worthy president, Miss Elliot, acting as toast mistress. The first toast- the occasion – was responded to by Miss French, beginning her remarks with the old adage "A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men." Miss French gave a glowing picture of the vast difference between the facial expression of the members when seated at the festive board and that depicted in their countenances when called upon to answer a question in French history.
The truly social and humorous side of the evening may be demonstrated by the fact that when Miss French was called to the telephone, that the County Superintendent might announce a teacher’s meeting, our worthy Superintendent of Schools remarked that she did "wish there would be one evening’s entertainment when school questions were not in evidence."
The next toast "The Travelers" was given by Miss Robinson. She gave a resume of the strides the members had made since the beginning of the year- covering a period of over 1,000 years of mastering (?) the intricacies of the French pronunciation, and of other wonderful achievements.
Mrs. McKenney called upon the muse and fancy presented to her the old school house with all its myriad recollections. Among those brought before her vision was Myrtle Mallory Bolton. When called upon to recite her lesson, she would say "I don’t know, but Melvin does." (NOTE: Melvin was her twin brother.) Kate Shaughnessy on hearing the name of a new pupil from the country- Miss Furlong, immediately dubbed her, Miss Forty Rods, and thus did fancy weave her chair of happy memories about many of those present.
Miss Nickerson arose in response to the toast "Our President." She spoke of presidents of the great corporations, presidents of charitable institutions, presidents of Universities, and presidents of nations. Who would not wish to have his name mentioned with that of Washington, Roosevelt, Taft? Again, who would not wish to be listed with those of French, Schaughnesy, Lahey?
Miss Elliot-
"Long May she reign
And happy may she be."
The president then proposed toasts to the hostess and to the committee on arrangement, which were responded to heartily by all.
At fifteen minutes before nine o’clock, the company withdrew to the parlors where an impromptu program was given.
When the time came to say goodbye, all voted this to be one of the most enjoyable evenings in the history of the Travelers Club.

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Miss Nettie Sylvester sang at First Church St. Paul Sunday morning. Miss Sylvester is one of the best soprano singers in the city. She is a senior at Hamline University and has held a position on the Hamline Quartet for the past 3 years. She leaves on Friday for her home in Plainview to spend the holiday vacation. – St. Paul Dispatch.
Christmas Program at M. E. Church Dec. 24
Solo- Anna Sylvester
Dialog- Marion Sylvester, Ella Bolton, Helen Posz, Katherine Sylvester, Mary Austin
Violin Selection- Mr. Roy Holmes
Solo- Nettie Sylvester
Reading- Mrs. Roy Holmes
Recitation- Edwin Sylvester

December 25, 1908-
A Delightful Evening
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Entertain at a Musical Wednesday
A large company of guest enjoyed an informal musical at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester on Wednesday evening, given by their daughter, Miss Nettie, Mrs. Roy Holmes, and Mr. Roy Holmes: Miss Vera Saxe assisted at the piano.
Miss Sylvester sang several selections and her sweet soprano voice was admired from those present. Mr. Holmes on the violin is a master and his selections seemed all too short for the listener. Mrs. Holmes’ readings were such that gave life and merriment to all. Her child reading simply captivated all and during the evening several guests could not help but remark "I’d rather eat at the second table" and "that isn’t the worst of it." The young people are delightful artists and their efforts certainly pleased everyone. We doubt if the party gathered at the spacious home ever spent a more pleasant evening or more fully appreciated the splendid concert.
We give below the program rendered which was heartily encored, each number graciously responding to the hearty call of more.
Cavatina- Demuth- Roy L. Holmes
Carmena Waltz Song- Miss Nettie Sylvester
Reading- Selected- Mrs. Roy Holmes
Love Song- Violin Solo- Roy L. Holmes
Rose Song- Miss Nettie Sylvester
Reading- Selected- Mrs. Roy Holmes
Romance at Bolero- Roy L. Holmes
Annie Laurie- Miss Nettie Sylvester
Lullaby- Mr. Roy L. Holmes
At the rendition of the most delightful program, light refreshments were served. It is indeed a pleasure for the home folks to meet these young people who are visiting in the village during the holidays. The only regret is that their stay among us is so short.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Holmes of St. Paul arrived Monday night to be the guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester during the holidays.
Miss Nettie Sylvester came home from Minneapolis Thursday night to spend the holidays with her parents.
Miss Anna Sylvester who is attending Oberlin College, arrived Wednesday to enjoy the holidays at the home of her parents.

=== [ 1909 ] ===

January 1, 1909- Should Women Vote? Women’s suffrage is becoming a much talked

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of subject- and the wonder is that it has not been more thoroughly advocated before!
Roy Holmes, who has been enjoying a few days among relatives, departed for his home at St. Paul Monday. His wife will remain for a few days longer.
Byrl Sylvester and Tom Askew went to Winona Wednesday morning to spend the remainder of the week with their friend, Louis Thom.

January 8, 1909- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner New Years eve.
Mrs. Roy Holmes who has been spending the holidays at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, returned to her home at St. Paul Monday.
Miss Nettie Sylvester returned to Minneapolis Monday to resume her studies at Hamline.
Miss Anna Sylvester returned to Oberlin Monday to resume her studies.

January 22, 1909- Miss Anna Sylvester, who is attending college at Oberlin, Ohio, came home Monday evening for a short rest.

February 5, 1909- Miss Anna Sylvester, who has been spending a few days at home, returned to Oberlin, Ohio last Thursday to resume her studies.

February 12, 1909- G. F. Sylvester and F. L. Gilbert wend to the Cities Wednesday afternoon in the interests of the Wabasha County Industrial Fair Association.
Mrs. Roy Holmes came down from St. Paul Wednesday on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. It took her all day to get from the Cities here owing to the lateness of the trains.

February 19, 1909- Mrs. Roy Holmes, who has been spending a few days in the village in the interest of her candidacy in the Pioneer Press Contests, returned to her home at St. Paul Monday. Her efforts here were awarded with good success, she having received nearly a million votes and we believe her Plainview friends who have not yet learned of the contest will give her liberal assistance. So far in the contest she is well in the lead.

February 26, 1909- Basketball game- Byrl Sylvester right guard. 27 to 11 loss to St. Charles.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a few friends at an informal but handsomely appointed dinner Monday evening.
E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Monday evening on a business trip, returning home Tuesday afternoon.

March 2, 1909, Tuesday- Emma and I was invited to G. F. Sylvester’s for supper. Those present Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, Mack’s, J. Thompson’s, Miss Trisler, Emma and I. –Dickman Diary.

March 5, 1909- Marion Sylvester had perfect in spelling in second grade this week. –School News.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a company of friends Tuesday evening at a 6 o’clock dinner.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left last week for St. Paul on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Roy Holmes.

March 12, 1909- Mrs. R. J. Holmes lucky one in the Pioneer Press Popular Contest
Prize- $4,000 bungalow in Warrendale near Como Park. Received 26 million votes.
Katherine Sylvester was surprised by a number of her little friends last Friday evening.
E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul Friday morning on a visit to his daughter, Mrs. Roy Holmes, and to be present at the closing of the Pioneer Press Contest. He returned Monday afternoon accompanied by his sons, Edwin and Byrl.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester very pleasantly entertained at a March Birthday Party Saturday afternoon. There were 17 ladies present and each guest was requested to

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relate some story of happening on their birthday. Several unique incidents were related and judging from reports all present certainly enjoyed the occasion.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Wednesday from a two weeks visit with her daughter at St. Paul.

March 16, 1909, Tuesday- Went to St. Paul to the auto show. In the evening we all went to Minneapolis and went to see "Ben Hur." Dr. and Mrs. Slocumb, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mr. Edwards, Woodcock, Franklin and I. –Dickman Diary.

March 17, 1909, Wednesday- We took in the Auto Show. G. F. Sylvester, Woodcock and I bought three 5 passenger cars. We came home on the 9 o’clock train. –Dickman Diary.

March 19, 1909- Among those who left for the Cities Tuesday morning for the purpose of attending the automobile show were the following: Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Slocumb, W. G. Edwards, A. C. Woodcock, Henry Sexton, and Franklin Dickman. There is no question but Plainview will see a number of new machines this spring.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon.
Miss Katherine Sylvester entertained about 30 of her little friends Saturday at a birthday party, it being her 10th birthday.
Those from here who have been in attendance at the Auto show returned home Wednesday evening. G. H. Dickman, G. F. Sylvester and A. C. Woodcock each purchased a No. 17 Buick 5 passenger car.

March 29, 1909, Monday- I went to an auto meeting in the evening. We formed a club. Dr. Smith President, Geo Dickman VP, Chamberlain Sec., and G. F. Sylvester Treas. –Dickman Diary.

April 2, 1909- At the village hall last Monday evening, the Plainview Automobile Club was organized with the following 13 charter members… G. F. Sylvester… Officers elected. President –Dr. E. E. Smith, VP –Geo. Dickman, Sec. –W. R. Chamberlain, Treasurer –G. F. Sylvester…
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Saturday from a weeks visit in the cities.

April 9, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of lady friends Tuesday afternoon at a birthday party.

April 16, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday morning to spend the day.

April 23, 1909- Byrl Sylvester is absent from school on account of illness. –School News.
E. L. Sylvester left Monday afternoon on a business trip to St. Paul.

May 14, 1909- Perfect spelling- Marion Sylvester. –School News.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, G. H. Bush, and A. A. Marshall drove to the river Saturday and took the train to Winona.
Mesdames M. J. Manchester and E. L. Sylvester went to Minneapolis Tuesday to attend the State meeting of the Order of Eastern Star as delegates.

May 21, 1909- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Waseca Thursday to attend the district meeting of the Federation of Women’s Clubs as a representative of the Plainview Travelers.

May 28, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a number of lady friends last Thursday afternoon at a Thimble Bee. A delicious dinner was served at 6 o’clock.
We acknowledge an invitation this week from Miss Nettie Sylvester to attend the commencement of the Senior class of Hamline University which takes place June 6 to 9. Among the graduates who are known here are Miss Ethel Ackerman, Miss Vera Mae Saxe, and Miss Nettie H. Sylvester.
Travelers hold last session at home of Mrs. H. G. Austin
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester read her paper given before the district Federation of

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Women’s Clubs held at Waseca. Her topic was "What We as Club Women Stand for in Educational Life." It was full of thought to inspire us to even more onward and upward in our march toward the development of a higher, noble and grander womanhood.
Officers- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester- treasurer.
Program Piano duet "Rigadon" Chaminade, Mrs. Sylvester and Mrs. Austin
Piano Solo- Op. 30 Air De Ballet Chaminade, Mrs. Sylvester
Piano Trio- "A night in June," Sudds, Mrs. Austin, Miss Sylvester, Miss Shaughnessey.

June 4, 1909- Beatly Lillie left Tuesday afternoon for Warner Canada where he will spend the summer on his father’s farm. He was accompanied to Eyota by his mother, Mrs. S. J. Lillie, 2 sisters Mrs. Park Sylvester and Miss Avis and Mrs. Mable Schleicher.
Byrl Sylvester left for the Cities Thursday afternoon to be present at the commencement exercises at the Hamline University.

June 11, 1909- E. L. Sylvester went to Winona last Thursday evening where he attended the Banker’s Convention.
E. L. Sylvester left Saturday afternoon for the Cities to be present at the Hamline University Graduation exercises. His daughter Miss Nettie, being a member of the class.

June 18, 1909- Miss Anna Sylvester returned Saturday from Oberlin, Ohio where she has been attending college to spend the summer vacation at home.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Monday for Minneapolis to attend the State Bankers Meeting and spend a few days among friends.

June 25, 1909- Miss Anna Sylvester went to Albert Lea Saturday morning to attend the Epworth League Convention.

July 2, 1909- Miss Nettie Sylvester leaves Saturday for Chicago to fill a position at the Northwestern Conservatory of Music.
Dr. J. P. Caldwell of Minneapolis spent Thursday and Friday at the home of E. L. Sylvester.
Miss Anna Sylvester returned the latter part of last week from Albert Lea where she was in attendance at the Epworth League Convention.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul Wednesday morning on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. R. Holmes and to get acquainted with her little grandson. (NOTE: Merle)

July 9, 1909- G. F. Sylvester took his family and Mrs. Palmer and children to Rochester Thursday afternoon in his auto as a pleasure trip.
E. L. Sylvester spent Sunday and Monday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes in St. Paul returning home Thursday.

July 16, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and sons Byrl and Edwin returned from the Cities Saturday evening where they have been spending a few weeks at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes.
We took the auto and went to Rochester. We got over there before the train got to Rochester. We came home at 9 o’clock. Byrl Sylvester went along with us. We went over to see the Glidden Auto Tour Cars. All the autos in town went over. –Dickman Diary.

July 23, 1909- G. F. Sylvester, secretary of the Wabasha County Industrial Fair Association, held an interview with the writer one day this week in regard to the Street Fair to be held…
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester took her Sunday School class to Minnieska Wednesday where the you people enjoyed a picnic.

July 28, 1909, Wednesday- We took and Auto ride in the evening and took Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester along. –Dickman Diary.

July 30, 1909- Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been spending some time at Evanston, Ill. returned home Saturday.

August 6, 1909- G. F. Sylvester and family left Wednesday morning for Oak Park on a

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visit to relatives where they will spend a week. They are making the trip in their auto.
Miss Annie Secombe, who has recently returned from an European tour, stopped off here last week on a short visit to her friend and former chum, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. She formerly resided at Milaca where her and Mrs. Sylvester spent many happy days. It is needless to say that the visit was one of great enjoyment to both ladies.
G. F. Sylvester went to Minneapolis Sunday afternoon where he spent Monday attending to business matters.

August 13, 1909- Misses Nettie Sylvester who has been spending a week with relatives and friends in the Cities, returned home Friday.

August 19, 1909, Thursday- Franklin and Byrl Sylvester went to Oronoco today to stay over Sunday. –Dickman Diary.

August 20, 1909- Franklin Dickman and Byrl Sylvester left Thursday afternoon for Oronoco, where they will enjoy a few days of camp life.

August 23, 1909- Franklin and Byrl came back from Oronoco on the 9 o’clock train. –Dickman Diary.

August 27, 1909- E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Monday evening on a business trip.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Camp Schmoker Wednesday to enjoy a few days fishing.
Miss Kate Shaughnessey, Mrs. John Dobritz, and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday afternoon on a short visit to friends.

September 2, 1909, Thursday- We went to Winona in our Auto. At noon it started to rain. We came home on the train. We had to leave the car. So did Dr. Slocumb, Sylvester, and Woodcock. –Dickman Diary.

September 3, 1909- Mrs. R. W. Chapman, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter Miss Nettie spent Monday in Winona.

September 4, 1909, Saturday- Franklin, Stricker, Woodcock, Manchester, Sylvester went to Winona on the evening train to get our Autos we left down there on account of rain. –Dickman Diary.

September 10, 1909- Miss Nettie Sylvester left Thursday afternoon for Park Rapids, where she has been engaged as instructor in music in the school of that city.
Mr. and Mrs. Park Sylvester left for St. Paul Monday on a visit to relatives.
Dr. Caldwell of Minneapolis was a guest at the home of E. L. Sylvester several days last week.
Miss Anna Sylvester left Saturday evening for Oberlin, Ohio, to resume her studies in the college at that city. She was accompanied as far as Winona by her father.
Park Sylvester has moved his family into the Rock farm purchased this spring by his father.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, very pleasantly entertained a large company of friends at a musical Saturday evening at the home of her parents on W. Broadway.
Street Fair – Supt. of painting and drawing – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

September 17, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Thursday afternoon for Park Rapids, being called there by the illness of her daughter, Miss Nettie.
Herman Schwantz, Herman Hostettler, and Park Sylvester and Will Rock returned from their Canadian trip Tuesday morning. Messrs. Schwantz and Sylvester each purchased a quarter section of land near Lethbridge. They are well pleased with that country and think it an ideal farming country.

September 24, 1909- G. F. Sylvester ran down to Kellogg Wednesday morning taking his wife to meet the early train, making the run in 40 minutes. Mrs. Sylvester spent the day at Lake City in attendance at the Federation of Women’s Club.

October 1, 1909- Mrs. Edwin Sylvester returned Saturday evening from Park Rapids where she was called by the illness of her daughter, Nettie, who is now much improved.

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Mrs. R. Holmes arrived from St. Paul Tuesday evening on a visit to her parents.

October 15, 1909- Travelers Oct. 25, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mrs. R. Holmes, who has been spending some time at the home of her parents, returned to St. Paul Thursday. She was accompanied as far as Rochester by her mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mesdames Bush, Austin, and Klaveter enjoyed a trip to Rochester Friday afternoon in the former’s auto.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester very pleasantly entertained a company of friends last Friday in honor of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes, who has been a guest at the parental home for the past several weeks.

October 17, 1909, Sunday- In the afternoon callers were Mr. and Mrs. G. Sylvester, Mr. and Mrs. F. Petrich, Mrs. M. Dickman, Mrs. Posz and daughter. –Dickman Diary.

October 22, 1909- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Monday in Rochester.

October 24, 1909, Sunday- After dinner Frank Sylvester and family, Mr. Troutman and Mrs. Buswell and our family took an Auto ride to Potsdam, Hammond, Lake City, Reads, Wabasha, Kellogg, home. We had supper at Wabasha. –Dickman Diary.

October 29, 1909- Byrl Sylvester and Alvin Dickman left for St. Paul yesterday to spend a few days with friends and to attend the football game at Minneapolis.
Messrs. and Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and H. G. Austin went to Rochester last Thursday evening to attend the play put on by the Elks Lodge making the trip in the former’s auto.
Travelers November 8- Mrs. Burchard
Special Topic "Dresden Chinaware" Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to the Cities Saturday at the same time paying a visit to his daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes at St. Paul and Miss Nettie at Park Rapids, returning home Monday.
The families of G. F. Sylvester and G. H. Dickman enjoyed an auto trip to Lake City and Wabasha Sunday and report the roads in very good condition.
Ben Rohweder, Ed. Sylvester, Franklin and I took the Auto and went to Weaver hunting ducks. We stayed over night in a tent. –Dickman Diary.

October 31, 1909, Sunday- Alvin and Byrl are up to the Cities. –Dickman Diary.

November 5, 1909- G. H. Dickman, E. L. Sylvester, B. E. Rohweder, and Franklin Dickman spent Friday night at the river and brought back a few ducks.
Perfect in third grade spelling- Marion Sylvester- School News.

November 12, 1909- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a very enjoyable function at their home last Thursday afternoon and evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Lee T. Meachum who left Monday afternoon for California. At 6 o’clock an elaborate course dinner was served by the hostess to which ample justice was accorded to all. As the company departed for their home, all expressed their regrets for the departure of Mr. and Mrs. Meachum from our midst.
Perfect 3rd grade speller- Marion Sylvester- School News.

November 26, 1909- Travelers December 6- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Music Miss Carhart, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. J. A. Slocumb.

December 3, 1909- A. E. Kennedy marries Waseca Lady
Miss Nettie Sylvester returned Monday from Park Rapids, where she has been instructor of music in the school of that city since the beginning of the school year. She was obliged to give up the position owing to poor health.

December 17, 1909- Travelers at Mrs. C. D. Burchard- 6 o’clock tea
Piano duet- Mrs. Austin and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mrs. P. D. Sylvester left Thursday morning for St. Paul and a visit to relatives.

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Miss Anna Sylvester who has been attending college at Detroit Michigan, returned home Wednesday to remain during the holidays.
The Sophomore class had a class party Thursday evening at the home of Byrl Sylvester.

December 31, 1909- Travelers January 3- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
Music- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Miss Palmer, Miss Nettie Sylvester.

=== [ 1910 ] ===

January 7, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester returned Monday from Winona where she sang Sunday morning and evening at the Central Methodist Church.
The deferred meeting of the Travelers will be merged with the next regular meeting which will be held at the home of Mrs. E. L. Sylvester January 17, 1910. The program will appear in next weeks NEWS.

January 14, 1910- Travelers will meet January 17 with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
Music- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. Palmer, Miss Nettie Sylvester.
G. F. Sylvester, T. G. Bolton, and C. D. Burchard left for St. Paul Wednesday to attend the meeting of the State Agricultural Societies as delegates from Wabasha County Industrial Fair Association.

January 21, 1910- Travelers- January 31- Mrs. H. G. Austin.
"Politics in Austria Hungary:"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

January 28, 1910- Mrs. Park Sylvester and little daughter who have been spending a few weeks at the home of her parents, returned to Minneapolis Saturday morning.

February 4, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester went to St. Paul Saturday on a visit to her sister and friends.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Winona Monday.

February 9, 1910, Wednesday- Emma and I went to a party at W. G. Mack’s in honor of my birthday. Those present: Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, J. A. Slocumb’s, LaCraft’s, T. A. Askew’s, Abe Marshall’s, Miller Bolton’s, J. Manchester’s, Chas. Bush’s, A. C. Woodcock’s, F. D. Washburn’s, C. D. Burchard’s, W. G. Mack’s and Emma and I. –Dickman Diary.

February 11, 1910- Annual Meeting of Greenwood Prairie Telephone Company. Directors: J. A. Carley, E. L. Sylvester, L. E. Ryan, Frank Appel and M. A. Nelson.
E. L. Sylvester went to Winona and Wabasha Tuesday to attend business matters.

February 18, 1910- Old Settlers Meeting- E. L. Sylvester reelected Secretary.

February 21, 1910, Monday- Went to Minneapolis in the afternoon to the Auto Show. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Byrl were there too. –Dickman Diary.

February 25, 1910- Travelers- February 28- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. This lesson finishes the book on Austrian Hungarian History and while it has proven one of the most interesting studies pursued by the club in sometime, we are looking forward with pleasing anticipation to the completion of the book on "pictures."
The committee on programs has prepared and presented some most excellent programs, giving ample time to each member to prepare their special part.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been spending sometime at St. Paul, accompanied her parents home Wednesday morning.
Geo. H. Dickman, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl left Saturday for the Cities where they will visit with friends and attend the auto show.

March 11, 1910- Mrs. P. D. Sylvester, who has been spending some time at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Lillie, returned to St. Paul Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family left for the Cities Wednesday morning on

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a few days visit.

March 18, 1910- Park Sylvester came down from St. Paul the first of the week on a visit to relatives and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family returned from their visit to Minneapolis Friday.
Callers Miss Sylvester, Mother, Mrs. McGee, Anna Sylvester. –Dickman Diary.

March 25, 1910- S. J. Lillie, Park Sylvester, and Jerry & Clifford Baldwin left Tuesday with 2 car loads of stock and machinery for Warner Canada to begin work on their land.
A fire alarm Thursday afternoon called the fire department to the home of E. L. Sylvester, where one corner of the woodshed had caught fire from the burning of rubbish. The blaze was extinguished before the arrival of the company. People cannot be too careful at this time of the year when burning this rubbish.

April 3, 1910, Sunday- In the afternoon we went to Rochester in our Auto. Adolph Zabel’s family and G. F. Sylvester’s went along too. –Dickman Diary.

April 8, 1910- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Nettie visited in Rochester Saturday.
E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, went to St. Paul last Friday on a few days visit. Mr. Sylvester returned home Tuesday night while Byrl will return later in the week accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Roy Holmes.
Last week E. L. Sylvester disposed of the Phillip Conners farm north of the village known as the Welles place to J. T. Fisk of Cook Valley.

April 15, 1910- The bond of E. L. Sylvester as treasurer in the sum of $6,000 with Oliver Nelson and G. H. Dickman as securities was read and motion approved. (Village meeting).

April 22, 1910- A Happy Home Event on Friday
Miss Anna Sylvester is Bride at Beautiful Home Wedding on Last Friday
A Pleasant Affair
Groom is Rodolphus Baker of Missoula, Montana – Only Immediate Relatives at the Wedding
A beautiful home wedding was solemnized last Friday morning, April 15th, at the home of MR. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester of this city, when their daughter Miss Anna Secombe Sylvester was joined in holy wedlock to Rodolphus James Rodney Baker of Missoula, Montana.
Just preceding the wedding ceremony, Miss Nettie Sylvester, cousin of the bride, very sweetly sang "Because" (by Teschmacher). At 11:45 to the strains of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March, played by Miss Sylvester, the wedding party descending the stairway, little Marion, sister of the bride, as flower girl, leading the way. She was followed by Mr. E. J. Marquardt, groomsman, accompanied by the groom, who took their places in the parlor beneath a beautiful arch formed of white silk streamers, similax and carnations, dainty little cupids swinging from the center. Gorgeous palms in the rear forming a splendid background; where the beautiful and impressive ceremony should take place, there awaiting the bride. Miss Katherine, sister of the bride, as bridesmaid, led the way for the bride, who was escorted by her father down the stairway and to the parlor where he presented her to her helpmate through life. Here they were joined in the holy bonds of matrimony by the Rev. Frank Doran of the Central Methodist Church of Winona, using the beautiful ring ceremony.
The bride was attired in white silk batiste, brimmed with valencinnes and real lace, and carried a shower bouquet of bridal roses. Her going away gown being of shepherds plaid.
After the wedding ceremony was over, the happy couple were showered with many congratulations from the relatives and friends. A bountiful luncheon, consisting of six courses, was next served where many happy countenances were present adding

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their words of congratulations and still wishing the happy couple a lifetime of happiness and success. Beside each cover was laid a neat hand painted menu card. On the cover a carnation over which was the monogram "B-S" in gold. The menu was as follows: bouillon, canapes, fruit salad, frappe, olives, bouchers, radishes, salmon croquelles, French potatoes, creamed asparagus, French desert, small kaees, almonds, coffee noir.
On each side of the card were a toast to the bride and groom.
The dining room was elaborately decorated with a festoon of white, ornamented with white doves and streamers reaching to all sides of the room, a profusion of similax and carnations also being used. The whole of the spacious home was neatly decorated with palms, similax, carnations, etc. making it very attractive as well as impressive.
The wedding presents were many, very beautiful, and valuable. Some were of especial beauty and all were of a useful nature which will help to make the new home more happy and comfortable. All will be gems to assist in remembering the happiest event in their lives.
The bride is the eldest daughter of our banker, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, and an accomplished young lady. She has grown to womanhood here, having graduated from the high school and since has attended the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. The groom is a graduate of the Oberlin Business College, and was a student at Oberlin College where he first met his bride.
Mr. and Mrs. Baker left on the 1:30 afternoon train for their new home at Missoula, Montana, there the groom is engaged in business.
The out of town guests were as follows: Mrs. Alice Baker, mother of the groom, Cordoria, Ill., Charles Lawrence Baker, brother of the groom, Chicago, Ill., John M. Hamilton, Waterloo, Ia., E. J. Marquardt, Toledo, Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes, St. Paul.
Mrs. P. D. Sylvester left Wednesday morning for Warner Canada where she will spend the summer with her husband. She was accompanied as far as Dodge Center by her sister, Miss Avis.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Winona Monday evening.
On Saturday E. L. Sylvester received his new Glide Auto and as the roads again get into condition will join the pleasure seekers.

April 29, 1910- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son, who have been spending a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, returned to St. Paul Saturday morning.

May 6, 1910- Auto Club election. Pres.- G. H. Dickman, VP- J. J. Erding, Sec/Treas- G. F. Sylvester, Director- Dr. E. E. Smith.

May 13, 1910- G. F. Sylvester and family and W. J. Trautman were Sunday visitors to Minneiska, making the trip in the former’s auto.

May 27, 1910- Annual Travelers meeting- Enrollment for year 35, Ave. attendance 17, number of visitors at the regular meeting 16.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was appointed as delegate and attended the convention of the State Federation in Lake City September 24.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Monday morning for Albert Lea where the former went to attend the bankers convention.

June 3, 1910- A party of 18 composed of… G. F. Sylvester…, enjoyed an auto ride to Winona Tuesday evening where they attended Masonic Lodge and witnessed work in the 3rd degree and the new Temple. The work was fine and the hospitality of the Winona Brethren was highly appreciated. The trip down and back proved a delightful one and every machine made the trip without mishap. (NOTE: The Masonic Temple building is still in existence in Winona, the lower floor being used as a Senior Citizen Center.)

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E. L. Sylvester and family drove their auto to Minneapolis Sunday returning Monday.

June 10, 1910- Neither absent or tardy past school year- Edwin Sylvester grade 4.
Miss Nettie Sylvester left for St. Paul Monday morning on a visit to relatives.

June 17, 1910- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained the members of the Mandolin Club and their husbands on Monday evening.

July 1, 1910- E. L. Sylvester and family, who have been spending a few days at the Cities returned home Tuesday evening.
The Priscillas have the agency for the "Howard Dustless" dust clothes and broom bags, 25 and 35 cents each. Persons wishing these articles speak to Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

July 8, 1910- Bids to erect new city hall.

July 15, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester departed Monday evening for Chicago where she goes to attend a musical at the Northwestern Conservatory of Music. She expects to be absent about a month.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained her Sunday school class with an automobile ride to Rochester last Friday. A picnic dinner was served in Central Park at that place and a most pleasant time was enjoyed by all.

July 22, 1910- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and children left Monday morning for Oak Park on a visit to her mother.

July 29, 1910- School Board Organized. G. H. Dickman- President, G. F. Sylvester- clerk, P. C. Wood- treasurer.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughters Katherine and Marion, returned Saturday from a short visit to the home of her mother at Oak Park.

August 5, 1910- E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl returned last week from an extended auto trip during which they took part in the Dispatch Endurance Test. They have enjoyed a delightful trip and experienced but little trouble outside the breaking of a spring in the first lap run, finishing with their machine in fine shape.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been spending several weeks at Chicago and Evanston, Ill. returned home Saturday.
G. F. Sylvester and family left Monday for Spokane, Washington on a visit to their daughter, Mrs. Baker. While in the West they will also visit several points of interest.
The Ladies Aid of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.
Mrs. Roy Holmes and little son of St. Paul are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

August 12, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester entertained a company of young lady friends at her home on Broadway Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Ira Fisk.

August 19, 1910- E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, and A. J. Fricke of Plainview spend Tuesday on the river here with Fred Moys and Claudia LaChappels as guides. They had good luck, Byrl landing the largest black bass caught here this season. It tipped the scale at 5 pounds and was secured with considerable difficulty, breaking the pole and making a game struggle. –Wabasha Herald.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son, who have been spending some time at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, left for her home at St. Paul Wednesday morning. She was accompanied as far as Rochester by her mother.

September 2, 1910- Return from Western Trip. G. F. Sylvester and family who have been spending the past month in the West on a visit to their daughter and other relatives and friends, returned home Saturday. They have enjoyed a most delightful outing and have thoroughly enjoyed their vacation.

September 9, 1910- Mr. and Mrs. Park Sylvester and little daughter who have been spending the summer at Warner, Canada, returned home Friday.

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E. L. Sylvester and family, who have been spending a few days in the Cities, visiting relatives and attending the Conservation Congress, returned home Wednesday evening, making the trip by auto.
The Plainview Bank has recently brightened up their institution by having the interior and all fixtures repolished and varnished. The job has been a tedious one to complete, but the proprietors are well repaid by the splendid appearance of their institution. The interior woodwork now looks as if new.

September 25, 1910, Sunday- We took a long walk with the crowd. Dr. and Mrs. Slocumb, Mack’s, LaCraft’s, Woodcock’s, and G. F. Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

September 30, 1910- The Pricillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday.
Wednesday afternoon the 5th, 6th, and 7th grades enjoyed interesting talks by G. F. Sylvester on his trip to the Pacific Coast. He secured some very pretty sea shells and other things which he kindly left at the school house so that all who wished may examine them.

October 2, 1910, Sunday- In the afternoon G. F. Sylvester’s, Woodcock’s, and us went to Wabasha. –Dickman Diary.

October 7, 1910- Fair results. Plates painting Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first, Hot pan holder- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first, Candlestick- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first.
E. L. Sylvester and family took an auto ride to the river Sunday.
J. J. Erding, G. H. Dickman and G. F. Sylvester and their families autos to Wabasha Sunday where they spent the day with friends.

October 9, 1910, Sunday- We went to Winona. Also A. Zabel and family, Geo. Reiter, Edwin Sylvester and family, Miss Buswell, G. F. Sylvester and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy, J. H. Eggers and Elsie Burnham, Kate Leonard, H. Walch and family. We went to church there in the forenoon. We got back at 7 o’clock. –Dickman Diary.

October 14, 1910- Park Sylvester has purchased the Phillips Conner 20 acre truck farm just north of the village. He has also rented the residence of J. Jacobs place, formerly known as the Reiter farm.
The following party of autoists composed of 26 Plainviewites drove to Winona Sunday morning, where they attended church and spent the day in the city… G. F. Sylvester and family, E. L. Sylvester and family… They had a most delightful day for the trip and as the roads were fine the trip proved a very pleasant one.

October 21, 1910- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon.

October 28, 1910- E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester Monday.

November 4, 1910- Byrl Sylvester was pleasantly surprised Friday evening by a number of his friends the occasion being his birthday.

November 11, 1910- The question of Woman Suffrage was discussed by the classics class Friday afternoon. Equally good points were brought up by both sides. School News.
E. L. Sylvester and Curtis Slawson left Monday morning for the northern part of the state to enjoy a few days hunting for big game.

November 18, 1910- A. C. Woodcock, E. A. Carpenter, and Byrl Sylvester were among those from Plainview who attended the Minnesota-Wisconsin football game.

November 25, 1910- Travelers Club – November 28 – Mrs. Venables. "The Northmen" Miss Sylvester. Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Mrs. Slocumb were visitors Wednesday afternoon. School News. (NOTE: visiting Thanksgiving play?)
E. L. Sylvester and Curtis Slawson returned from the northern part of the state Wednesday night where they have been hunting big game for several days. We understand they secured two very fine deer. Owing to a wreck they were compelled to return by way of Millville and did not arrive until late in the nights.

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December 2, 1910- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner Saturday evening.

December 9, 1910- Travelers Club – December 12 – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
"Rotterdam"- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Music in charge of by Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

December 23, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester who is taking special work in music and art at Northwestern college, Evanston, Ill. leaves for her home in Minnesota for the holiday vacation Friday. Miss Sylvester is a graduate of Hamline University and an artist in music. Chicago-Record Herald.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Princeton, Ill, arrived Saturday morning on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained the members of her Sunday School class Saturday afternoon. One of the enjoyable features was a Christmas tree, presents being contributed by the teachers and members of the class after enjoying a pleasant afternoon a fine supper was served.

December 30, 1910- Miss Nettie Sylvester of Chicago and Mrs. R. J. Holmes of St. Paul are spending the holidays at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been spending a few days at home, returned to Evanston, Ill. Thursday.

December 31, 1910, Saturday- We all went to E. L. Sylvester’s to see in the new year. –Dickman Diary.

=== [ 1911 ] ===

January 6, 1911- Mrs. R. J. Holmes returned to St. Paul on Friday. She was accompanied as far as Rochester by her mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and sister Nettie.
Miss Nettie Sylvester returned to Chicago Monday afternoon.
A company of friends met at the home of E. L. Sylvester on New Years Eve to watch the old year out and the new year in. At exactly 12 o’clock the merry making began in good earnest. Games and a musical were the order of the evening and early morning.
Sunday school at M. E. Church. E. L. Sylvester, Supt.

January 13, 1911- G. F. Sylvester went to St. Paul Wednesday morning to attend the meeting of the State Agricultural Society.
The Plainview State Bank has added another $1,000 to their surplus fund, making a total of $8,000. Our banking institutions continue to progress.

January 20, 1911- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughters Katherine and Marion, left Wednesday morning for the Cities on a few days visit.

January 25, 1911, Wednesday- Company for the evening were G. F. Sylvester and family, Ed. Sylvester and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy, Mr. and Mrs. Woodcock. –Dickman Diary.

February 5, 1911, Sunday- In the afternoon Edwin and Franklin Sylvester and myself went walking. –Dickman Diary.

February 9, 1911, Thursday- The M&M Club was invited to La Craft’s for dinner and G. F. Sylvester’s for supper. –Dickman Diary.

February 10, 1911- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester pleasantly entertained the Travelers and Mandolin Club at a Thimble Bee Saturday afternoon.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a large company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner last Friday evening.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a large company of lady friends at a Thimble Bee yesterday afternoon.
On the evening train Alvin and Byrl Sylvester went to Elgin. –Dickman Diary.


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February 12, 1911, Sunday- In the afternoon we took a walk. Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Ed Sylvester’s and Troutman’s went along. We had a picnic supper at E. Sylvester’s. Elmer Foster, Miss Carhart, Byrl Sylvester was at our house for supper and spent the evening. –Dickman Diary.

February 17, 1911- E. L. Sylvester elected secretary of Old Settlers.

February 19, 1911, Sunday- In the afternoon Sylvester’s and us took a four mile walk. –Dickman Diary.

February 24, 1911- E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, left Thursday for St. Paul on a short visit and while there will attend the auto show.
Travelers Club- February 27, Mrs. M. M. Dickman.
"Holland in the 17th and 18th Century." Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

March 3, 1911- Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Princeton, Ill. arrived Wednesday on a visit to her parents Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

March 10, 1911- Dutch Party at G. F. Sylvesters’ Travelers Club article.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Tuesday.
The boys of the high school organized a baseball team Wednesday night. Byrl Sylvester was elected manager and Alvin Dickman captain. There seems to be good material this year and with a little effort we ought to put forth a winning team.

March 24, 1911- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul on Saturday on a visit to her parents.

March 31, 1911- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Wednesday evening for St. Paul on a short visit.
Miss Nettie Sylvester came home from Evanston, Ill. Wednesday on a short visit to her parents.
E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl drove their auto to St. Paul last Friday returning home Sunday. After making half the return trip they found travel very difficult owing to the rain. They arrived at Rochester very late and after a short stop started for home getting as far as Elgin, where owing to darkness and rain they were compelled to give it up and remain for the night, returning Monday morning by train.

April 7, 1911- Woodmen Convention held Wednesday in Plainview. Delegate present- G. F. Sylvester.
Travelers Club, Mrs. Washburn, April 10.
"Round table on Chapter V"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned from St. Paul on Thursday. She was met in Rochester by her daughter, Miss Nettie.
Miss Nettie Sylvester who is studying music at Northwestern University has been elected Musical Instructor on the faculty of the Marquette Normal School and Marquette, Michigan. –Chicago Record Herald.

April 14, 1911- G. A. Stoltz has accepted a position in the Plainview State Bank and commenced his new duties Monday.
Mrs. S. J. Lillie departed Tuesday morning for Warner Canada to spend the summer with her husband. She was accompanied to Minneapolis by her daughter, Mrs. Park Sylvester.

April 21, 1911- Travelers Club April 24, Mrs. Austin.
Instrumental Duet- Mesdames Sylvester and Trautman.
Music- Mandolin Club.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son of St. Paul came Saturday on a visit to her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Katherine, went to Mason City, Iowa Friday on a short visit, returning Monday night.

April 28, 1911- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son, who have been spending a week at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, returned to her home at St. Paul

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Friday.
G. F. Sylvester and family enjoyed an auto ride to Lake City Sunday afternoon. Mesdames F. D. Washburn and G. F. Sylvester went to Dodge Center Thursday morning to attend a meeting of the Women’s Federation Club.

May 5, 1911- Travelers Club- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, May 8.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker arrived from Waterloo, Iowa Saturday on a two weeks visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
G. F. Sylvester left Tuesday afternoon for Faribault to attend the State Woodsman Convention as a delegate from Wabasha County.
E. L. Sylvester and family and Miss Lillie Grove went to Winona Saturday afternoon to remain over Sunday and Monday the guest of friends. While there their little son, Edwin, was taken down with the measles.
E. L. Sylvester has just completed a fine large two story porch on the west side of his residence, the same being entirely screened. The lower floor is to be used as an outdoor dining room, while the upper floor will be used as slumber rooms.
Byrl Sylvester visited in Winona Saturday and Sunday.

May 12, 1911- Perfect spelling for April- Third Grade- Marion Sylvester.

May 19, 1911- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday.

May 26, 1911- G. F. Sylvester went to Winona Wednesday with his auto, being accompanied by Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, G. R. Hall, J. R. Jeffrey, and E. L. Sylvester who attended the Missionary Convention.

June 9, 1911- Mesdames E. L. and G. F. Sylvester spend Wednesday in Rochester.

June 16, 1911- Mr. and Mrs. Roy J. Holmes of St. Paul, arrived last week on a visit to her parents, MR. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

June 23, 1911- Mrs. J. H. O’Connell accompanied G. F Sylvester and family as far as St. Paul, where she will spend a few days at the home of her son, Bert.
G. F. Sylvester and family left Sunday noon with their auto for Oak Park, where his family will spend a few days at the home of her mother, while Mr. Sylvester will go from there to Bemidji to attend the State Bankers Convention.
Miss Nettie Sylvester is spending a short vacation at home.

July 7, 1911- G. F. Sylvester and family drove to West Newton Sunday where they will spend the day.
The annual school meeting will be held on Saturday evening, July 15. Two members on the board are to be elected. The term of G. F. Sylvester and P. C. Wood expired. Mr. Wood declines to serve longer as much of his time is spent away.

July 14, 1911- E. L. Sylvester and J. J. Butts made a business trip to Minneapolis Tuesday afternoon.

July 16, 1911, Sunday- We went to Lake City. Mike and Kate went along and Leona went with Frank Sylvester’s. We got home at 8:30. –Dickman Diary. (NOTE: they went to the Chautauqua.)

July 21, 1911- Death of Mrs. R. W. Chapman- daughters Mrs. I. N. Morrell of Minneapolis and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes came down from St. Paul Monday to be present at the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Chapman returning home Wednesday.
G. F. Sylvester and G. H. Dickman accompanied by their families drove to Lake City Sunday where they attended the Chautauqua. They were highly pleased with the program, especially the address by Thomas Brooks Fletcher.

July 28, 1911- Auto Club Tour…
Mrs. G. N. Morrell of Minneapolis departed for her home Monday after spending 6 weeks attending to Mrs. R. W. Chapman, her mother, during her last illness.

August 11, 1911- Miss Nettie Sylvester returned home Tuesday night to remain some

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time with her parents.
E. L. Sylvester and family left Friday night by way of Lake City for St. Paul on a few days visit to their daughter, Mrs. Holmes.

August 18, 1911- G. F. Sylvester and family started Tuesday morning on an extended auto trip to Peoria, Ill. where they will visit their daughter, Mrs. Baker.

August 25, 1911- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son of St. Paul have been guests of her parents, MR. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester the past week.
A card from G. F. Sylvester who last week made an auto trip to Peoria, Ill. a distance of over 400 miles, reports that they had a fine trip, finding the roads good and meeting with no accident.

September 1, 1911- Second Auto tour article.
Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Sylvester left Wednesday evening for Des Moines, Iowa on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Paul Carroll. Mr. Sylvester expected to spend a week there while his wife remains sometime longer.
G. F. Sylvester and family who has been enjoying a delightful auto trip to Peoria and other points in Ill. returned home Monday.

September 8, 1911- Park Sylvester returned Tuesday from his visit to Des Moines, Iowa.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Wednesday morning for St. Paul on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes.
The Ladies Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church met with Mrs. Mallory. Election of officers, Recording Secretary- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Correspondence Secretary- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

October 13, 1911- Travelers at G. F. Sylvester, October 23.
"Chapter IV"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
"Spanish Dance", Moskowske- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

October 27, 1911- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next week.

November 3, 1911- Miss Katherine Sylvester entertained a company of 30 friends at a Halloween Party Tuesday evening. To say that the young people had a delightful time would hardly express their feelings.
E. L. Sylvester leaves today for the northern part of the state on a hunting trip. He will be accompanied as far as St. Paul by his son Byrl, who will attend the Minnesota-Wisconsin football game.

November 10, 1911- Travelers Club, November 20, Mrs. Finch.
"Chapter VII"- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Music Selected- Katherine Sylvester.
The Ladies Aid will meet next Friday with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon.

November 24, 1911- E. L. Sylvester and Curtis Slawson returned Saturday from their trip to the northern part of the state where they have been hunting big game. They have had a fine time and were very successful, bringing back two fine deer.

November 30, 1911, Thursday- In the evening we had a bowling party of 14 men and after the bowling the ladies gave a lunch at our house. 28 in all. Bowlers: Burchard, Dickman, Slocumb, Marshall, Woodcock, Carley, LaCraft, Dr. Smith, Ed. Sylvester, G. F. Sylvester, Rohweder, Wad Miller, Posz, and Manchester. –Dickman Diary.

December 8, 1911- E. L. Sylvester and William Lawton went to Wabasha Thursday to attend to business matters in the probate court.

December 14, 1911, Thursday- We had another bowling party tonight. 14 bowlers. The ladies served a lunch for us at E. L. Sylvester’s. –Dickman Diary.

December 15, 1911- Travelers, December 18- Library.
Guitar Trio- "Sebastapal"- Mrs. Sylvester, Mrs. Nunamaker, Miss Carhart.

December 22, 1911- Miss Nettie Sylvester of Marquette, Michigan returned home

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Saturday to spend the holiday vacation with her parents.
Ladies of G. A. R. Circle annual election- Treas.- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Chaplain- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

December 29, 1911- Eastern Star Lodge- W. P. –E. L. Sylvester.
Mrs. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker are guests at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester during the holidays.

December 31, 1911, Sunday- In the evening G. F. Sylvester’s, E. L. Sylvester’s, Saxe’s family and Prof. Ewling were here and stayed up to see in the new year. –Dickman Diary.

=== [ 1912 ] ===

January 2, 1912, Tuesday- Emma and I was to a supper at Geo. Hall’s. Those present Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, E. L. Sylvester’s, La Craft’s, Miss Trisler, Mrs. Humphrey, Emma and I. –Dickman Diary.

January 5, 1912- Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been enjoying a portion of the holidays at home, departed Saturday for Marquette, Michigan.
Travelers, January 8, Library.
"Isabel of Castile"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

January 12, 1912- G. F. Sylvester and T. G. Bolton went to St. Paul Wednesday morning to attend the State Agricultural meeting.
Basketball- Sylvester secured a free throw etc., B. Sylvester R. F., Score 10-17.

January 16, 1912, Tuesday- Vera and Leona waited on tables at E. L. Sylvester’s for the Travelers. –Dickman Diary.

January 19, 1912- Travelers 6 o’clock dinner- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, January 16.
Address of welcome- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Instrumental Trio- Mesdames Sylvester, Austin, Bush.
Piano Duet, "Spanish Dances," Mrs. Sylvester, Mrs. Austin.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son of St. Paul arrived Friday night on a visit to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester
Travelers- Library, January 22
Chapter XVI, "Toledo," Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

January 21, 1912, Sunday- In the evening we was all invited to G. F. Sylvester’s for supper. Sapey’s and E. L. Sylvester’s were there too. –Dickman Diary.

January 26, 1912- The Ladies Foreign Missionary Society of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Friday.

February 2, 1912- Basketball game- Byrl writeup.
Field goals- Sylvester 10.
Free throw Sylvester 1, Score 43 to 9
… Sylvester started the score with a basket and Timm followed with two more in rapid succession. Kellogg then scored two free throws and Budde was successful in landing each time, Sylvester failed at a trial. From then on the locals put their team work to fine use piling up the score at a rapid rate. Sylvester shot a basket, Timm took two, Sylvester two, Mack two, then Kellogg broke away and Budde secured the first basket of the half. Sylvester followed this with two more and the half ended after Askew threw another. Score 28 to 4.
In the second half Askew, who had been playing sub for V. Smith, was relieved, but after a few minutes play, Smith, who had been suffering from an injured knee was relieved by Erding. The locals did not attempt to run up the score from this on but non-the-less did good work. Sylvester shot a basket and missed one free throw. Kellogg secured two free throws, Timm shot a basket and Mack followed with another. A double foul netted Kellogg another score and they followed up with a field basket. Erding shot a basket, Sylvester secured his first and only free throw and then shot two more

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baskets, Timm then shot a basket. The half ending with a score of 43 to 9…
Old Settlers- E. L. Sylvester Secretary.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. Holmes, spent Wednesday in Rochester.

February 9, 1912- R. J. Holmes of St. Paul was a guest at the home of MR. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester the first of the week, returning home Monday.
Last Saturday afternoon the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was the scene of a very enjoyable social affair, where the members of the Travelers Club and Ladies Orchestra were entertained as guests. "Tis delightful to lay aside work occasionally and have a purely social gathering" and Mrs. Sylvester is ever thoughtful of our interest along this line. The time was spent in pleasant converse interspersed by selections from the orchestra after which a delicious luncheon was served. –Contributed.

February 23, 1912- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and son who have been guests at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, for a few weeks, departed for their home at St. Paul Tuesday.

March 1, 1912- Hamline Glee Club Tonight
Lovers of music should not miss the opportunity of hearing the Hamline Glee Club at the Opera House tonight… Besides these the program also includes selections by Mr. R. J. Holmes, the violinist, while Mrs. R. J. Holmes is the reader…
The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon. Each member is requested to donate material for an article for working at this meeting.

March 8, 1912- Mrs. S. J. Lillie who has been spending the winter at the home of her daughter, Mrs. P. D. Sylvester, departed Saturday accompanied by her daughter, Miss Avis, for their home at Warner, Canada.

March 15, 1912- Spring Elections- Treasurer- E. L. Sylvester.

March 22, 1912- On the occasion of her birthday, Katherine Sylvester entertained a number of her friends at a birthday party. Various games were played and a dainty luncheon served. All present vote Katherine a most hospitable hostess and wish her many happy returns of the day.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday

April 5, 1912- Miss Nettie Sylvester who has been spending a few days at home, returned to Marquette, Monday night.

April 19, 1912- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, left Monday for Oak Park, being called there by the serious illness of her mother, who is 87 years of age.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained at a birthday party Friday afternoon.

May 10, 1912- Edwin Sylvester has been absent from the 6th grade on account of illness for the first time this year.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Wabasha Monday evening by Auto, where they took the train for the Cities to spend a few days in attendance at the Eastern Star meeting and the M. E. Convention.

May 17, 1912- Plainview Auto Club Banquet- Sec. Treas- G. F. Sylvester reelected.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned from their visit to Minneapolis last Thursday evening.
There was fair attendance at the Republican primary last Friday evening. Following delegates- E. L. Sylvester, State Delegate.

May 31, 1912- G. F. Sylvester went to Ames, Iowa Monday afternoon in the interests of the agricultural department from the high school returning Wednesday.

June 14, 1912- E. L. Sylvester and family left Tuesday afternoon on an auto trip to Chicago where he will attend the Banker’s Convention next week. They drove to Spring Valley in the evening and made the start from there Wednesday morning, expecting to arrive in Chicago Saturday afternoon.

June 21, 1912- The Priscillas will meet with Mrs. Park Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.

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Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained the members of her Sunday School class at a picnic on the Whitewater Tuesday afternoon.
Park Sylvester lost one of his fine black horses the first of the week.

July 5, 1912- Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Rock Island, Ill. arrived Monday on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester and family returned last week from their auto trip to Chicago having a very pleasant and enjoyable ride.
Franklin Dickman too Jess Keefe, Alvin Dickman, and Byrl Sylvester to Wabasha Wednesday morning where they took the train for LaCrosse to spend the Fourth with friends.

July 12, 1912- G. F. Sylvester, G. H. Dickman, and Adolph Briese made an Auto trip to Wabasha Tuesday.
Mrs. Park Sylvester went to Des Moines, Iowa Wednesday on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Paul Carroll who is very ill.

July 19, 1912- Auto Club Tour to Millville.
Mrs. Park Sylvester who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Carroll at Des Moines, Iowa, returned home Sunday. She was met at Eyota by Mr. Sylvester.

July 26, 1912- Plainview Baseball Team. Sylvester- Second Base –"New recruit broke into the game very nicely, filling the recent vacancy nicely and playing a strong game throughout… Sylvester is a fast infield man and played a good game at second besides wielding the bat to good advantage."
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son of St. Paul are guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

August 9, 1912- Roy Holmes of St. Paul is visiting at the home of E. L. Sylvester.
Miss Nettie Sylvester arrived home from Marquette, Michigan Monday night to spend the summer vacation.
Dr. Caldwell of Coleraine is a guest at the home of E. L. Sylvester this week.

August 16, 1912- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and son who have been spending some time at the home of her parents, MR. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, left Monday morning for Rochester where she was joined by the Misses Stafford of Salina, Kansas and together they will visit Mrs. W. J. Dyer of Bemidji.

August 23, 1912- Auto Club Tour- Wednesday evening to Kellogg.
G. F. Sylvester and family left Monday on a cross country Auto trip to Peoria, Ill. and other points. They expect to be absent a week or more.

August 30, 1912- Thaddeus Davey and Byrl Sylvester left for West Newton Sunday afternoon to spend a few days with friends on the river.

September 6, 1912- Auto Club Visits Wabasha Today.
G. F. Sylvester and family returned Sunday from their auto trip into Ill. During their trip they met some very rough roads owing to the heavy rains.
Park Sylvester and family, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Carroll, went to West Newton Sunday to enjoy a few days outing on the river.

September 13, 1912- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday morning where she spent the day with friends.
E. L. Sylvester and son, Byrl, left for Minneapolis Monday where the latter will enter the State University.
T. G. Bolton, Miss Mary Bolton, and Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester were selected as delegates to the Sunday School Convention to be held at Mazeppa next week.

September 27, 1912- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and R. W. Chapman left Monday morning on an extended trip to Buffalo and other New York points, where they will visit relatives and the former home of Mr. Chapman.
Miss Nettie Sylvester, who has been spending sometime at her home here, returned to Marquette, Michigan, Wednesday where she will again resume her position

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as musical instructor in the schools of that city.

October 4, 1912- Together with Dr. J. A. Slocumb, E. L. Sylvester, and Ward Miller, the editor, enjoyed a visit to the Lake City Street Fair Wednesday afternoon.

October 11, 1912- Messrs and Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and B. E. Rohweder autoed to Winona Wednesday afternoon to attend the Schuman-Heinck Opera.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner Tuesday evening.

October 18, 2006- Travelers October 21 – Library.
"Duluth and Hennepin Chapter 7 Book 1"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
On learning that it was impossible for Mr. Thompson to survive by a few hours, G. F. Sylvester, M. J. Manchester, E. A. Carpenter, R. A. Askew and E. L. Sylvester started for Winona Monday afternoon but owing to a breakdown did not arrive in the city until an hour after he had expired. (NOTE: Mr. Thompson was mayor of Plainview who died of typhoid fever at Winona General Hospital).

October 25, 1912- Travelers Club, November 4, 1912-
"Fort Snelling as it is Today"- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester has been appointed special administrator of the J. F. Thompson estate and his business will be continued on as formerly for the present.
E. L. Sylvester went to Winona Friday afternoon where he met Mrs. Sylvester and R. W. Chapman on their return from an extended visit to New York state. Their train was late getting to Eyota so that they were compelled to return home by auto late in the night. Mrs. Sylvester says that she had a delightful time but finds that there is no place like home no matter where it may be.

November 1, 1912- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester accompanied by G. R. Hall and Mrs. A. S. Kennedy autoed to Rochester Tuesday where they spent the day among friends.
8th grade spelling- Katherine Sylvester, 89% October.

November 15, 1912- Mesdames Chas Bush, James Carley, and E. L. Sylvester visited in Winona Thursday.

November 29, 1912- Big game hunters J. J. Erding, E. L. Sylvester, J. D. Bateman, Curtis Slawson and Tom Hall all returned home last week, each having secured the limited number of deer. They remained several days in the hope of snow that they might secure a moose but the fine fall weather failed to change and they came home without the coveted prize. Hunting has been fine this fall and they have enjoyed a pleasant trip.

December 20, 1912- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Tuesday in Rochester.

December 27, 1912- Miss Nettie Sylvester of Marquette, Michigan arrived Tuesday afternoon to spend the holidays at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughters Katherine and Marion, left Tuesday afternoon for Moline, Ill. to spend Christmas at the home of their daughter Mrs. Baker.
Byrl Sylvester, who is taking his first years work at the State University, came home Saturday for the holidays.

=== [ 1913 ] ===

January 10, 1913- Miss Nettie Sylvester returned to Marquette, Michigan Friday.

January 17, 1913- G. A. R. Circle election- Treasurer- Mrs. Kate Sylvester.
At 6 o’clock tables were spread and a bounteous supper was served by the ladies of the circle and their families and the old soldiers and their families.
G. F. Sylvester and T. G. Bolton went to St. Paul Wednesday morning to attend the State Agricultural meeting in the interest of the Wabasha County Industrial Fair Association.

January 24, 1913- James A. Carley and E. L. Sylvester went to Wabasha Monday evening to attend to probate matters.

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Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a large company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner last Wednesday evening.

January 31, 1913- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a large company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner Tuesday evening.

February 14, 1913- E. L. Sylvester went to the Cities Tuesday on a short visit and will doubtless visit the Auto Show while there.

February 21, 1913- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and friend, Mrs. Secumb, spent Tuesday with friends in Rochester.
Rev. J. R. Jeffrey and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Elgin Tuesday afternoon where they attended the district Sunday School Institute that afternoon and evening conducted by Mrs. Jean Hobart.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned from a visit to St. Paul last Thursday. She was accompanied by her daughter Mrs. Roy Holmes and son, who will visit here for some time.

February 28, 1913- Old Settlers. E. L. Sylvester elected secretary.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to St. Paul Friday on a few days visit returning home Monday.
In the matter of Jay F. Thompson Estate. Pay your account to E. L. Sylvester, administrator.

March 7, 1913- The G. A. R. Circle will meet Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday.
R. J. Holmes came down from St. Paul Friday on a few days visit returning home Monday.
Travelers Club- City Hall, March 17.
"Pure food in its relations to public health and conservation," Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

March 21, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends Friday afternoon in honor of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little son, who have been guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester for the past few weeks, departed for their home in St. Paul Saturday.
The Travelers Club held their annual election on Monday evening and elected the following officers: Mrs. G. F. Sylvester- President, Mrs. J. T. Fiske- VP, Miss Kate Biers- Secretary, Miss Mary Lahey- treasurer.

March 28, 1913- Engagement is announced- Miss Nettie Sylvester and Dr. J. P. Caldwell.
E. L. Sylvester, G. A. Stoltz, and James A. Carley were business callers in Elgin Monday afternoon.
Charles A. Swanson who is attending the Winona Business College and Byrl Sylvester, and Thomas Askew who are U. Students spent their Easter vacation in Plainview and renewed their acquaintances with their Alma Mater. All three are members of the class of 1912.

April 4, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for St. Paul Wednesday morning where she will meet her daughter, Miss Nettie, who is returning home from Marquette, Michigan.

April 25, 1913- G. F. Sylvester went to Ames, Iowa last week for the purpose of securing an instructor for the agricultural department of our High School and was fortunate in security H. F. Boyts, one of this years graduates.
E. L. Sylvester and G. A. Stoltz spent Monday afternoon in Elgin attending to business matters.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who has been spending a few days at St. Paul, returned home Saturday. She was accompanied by her daughter, Miss Nettie of Marquette, Michigan.
E. L. Sylvester was called to St. Paul Tuesday night by the serious illness of his daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes, who was suffering from a severe case of appendicitis. For

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a time her condition was very critical. On Wednesday she underwent an operation at St. Luke Hospital which proved successful and she is now improving nicely.

May 2, 1913- Many homes will be built… E. L. Sylvester plans to erect a residence on W. Broadway. (NOTE: It never happens.)
Mesdames H. C. Todd and G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday to attend the convention of the Women’s Federation of Clubs as representatives of the Travelers.

May 9, 1913- On Friday afternoon May 2, Mesdames J. F. Bolton and J. A. LaCraft entertained a company of 36 ladies in honor of Miss Nettie Sylvester, a bride of the month, at the home of the latter.
The home was beautifully decorated with plum blossoms and ferns. During the afternoon Miss Sylvester delighted the company with several beautiful vocal selections after which dainty refreshments were served in three courses. The favors were pink carnations. The last course served to the bride elect consisting of many handsome gifts, presented by friends who all join in wishing for her happiness.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter went to Eyota Wednesday morning to meet her daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. who will visit her parents for a time.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Mrs. Baker, left Thursday morning for St. Paul on a few days visit.

May 16, 1913-
A Beautiful Home Wedding
Miss Nettie Sylvester and Dr. James Caldwell at Home of Parents
Wednesday Evening
Leave for Trip in the East
Will Make Home at Coleraine Where the Groom Has Lucrative Practice
The marriage of Miss Nettie Hazel Sylvester of this city and Dr. James Phaon Caldwell Jr. of Coleraine, occurred Wednesday evening May 14, at 6:30 at the home of the bride’s parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
The spacious Sylvester home was handsomely decorated for the occasion. A profusion of flowers consisting of pink and white roses adorned the living room, carnations and sweet peas in the parlor and dining room, lending brightness and radiance to the occasion. The ceremony took place beneath a floral arch of similax and pink carnations. The bride was attended by Miss Flora Retallic of Marquette, Michigan, as bridesmaid, and Mrs. R. J. Holmes of St. Paul as matron of honor. Mr. Kenneth S. Caldwell of St. Paul, brother of the bride, acted as best man. Mr. E. L. Sylvester, father of the bride, gave the bride away.
Promptly at 6:30 Mrs. Paul Carrol of Des Moines, sand "Your Voice" by Penza followed by Lohengrin’s March played by Mrs. B. C. Ferris of St. Paul. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. R. Jeffery at the close of which Mendelssohn’s Wedding March was played accompanied by R. J. Holmes on the violin.
Following the ceremony a reception was given to Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and a six course dinner was served.
The bride was attired in white embroidered net of Parisian design over satin charmeuse and carried a large bouquet of white bridal roses and lilies of the valley. Miss Flora Retallic wore white sating draped in shadow lace and carried Killarney roses. Mrs. R. J. Holmes wore white voile over blue messaline and carried sweet peas and lilies of the valley.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell is a graduate of Hamline University and of the Northwestern Conservatory of Music and Art and is the possessor of a beautiful soprano voice and an accomplished pianist. For the past two years she has been superintendent of music at the Northern Normal School at Marquette, Michigan, and has a host of admirers in northern Michigan and southern Minnesota through her exceptional ability, charming and wining personality.
Dr. James P. Caldwell Jr. is a graduate of Hamline University and the University

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of Minnesota Medical department and also of the Northwestern Hospital of Minneapolis. Dr. Caldwell has been practicing his profession at Coleraine for the past three years and will have charge of the hospital at Marble for the Hill Mines now being operated by the U. S. Steel Corporation.
Dr. and Mrs. Caldwell left directly after the ceremony for the East and will be at home at Coleraine, Minnesota after July 1, 1913.
The out of town guests who were present at the wedding were: Mrs. Paul Carroll of Des Moines, Ia., Mrs. R. J. Baker of Moline Ill., Miss Flora Retallic of Marquette, Michigan, Mill Ella Bason of Escanaba, Michigan, Mrs. B. C. Ferris of 1446 N. Minnehaha, St. Paul, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of St. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes of St. Paul, Mr. Kenneth Caldwell of St. Paul and Mrs. C. I. Humphrey of St. Paul.
Among those who were in attendance at the Sylvester Caldwell wedding who departed Thursday noon were Byrl Sylvester and Kenneth Caldwell for St. Paul, Miss Flora Retallic for Marquette, Michigan, and Miss Ella Bason for Escanaba, Michigan.
Miss Nettie Sylvester went to Eyota Saturday afternoon where she met her sister, Mrs. R. J. Holmes and son of St. Paul, who will spend a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Thomas Askew and Byrl Sylvester came down from Minneapolis Friday night the former remained over Sunday while the latter spent the greater part of the week here.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester will give a paper on "Special Work" at the Winona District Women’s Foreign Missions Society held at Rochester May 22 & 23.

May 23, 1913- Park Sylvester loaded a car of effects and on Wednesday evening left for St. Charles where the car will be complete with stock and farm machinery and then shipped to Warner, Canada where he will join his family and make his future home.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker, who has been spending several days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester departed for her home at Moline, Ill. last Thursday. She was accompanied to Winona by her mother.
G. F. Sylvester and S. S. Lyons went to Rochester Monday to attend to Woodmen Convention to be held in that city.

May 30, 1913- Mrs. R. J. Holmes who has been spending the past few weeks at the home of her parents, departed for her home at St. Paul Monday afternoon. She was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who will go from there to Coleraine to spend a few days with her daughter, Mrs. Caldwell.

June 13, 1913- Byrl Sylvester and Tom Askew who have been attending the State University returned home last week for the summer vacation.
Byrl Sylvester, who has been enjoying several days at home, returned to Minneapolis Sunday evening to resume work at the University.

June 27, 1913- G. F. Sylvester drove to Kellogg Tuesday where Mrs. Sylvester and daughters Katherine and Marion took the train for St. Paul to spend a few days with friends.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Rev. J. R. Jeffrey and Mrs. Buss autoed to Lake City Thursday to attend the Chautauqua and will remain until Saturday.

July 11, 1913- Structure at E. L. Sylvester place gutted by fire early Sunday night. $750 damage, insurance $350. 2 autos removed. (NOTE: it was a garage.)
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Wabasha Monday.

July 18, 1913- G. F. Sylvester and family autoed to Winona Monday where Miss Katherine took the train for Rock Island, Ill. on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Baker.

July 25, 1913- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, went to Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day.

August 1, 1913- Byrl Sylvester, who has been attending school at the Cities for the past two months, returned home Friday evening to remain until the fall term opens in September.

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August 8, 1913- E. L. Sylvester and sons Byrl and Edwin accompanied by Curtis Slawson, and daughter Miss Veda, went to Camp Schmoker Tuesday afternoon on a fishing trip.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, left Monday morning on an extended auto trip to Moline, Ill. where they will visit their daughter, Mrs. Baker and then spend a few weeks in the East.

August 15, 1913- A Fortunate Auto Accident
Axel Breaks on Sylvester Carl While Returning from Kellogg Saturday
An auto accident that proved the luckiest of anything we have heard of this season happened on the Kellogg road, about 10 miles north of here Saturday evening about 7 o’clock, when the axel on the left front wheel of E. L. Sylvester’s car broke and threw the car with its load to the side of the road.
Byrl Sylvester, accompanied by Curt Timm, drove to the river road to meet his mother, who had been visiting the Cities, and were on the return trip. Near the Lydon farm where they were running up a light grade at a moderate speed, the wheel snapped off, throwing the big car to the side of the road. At this point there is quite an embankment on the side of the road and the skidding car landed against this, sliding along of nearly two rods, tearing the fender off and preventing the car from turning turtle. When the machine stopped it looked as though it had been ran there intentionally to support if from going over. Owing to the sudden impact of the car tearing into the bank, Mrs. Sylvester, who occupied the back seat alone, was thrown into the air. As she came down, she landed in the hood, just missing by a hair breath of being precipitated to the hard road. The accident happened so sudden that none of the occupants had time to become frightened, but after it was over there was a pretty scared bunch. Had it occurred at any other point in the road, we fear there would have been a sad story to relate, for only the embankment prevented the car from turning completely over.
The party went to a farm house and telephoned for another car to come after them and were soon safe at home.
Byrl Sylvester left Monday to join a party of fraternity brothers on a two weeks outing at Edgewater, Wisconsin.

August 29, 1913- G. F. Sylvester and family returned Saturday from an extended auto trip to Moline, Ill. where they visited at the home of their daughter. On their return they came through Iowa and visited at the home of William Simms.

September 5, 1913- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and son came down from St. Paul Tuesday afternoon on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Miss Esther Trip of Merian Park arrived Monday evening on a visit to Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family.
(NOTE: These weeks have several baseball game scores of which Byrl Sylvester is on the team.)

September 19, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who accompanied her son to St. Paul Sunday, returned home Tuesday night.
Byrl Sylvester left Monday for Minneapolis where he will again take up his studies at the State University.

October 3, 1913- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Mankato Saturday and remained over Sunday in attendance at the M. E. Conference.

October 10, 1913- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester received a telegram Wednesday evening informing them that their daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell was seriously ill. Mrs. Sylvester left immediately for Wabasha where she took the early morning train for the home of her daughter at Marble.

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October 17, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who was called to the home of her daughter at Marble last week returned home Thursday. She reports Mrs. Caldwell has greatly improved.
The Pricillas held a farewell reception for Mrs. J. R. Jeffrey on Monday afternoon at the Home of Mrs. M. T. Bolton. (NOTE: New home in Tracy.).
Rev. Hitchcock and family arrived from Madelia last week and are now located in the M. E. parsonage.

October 24, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin went to Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day. (NOTE: No school because of educational meetings in the Cities).

October 31, 1913- Byrl Sylvester came down from Minneapolis Saturday and spent Sunday with his parents.
The first Literary program of the season will be given by the Minerva Society Wednesday evening November 5. It will be as follows… Violin Solo- Katherine Sylvester. The entertainment will commence at 7:30.

November 7, 1913- E. L. Sylvester and Dr. J. A. Slocumb left Tuesday afternoon for the Cities and from there will go to Big Fork to prepare for the annual hunt for big game.
Travelers Club- November 17- Mrs. J. A. Slocumb.
"Life and Works of J. Fennimore Cooper"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

November 21, 1913- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin went to Minneapolis Friday morning on a visit to her son Byrl and to attend the Minnesota – Chicago Football game.

November 28, 1913- E. L. Sylvester, J. D. Bateman, and Curtis Slawson returned last Friday from the northern part of the state where they have spent the past few weeks hunting big game. They have had a very pleasant time and brought back three fine deer and a quantity of small game.

December 5, 1913- Travelers Club, December 15- Mrs. E. G. Mack.
… Piano Solo- "Charge of the Uhlan," Bohn- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

December 19, 1913- G. F. Sylvester went to Chatfield Friday where he acted as one of the judges in the St. Charles – Chatfield high school debate.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Thursday morning for the Cities on a short visit.

December 26, 1913- Byrl Sylvester who is attending the Minnesota University came home Saturday to spend the holiday vacation.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. arrived last Thursday to remain the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester during the holidays.
The band concert on the street Tuesday afternoon delighted the many Christmas shoppers. It is not often that it is mild enough at this time of year in Minnesota to enjoy an open air band concert.

=== [ 1914 ] ===

January 2, 1914- Byrl Sylvester entertained a stag party on Christmas night at his home on West Broadway. The evening was spent playing 500. At midnight refreshments were served and in the morning all returned home.
E. L. Sylvester left Thursday morning for Winnipeg and points in Canada on a business trip.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker, who have been spending a portion of the holidays at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, departed for their home at Moline, Ill. Saturday.

January 16, 1914- S. J. Lillie of Warner, Canada, enjoyed a visit by E. L. Sylvester last week and assures all that they are always glad to see anyone from Plainview.
E. L. Sylvester returned Tuesday from an extended trip through Canada. He

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Visited with a number of former Plainview people at various points and greatly enjoyed the trip but he was not pleased with the country.

February 6, 1914- Travelers- Feb. 7, Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Roll Call- Darkie Quotations
E. L. Sylvester and James H. Carley made a business trip to Winona Monday.
Last week E. L. Sylvester purchased the Butts 160 acre farm west of the village.

February 20, 1914- Old Settlers- Flute Solo- J. A. Conaway & G. F. Sylvester- Accompanied by Mrs. Conaway.

February 27, 1914- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Katherine, went to St. Paul last Thursday where the former attended the annual meeting of the Federation of Women Clubs as a delegate. They returned by way of Winona and attended the Eastern Star meeting in that city Monday evening.
G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, went to Winona Monday afternoon where the former attended the Eastern Star meeting in that city.
The W. F. M. S. of the M. E. Church will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Friday afternoon of next week. The ladies are invited to come and learn how to write Chinese.

March 13, 1914- Annual Gathering of Travelers at Opera House.
E. L. Sylvester disposed of his 160 acre farm recently purchased of J. J. Butts to Mrs. Peter Weise of Rollingstone last week. She expects to take possession of same this spring.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Simms of Beeman, Iowa arrived Saturday on a visit to friends, remaining until Monday evening. While in the city they were guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and were delighted to greet Mr. and Mrs. Simms, particularly the pupils of our H. S. and they voiced their pleasure with hearty cheers when they visited the school.

March 20, 1914- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Wednesday evening from a few weeks visit to the homes of her daughters.

April 3, 1914- G. F. Sylvester, J. J. Eggers, A. R. Klavetter, and Andrew Hunter attended Woodman county convention at Millville Wednesday.

April 10, 1914- James A. Carley, E. L. Sylvester, and Dr. E. E. Smith left for Winona Thursday morning to attend the Maundy – Thursday banquet at the Masonic Temple.

April 17, 1914- E. L. Sylvester and James A. Carley went to Wabasha and the Cities Tuesday on a business trip.

April 24, 1914- Mr. G. F. Sylvester went to Owatonna Tuesday morning to attend the district meeting of the Women’s Federation of Clubs as a delegate. We understand that an effort will be made to hold the next meeting at Plainview.
E. L. Sylvester last week secured a new Overland Runabout to enjoy the seasons pleasure.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Monday to spend the day.

May 1, 1914- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter spent Monday in Rochester.

May 15, 1914- E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester on Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin, motored to Winona Saturday returning Sunday evening.
E. L. Sylvester met his sister, Mrs. W. P. Dyer in Wabasha on Thursday. She will visit with old friends while here.

May 22, 1914- E. L. Sylvester went to Wabasha Friday morning where he met his sister, Mrs. Dyer of Bemidji, who will spend some time visiting relatives and friends here.
Election of Travelers Club- Officers elected: Pres.- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, V. P.- Miss Nettie Harrington, Sec.- Mrs. H. G. Austin, Treasurer- Miss Clara Phillips.

May 29, 1914- E. L. Sylvester and A. S. Kennedy went to Lake City Tuesday where they attended the district Bankers Convention held at this place.

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June 6, 1914- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of Marble, arrived last week on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son to be present at the annual commencement exercise of the Plainview High School.

June 12, 1914- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Wabasha Monday morning where she joined the delegates in their special train from the Cities to Chicago where they will attend the biannual convention of the Women’s Federation of Clubs. She will be joined in Chicago by her daughter, Mrs. Baker.
Byrl Sylvester is expected home today for the summer vacation.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, departed for her home at Marble Tuesday.

June 26, 1914- Byrl Sylvester arrived home last Friday evening to spend the summer.
Miss Katherine Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday morning to spend the day.

July 3, 1914- Byrl Sylvester went to Pine Island Sunday for a brief visit with Franklin Dickman.

July 17, 1914- Chautauqua ends on Thursday.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. is the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
On Thursday afternoon July 9, J. J. Erding was surprised by a company of deer slayers. The event being his birthday a 6 o’clock dinner was served which while enjoying a smoke, many hunting trips were talked over and a few fish stories were told. Those present were Aug. Polson, Jim Nolan of Millville, E. L. Sylvester, Dr. J. A. Solcumb, and C S. Slawson…
Messrs. J. J. Erding and E. L. Sylvester made another nice catch of bass at the river one day last week.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester are entertaining Mrs. E. J. Buss and son Wallace, from Princeton, Minnesota during Chautauqua.

July 24, 1914- Byrl and Edwin Sylvester left Sunday for Duluth and Coleraine to visit their sisters.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Monday noon for an auto trip through the Dakotas for two weeks.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker, who has been the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester for a few weeks, departed Saturday for her home at Moline, Ill. stopping off at Winona for a short visit.
Elected at annual school meeting- 48 votes cast: Dr. J. A. Slocumb, Dr. T. J. Moore for a 3 year term, G. F. Sylvester 1 year term.

July 31, 1914- The following are the winners of the late garden contest. Edwin Briese first, Edwin Sylvester second, Ray Foster third, Arnold Eggers fourth, Donald Duerre fifth.

August 7, 1914- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester who have been enjoying an extended auto trip through the western part of the state and South Dakota returned home Saturday night. They have had a very delightful trip regardless of the fact that they struck several rain storms.

August 14, 1914- Should you not receive the county fair premium book by mail, call on or write to the secretary, G. F. Sylvester and he will supply you.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul last week where she met her son, Edwin, who has been visiting his sisters at Duluth and Marble.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family departed Monday on an auto tour to Lake Park, Milaca, St. Cloud, and other points.
Messrs. and Mesdames Ralph Blakely and D. Hamilton autoed over from Rochester Sunday and were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester while in the city.
E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Winona and Wabasha Saturday.

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August 21, 1914- Mr. and Mrs. Park Sylvester and daughter arrived last week from Warner, Canada to make their home again in Plainview.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday where the former went to consult doctors. Mrs. Sylvester returned in the evening.

September 4, 1914- G. F. Sylvester who is taking treatment at Waukesha, Wisconsin writes that he is feeling fine and improving nicely.

September 11, 1914- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for Waukesha, Wisconsin Monday morning to spend a few days with her husband. They expect to return about the 18th of the month.

September 18, 1914- Byrl Sylvester left Tuesday morning for Minneapolis where he will again enter the State University. He plans to take a course in law.

September 25, 1914- G. F. Sylvester who has been spending the past few weeks at Waukesha, Wisconsin for the benefit of his health, returned home Friday. He is greatly improved and is now feeling fine.
The Travelers will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Monday evening. All interested in the work are invited to be present.

October 9, 1914- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Friday in Rochester.

October 23, 1914- Fair results- Flowers- Hanging baskets- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester second. Palms- Ms. G. F. Sylvester first. Bed Spread crocheted- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester second. Curtains crocheted lace- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester enjoyed a pleasant auto trip to the Cities last week, returning home Monday.

October 30, 1914- More Fair results- Collection of 6 cups and saucers- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester second. Painting scene from nature- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of Marble arrived Thursday on a visit to her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

November 6, 1914- E. L. Sylvester and Curtis Slawson left Tuesday morning for the northern part of the state where they expect to get located in time to hunt big game. In a few weeks their friends expect to enjoy eating venison.
"The Militant Suffragette," a 5 part feature at the GEM tonight. Don’t fail to see this.

November 13, 1914- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell left Thursday evening for Minneapolis to visit Byrl Sylvester and attend the Wisconsin – Minnesota football game on Saturday.

November 27, 1914- E. L. Sylvester, J. D. Bateman, Curtis Slawson, and Will Allen returned last Thursday night from Big Forks where they have spent the past 2 weeks hunting big game. They have had a splendid outing and shipped back 4 fine deer. Their friends have been enjoying some choice cuts of venison since their return.

December 4, 1914- Byrl Sylvester came down from Minneapolis last Wednesday afternoon to spend the Thanksgiving Day with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. He was accompanied by his friend, Lorin Solon, Minnesota’s great football player, who spent a few days here.

December 25, 1914- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Sunday where Mr. Sylvester attended the meeting of the Minnesota State Banker’s Meeting, returning home Thursday.
Byrl Sylvester, who is attending the University, returned from Minneapolis Monday night to enjoy the holiday vacation at home.

=== [ 1915 ] ===

January 1, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester received the pleasing announcement this week of the birth of a daughter at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes, of Duluth, on

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Thursday, December 24. (NOTE: Hettie Marie)
Annual meeting of the Wabasha County Industrial Fair Association- City Hall- Friday January 8 at 2 o’clock. Geo F. Sylvester, Sec.
Travelers, January 4- Mrs. J. D. Bateman
"Daniel Defore"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
"Myreen Waltz"- Mrs. Flores and Mrs. Sylvester

January 8, 1915- E. L. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester on Saturday.
Byrl Sylvester left on Saturday morning for the State University after spending the Christmas vacation at home.
Mr. and Mrs. Emil Schwanbeck entertained a New Years Eve to a 6 o’clock dinner and sleigh ride. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Askew, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Fisk, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Bateman, and Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

January 15, 1915- Mrs. Herman Mussell of Elgin and Mrs. Minnie Timm called on Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Friday.

January 22, 1915- The next meeting of the Travelers Club will be a musical held at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester on Monday February 1. Response to roll call will be quotations from songs.

February 5, 1915- At the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Monday evening the Traveler’s entertained their husbands and a number of friends at their annual musical program. The spacious home was filled with guests who feasted on the delightful program that was rendered. That all enjoyed the evening as well as the program need not be said. There is no entertainment that is so highly appreciated and appeals to the home people like the program rendered by local talent. (Program listed.)
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends last Thursday evening at a 6 o’clock dinner. All enjoyed a very pleasant social evening.
E. L. Sylvester received a message Tuesday morning at 3 o’clock announcing the death of the 8 year old son of his daughter (NOTE: Newspaper error. It should have read "sister."), Mrs. Nellie Dyer at Bemidji. He passed away Monday night death being due to appendicitis. G. F. Sylvester left Tuesday for Bemidji to attend the funeral.

February 15, 1915- Grief stricken friends and schoolmates over flowed the Methodist Church Wednesday afternoon where they gathered to pay a last tribute to little George Dyer, 9 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Dyer, who died Tuesday morning following an operation for appendicitis performed at an early hour Monday. Mr. Dyer is city superintendent of schools. George had been ill for a week but had persistently attended to his school duties. Late Sunday night his case became acute and an operation was deemed necessary. George was born September 12, 1905 at Dawson, Minnesota. His unexpected death cast a gloom over the schools and in respect to his memory the schools closed Wednesday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Charles Gilman and interment was made in Greenwood Cemetery. The floral tribute probably exceeded in profusion and beauty any ever afforded in Bemidji; schoolmates and teachers; the Saturday evening Club and others, individually and collectively seeking to lessen the grief of the stricken parents and other relatives by these tender tributes.
At the cemetery the flowers were banked in a great mound over evergreen boughs. Mrs. A. S. Dyer of Pipestone, mother of Mr. Dyer and G. F. Sylvester of Plainview, brother of Mrs. Dyer came to Bemidji for the funeral. –Bemidji Sentinel.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Tuesday to attend the mid western banquet of the Women’s clubs.

February 19, 1915- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Tuesday.

February 26, 1915- E. L. Sylvester returned from a short business trip to Winona Friday.

March 5, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a 6

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o'clock dinner last Thursday evening.

March 19, 1915- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited in Rochester Saturday.
G. F. Sylvester left for Oak Park Monday afternoon on a short business trip.

March 26, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Saturday on an extended visit to the Panama Exposition. They went by the Southern route and will visit many places of interest before reaching California. On their return they will take the Northern route and expect to visit the most important points of interest.

April 2, 1915- Travelers, April 12- Mrs. Walker
"Thomas Macauly"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Byrl Sylvester entertained about 30 of his gentlemen friends at his home on Broadway last Saturday night in honor of Arno Hahn, who leaves Plainview shortly, having accepted a position as traveling salesman.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Marion, left Tuesday evening for Moline, Illinois to spend Easter at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker.

April 9, 1915- Katherine Sylvester left for Elgin and Winona Monday evening on a visit to friends.

April 16, 1915- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Marion, who have been enjoying a visit to the home of her daughter at Moline, Ill. returned home Saturday.

April 23, 1915- Women’s Clubs to gather here May 4&5 5 o’clock.
Minervan Literary Society will present a comedy "The Raubon Kimona" April 27.
Cast. Rose Jackson- Miss Penelope’s impish little colored maid- Katherine Sylvester.

April 30, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Tuesday evening from a month visit to the Pacific coast. In going to California they took the southern route making stops at the most interesting points. The greater part of their time was spent at the exhibition at San Diego and San Francisco. On their return they came by the Northern route and were delighted with the fine scenic beauty. On their trip they have met and visited many former Plainview people and their outing has proven one of the most enjoyable they have ever taken.

May 7, 1915- (Big article of Convention of Women’s club held in City Hall.)

May 14, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family accompanied by Miss Claire Phillips, departed Tuesday morning for Minneapolis where they will attend the grand chapter of the Eastern Star Lodges and visit among friends. They made the trip by auto.

May 21, 1915- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children of Duluth are guests of her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Katherine, returned Saturday from the Cities. They were accompanied by his sister, Mrs. W. D. Dyer of Bemidji, who remained the guest of relatives and friends until Wednesday.

June 29, 1915- Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children, who have been spending some time at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, left Friday for St. Paul where they will spend some time with relatives and friends before returning to their home at Duluth.

July 2, 1915- Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. arrived Wednesday on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

July 9, 1915- Alvin Dickman, Charles Schneider, Byrl Sylvester, and Fred Hart left Sunday for LaCrosse where they attended the homecoming and celebration, making the trip by auto.

July 16, 1915- Mrs. R. J. R. Baker, who has been spending some time at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, departed for her home at Moline, Ill. Saturday evening.

July 30, 1915- School board: Sec.- G. F. Sylvester, President- Geo. Dickman, Treas.- Dr. J. A. Slocumb.

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Irl Richmond, Alvin Dickman, and Byrl Sylvester left Monday on an auto trip to Clark and Huron, S. D. to enjoy a weeks outing at various points.

August 6, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Buss and son, Rollia, of Princeton, are guests at the E. L. Sylvester home.
L. J. Hardtke purchased lots of E. L. Sylvester on Broadway last week and has already commenced the work of excavating for a new residence.

July 13, 1915- Gun Club Organized- Sec. Treas.- Byrl Sylvester.
G. F. Sylvester and family left Thursday morning on an auto trip to Moline, Ill. They were accompanied as far as Cedar Rapids, Iowa by Ross P. While, who is going on an important mission into Iowa.
Irl Richmond, Byrl Sylvester, and Alvin Dickman returned last Thursday evening from a two weeks trip to Clark, Aberdeen, and other points in S. D. They report a most pleasant trip.

August 27, 1915- Byrl Sylvester, Alvin Dickman, and Fred Hart were Sunday evening visitors at Elgin.
E. L. Sylvester and Andrew Helgerson were business visitors at Wabasha Wednesday.

September 3, 1915- Messrs Alvin Dickman, Byrl Sylvester, Leslie Carpenter, Thaddeus Davey, and Fred Hart were among those form here who attended the last band concert given by the Rochester Band in that city Sunday evening.

September 10, 1915- "Dutch" Sylvester, Plainview’s speedy centerfielder made his first fielding error of the season last Sunday at Lake City and Plainview dropped the 4th game of the series with the Metropolitan by a close score of 4 to 5.
"Sylvester dropped back to deep center, and the batter poked a high fly back of second, just out of the reach of the infielder and "Dutch" came tearing in will full head of steam for the sphere and he managed to get under it, but his speed was so great that the ball bounded from his glove and the game was lost…"

September 24, 1915- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Thursday to spend the day with friends.

October 8, 1915- Lecture on Women’s suffrage at Christian Church. Mrs. Lutz.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Saturday for Minneapolis and from there she goes to visit her daughters at Duluth and Mabel.

October 15, 1915- Miss Marion Sylvester, Marguerite Riley, and Katherine Sylvester spent Saturday in Winona visiting among friends.

October 22, 1915- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon. A picnic supper will be served.

October 29, 1915- Fair results- climbing and training vines- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester first
Hanging baskets- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester First.

November 12, 1915- The Ladies Aid of the Church of Christ will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Thursday. (NOTE: Change of churches.)

November 19, 1915- E. L. Sylvester of Plainview, near Winona, Minnesota, was in the village last Friday on his way to Marble where he will visit his son-in-law and daughter for a few days, Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell. When the big game season opened today it found MR. Sylvester and two companions who joined him after his arrival, out in the Big Fork County banging away at the game. His friends are J. D. Bateman and Curtis Slawson from the same town. Grand Rapids Herald-Review.

November 26, 1915- E. L. Sylvester and J. D. Bateman who have been spending the past few weeks in the northern woods hunting big game, returned home Wednesday night, brining with them two fine deer.

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December 3, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. arrived Saturday on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester lvester.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Bates and son of Rochester were guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester a few days last week.

December 17, 1915- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday afternoon on a short visit to friends.

=== [ 1916 ] ===

January 21, 1916- Reception of new members of Church of Christ
Program- Violin Solo- Katherine Sylvester lvester.
Young Ladies Quarter- Dorothy Slocumb, Ella Smith, Velva Nunamaker & Katherine Sylvester

January 28, 1916- Alumni B. B. Games at High School. Sylvester 5 points – LF.
G. F. Sylvester and C. H. Ritter attended the poultry show at Rochester Saturday.

February 11, 1916- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for the Cities Thursday to spend a few days.

February 25, 1916- Travelers and husbands at Washington Birthday Party – City Hall.

March 10, 1916- Byrl Sylvester spent last week with friends at the University of Minneapolis.

March 17, 1916- Miss Topsey Turvey – 3 Act Comedy Play – Talent Play
Fran Golden – Byrl Sylvester
Admission 25, 35, 50 cents.
Social dance after the play for the benefit of Plainview Band.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained Saturday evening the faculty of the public school together with Prof. and Mrs. J. A. Conaway, Messes Mesdames Warren Woodcock, and J. D. Bateman. A 6 o’clock dinner was served which did much credit to the hostess.
The Travelers Club met with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Monday evening. A good program was rendered… A social hour with light refreshments were enjoyed after the program.

March 31, 1916- At the request of Viola citizens the play "Miss Topsey Turvey" was put on in that village last night for the benefit of the Cooperative Creamery.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a large company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner Saturday evening. After dinner the guests enjoyed a very pleasant social hour.

April 7, 1916- E. L. Sylvester and James A. Carley transacted business at Winona last Friday.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughters Katherine and Marion, Miss Marion Carpenter, and Margarite Rile spent Tuesday in Winona.

April 21, 1916- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a large company of friends last Thursday afternoon.
Park Sylvester is now driving his route with an Auto thus giving the patrons on that route an excellent service. He makes the trip in 3 hours.

April 28, 1916- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Duluth Tuesday morning on a visit to her daughter.

May 12, 1916- G. F. Sylvester and family accompanied by Mrs. DeGroat motored to Rochester Friday.
Grandpa E. L. Sylvester received the announcement of the birth of a son at the home of Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell Jr. at Marble on Saturday May 6. (NOTE: James).

May 26, 1916- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, who has been spending the past few days with her daughter at Rochester, returned home Tuesday. Miss Katherine is improved nicely and is expected home the last of the week.

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8th Grade Commencement- Opera House. June 2, 8 o’clock.
10 cents Admission.
Oration "The American Girl’s Opportunity"- Marion Sylvester

June 2, 1916- Katherine Sylvester was able to return from Rochester Saturday. She has recovered nicely from her operation, but will be compelled to use crutches for a time.

June 16, 1916- Mrs. P. D. Sylvester and daughter left Friday for Des Moines, Iowa on a months visit to the home of her sister, Mrs. Carroll.
E. L. Sylvester and Dr. E. E. Smith made a business trip to Wisconsin last week.

June 30, 1916- Byrl Sylvester motored to Pine Island Tuesday afternoon and was accompanied by Alvin Dickman who has spent the past few weeks there assisting in his brother’s store.
Messrs. and Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and G. A. Stoltz motored to Lake City Monday to attend the Chautauqua and here W. J. Bryan.

July 7, 1916- Fourth celebrated at Fair Grounds.
A party composed of E. L. Sylvester, G. A. Stoltz, E. G. Krause, Walter Briese, John Fisk, Dr. T. J. Moore, Al Posz, B. E. Rohweder, and E. R. Cornwell left Camp Schmoker Wednesday afternoon to enjoy a few days outing on the river.

August 4, 1916- G. F. Sylvester and family left Wednesday morning on an auto trip to Moline, Ill. on a visit to the home of their daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker.

August 18, 1916- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Edwin and Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Bateman, returned from a week’s outing on the river Tuesday evening. They made several good catches including a 7 pound bass, the largest caught this season.

August 25, 1916- E. L. Sylvester and James A. Carley made a business trip to Wabasha Tuesday.
Grandpa and Grandma E. L. Sylvester received a telegram Thursday announcing the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes of Duluth. (NOTE: John).
G. F. Sylvester and family, who have been enjoying an auto trip to Moline, Ill. where they spent some time at the home of their daughter, returned Monday. They had a very pleasant trip and found the roads in very good condition.

September 1, 1916- E. L. Sylvester, Ralph Murray, Mrs. Olive Erding and daughter Miss Elsie made a business trip to Minneiska Tuesday.

September 29, 1916- Rev. Hitchcock leaves M. E. Church after a three year stay in Plainview.
First meeting of Traveler’s Club, October 2- Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck.
A very efficient program committee consisting of Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, Warren Woodcock, Miss French, Lahey and Harrington, have spared no time and energy in preparing programs in booklet forms.

October 6, 1916- E. L. Sylvester and O. E. Murray left for Kasson Tuesday morning on a business trip.
Messrs. and Mesdames E. W. Schwanbeck, G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, and Professors Walher and Strobel attended "Hearts Desire" at Rochester Tuesday night.
G. F. Sylvester and family spent Wednesday in Winona.

October 13, 1916- The Congregational Church Ladies Aid Society held a delightful reception at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Wednesday afternoon in honor of the new pastor’s wife, Mrs. J. L. Jones. Over 60 members and friends of the church responded to the invitation. The hostess was assisted in receiving by Mesdames C. L. Waterman and J. H. Eggers. At the close of a most enjoyable hour, a delicious two course luncheon was served under the supervision of Mesdames C. D. Burchard, T. A. Askew, Frank Kruger and M. M. McFarlin.
G. F. Sylvester took Sunday school class to the Whitewater last Friday where Katherine is improved nicely and is expected home the last of the week.


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They enjoyed the day.

October 27, 1916- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell arrived last Thursday on a visit to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Rochester Tuesday morning to spend the day.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children, who have been spending some time here, departed Saturday for Ames, Iowa where she joined her husband to make their future home. She was accompanied by her brother, Edwin Sylvester who returned home Monday.

November 10, 1916- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day.
E. L. Sylvester, J. D. Bateman, E. G. Krause, and Louis Risley formed a party that left Tuesday afternoon for Big Fork to spend the next 10 days hunting big game. Should a light fall of come they anticipate some real sport.

November 17, 1916- Misses Katherine Sylvester and Marguerite Riley spent Saturday in Rochester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Rochester Monday to spend the day with Mrs. Curtis Slawson.
Mrs. E. J. Buss of Rochester, spent the week with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mesdames E. L. and P. D. Sylvester entertained 60 lady friends on Wednesday and Thursday evening. The E L. Sylvester home was decorated in yellow and white chrysanthemums, the color scheme being carried out in a delicious three course luncheon. A social hour was enjoyed by all present.

November 24, 1916- Dr. T. J. Moore, G. E. Richmond, C. M. Schneider, Byrl Sylvester, and Alvin Dickman left for Minneapolis Friday to attend the Minnesota – Wisconsin Football Game.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day.

December 1, 1916- Messrs. E. L. Sylvester, J. D. Bateman, and E. G. Krause returned last week from their hunting trip, brining home 3 fine deer. Hunting big game has not been as good as usual this season owing to the lack of snow.

December 8, 1916- Prof. W. L. Walker, Jess Slocumb, Francis Finch, Edwin Sylvester, Harvey Bennett and Erwin Briese left for Owatonna Friday morning where they will attend the Boys Club Meeting, returning home Monday night.

December 22, 1916- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and C. C. Anderson were visitors in the 6th grade last week.

=== [ 1917 ] ===

January 5, 1917- All persons having books belonging to Mrs. E. L. Sylvester’s library are kindly asked to return them before January 15 as she is making a new list and would like to have the old list complete.
Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Port Byron, Ill. is spending the week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
The next meeting of the Travelers will be a social affair at the home of Mrs. E. L Sylvester January 8. A picnic supper will be served at 6:30 after which there will be a program consisting of readings, vocal and instrumental selections.

January 12, 1917- Congregational Church elections- Supt. of Sunday Schools- Frank Sylvester.
Travelers Club…
The parlors and dining room were beautifully decorated with cut flowers. About 7 o’clock the summons to the dining room revealed a wealth of goodies, which were served cafeteria fashion. After all had partaken of refreshments, a program was rendered…

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Vocal solo- "The Rosary"- Mrs. Baker…
A rising note of thanks was tendered to Mrs. Sylvester for her hospitality.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. Baker, left for Rochester Tuesday noon to spend the day with friends. From there Mrs. Baker left for her home at Port Byron, Ill.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker spent Saturday with friends in Rochester.
The annual meeting of the Women’s Union was held in the church last Thursday afternoon. Splendid reports were given and the following officers elected: Pres.- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, 1st Vice- Mrs. L. Underwood, 2nd Vice- Mrs. P. D. Sylvester…

January 26, 1917- The Ladies Union held a parlor meeting with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Thursday conducted by Miss Forester. She gave a very interesting talk on the work throughout the state. A luncheon was served at 5 o’clock and a net sum of money was received.

February 2, 1917- Philomathian Literary Society Play "Hunker’s Corners" Wednesday February 7 at 8 PM.
Kathy- fresh from the "ould Sod"- Marion Sylvester.
Admission 10 cents.

February 9, 1917- Byrl Sylvester spent the first of the week in the Cities.

February 16, 1917- Relations with Germany severed by U. S.
The Play "Hunker’s Corners" was given before a large audience in the auditorium Wednesday evening. The Philomathians wish to express their appreciation of the courtesy of the city council who loaned for the occasion chairs from the city hall and wish to thank G. F. Sylvester for his kindness in securing the chairs for them.

February 23, 1917- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Rochester Thursday night to spend a day with friends.

March 16, 1917- Messrs. and Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and E. E. Turner entertained the teachers and a number of young people at a unique party last Friday evening at the home of the former. The entertainment was in the form of a vaudeville and each guest was requested to come prepared to perform some stunt. After the program refreshments was served. That it was a jolly time is best judged by the expressions of those who enjoyed the evening.
Mesdames J. D. Bateman, E. L. Sylvester and E. G. Krause entertained the Ladies Union at the Bateman home Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. B. L. Hoffman before leaving for her Winona home. The gifts were many and beautiful. Luncheon was served at 5 o’clock.
The hospitable home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester was the scene of a most unique and delightful social gathering, last Friday evening, when assisted by Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Turner, they entertained about 30 guests. The parlors were prettily decorated with the national colors. The guests had been bidden to "Come prepared" with some vaudeville stunt, and the effects of the different performers were greeted with hearty applause. The judges awarded the gentleman’s prize to Messrs Goetz and Smith, who, in spite of the prevailing anti German sentiment, delighted their audience with a German duet. The judges could not decide whether Miss Lutz’s readings on a

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Scandinavian dialogue over the telephone by Messes Bahke and Petterson deserved the Lady’s prize. (NOTE: These ladies were teachers in the public school). Lack of space prevents mention of all actors, but especially enjoyable were the "cornet solo" by Mr. Turner and Mr. Sylvester’s reading "Mary had a little Waist." Games followed the decision by the judges, after which delicious refreshments were served.

March 23, 1917- Annual party by Traveler’s Club. City Hall March 19.
Farce- "How the Vote was Won" was enjoyed.
"Iphigene"- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
"Fair Rosamond"- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Home talent play Friday and Saturday "A Prairie Rose."
4 acts western comedy drama.
Byrl Sylvester- a wealthy lawyer.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and G. A. Walker entertained a company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner last Thursday evening. The home was prettily decorated and a delightful repast was served. That the guests enjoyed the evening at this hospitable home need not be said.

April 6, 1917- C. W. Donaldson, C. L. Waterman, Vern Smith, Byrl Sylvester, and Irl Richmond left for Winona Monday morning to attend the meeting of the Scottish Rite.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, spent Monday with Winona friends.
E. L. Sylvester left for Winona Thursday morning to be present at the Scottish Rite Banquet.

April 13, 1917- President Wilson proclaims war on Germany.
Local Banking Institution is Much Improved
Plainview’s Oldest Bank Now has Greatly Enlarged and Neat Quarters
New Fixtures are Installed.
The splendid improvements that have been underway for the past several months at the Plainview State Bank have been completed and not only has the interior been greatly enlarged and beautiful but many conveniences have been added for the benefit of their customers. In addition to enlarging the structure, the interior has undergone a complete change.
The new structure besides giving additional room, is a model of convenience, and will greatly facilitate work. It has taken a number of months to make the many changes, but those who perform their duties there each day say the new conveniences are worth many times the trouble and inconvenience they have had to forego during the time involving the changes.
The main floor has been covered with heavy linoleum, the new fixtures are of plain, but handsomely polished oak, with bronze grill and Tennessee marble base. At the left of the entrance lobby is a most convenient customer office 8 X 9 feet with heave oak desk a most convenient and handy place for customers to transact small business matters. The main lobby has been considerably enlarged. It is 10 feet wide at the front and tapers gradually to the rear, extending 35 feet into the building. The office and work room has been entirely rearranged and enlarged. The cashier and assistant cashier windows open from the main part, while the teller window is conveniently located in the rear where fixtures are made to project beyond the old vault to enclose a larger working space. Beyond the tellers office is a good sized room 11 X 24, useful for many purposes and from which is reached the new safety deposit box vault. Leading from this room are also nicely arranged closets and lavatory.
At the rear of the building are two private rooms each 12 X 12. These are neatly furnished with polished hardwood floor sand oak finishings. Aside from making admirable private offices they may be used for board meetings and other transactions of a private nature that is so often required in a banking institution. These rooms are not only convenient to the main portion of the bank, but are accessible by a rear side

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door, making it unnecessary to enter or retire through the bank proper.
The new interior fixtures are exceedingly attractive, they are of a very handsome design and the plainness of the pattern makes them all the more convenient for cleanliness.
The spirit of enterprise shown by this worthy institution is indeed commendable and all hope to see them continue to grow and progress in the future as they have in the past. There is no institution in Plainview in which the people of this community have had greater confidence, and each year has seen them steadily advance.
E. L. Sylvester and Ed. Engel made a business trip to Wabasha Tuesday to attend to matters before the probate court.

April 20, 1917- The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. P. D. Sylvester and daughter Lois, left Friday evening for Des Moines, Iowa to visit at the home of her sister for a time and then depart for Warner, Canada where they will spend several months at the home of her parents.

April 27, 1917- E. L. Sylvester and son Byrl, drove down from the Cities Sunday with a new car. They were accompanied by M. J. Manchester.
The following party left for St. Paul Friday morning to attend the Shriner’s meeting… E. L. Sylvester… They were joined in the city by B. Sylvester and Irl Richmond.

May 4, 1917- Byrl Sylvester left for the Cities Sunday morning where he took an examination for the ambulance corps, returning home Tuesday night. He expects to return in a few days for further examination and if passed will leave for New York about the 12 or 15th to leave for service in France.

May 11, 1917- Byrl Sylvester left Wednesday for Minneapolis to take another examination for his enlistment in the ambulance corps.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes of Ames, Iowa arrived Monday on a short visit to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, returning home Tuesday.
Postcard From Byrl Sylvester

May 17, 1917 Postmark Chicago, Ill.
Dear Folks,
Arrived here 7:20. Leave 8:25. Balt, Ohio- for N. Y. Chicago is the same old place busy as ever. All well. Will wire from N. Y.
Byrl.
Postcard

May 17, 1917 Postmark Pittsburgh, Pa.
Dear Folks,
Arrived here 10:05. Leaving in 15 minutes for Washington. Many steel mills.
Byrl.
Postcard

May 18, 1917 Postmark N. Y. & Wash R. P. O.
Dear Folks,
Arrived here 8:00. 1 ½ hour stop over. Walked up Penn. Avenue. Saw the capitol. This is a beautiful city.
Regards, Byrl.

May 18, 1917- The first Plainview boy to go to the front in France is Byrl Sylvester, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, of this city. Byrl, who was graduated from the local high school in 1912 and later attended the University of Minnesota and who has many friends among the younger people of Plainview, enlisted in an ambulance corps at Minneapolis last week and last Thursday came to Plainview to say good bye to his folks and friends. He returned to Minneapolis Sunday evening and departed this week for

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New York City from which he will soon take passage for France, with several other University students, who had already enlisted in the service.
For the past two years Byrl has been employed in the Plainview State Bank and has made a most efficient clerk in that institution. By entering the service of our country at this time, Byrl is living up to the traditions of his family by doing his part in the present conflict, for his grandfather served through the Civil War.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Mrs. J. D Bateman motored to Wabasha Wednesday to say farewell to Byrl Sylvester who with 32 University students were going to France, having entered on the Red Cross Ambulance Corps. They will reach New York on Friday evening and sail on Saturday.
Those who left High School for A. work since last week are… Edwin Sylvester.
Letter from Byrl Sylvester

May 20, 1917
S. S. Chicago
(NOTE: - An edited version of this letter appeared in June 22 issue of PLAINVIEW NEWS.
Dear Folks,
Sell it certainly does seem strange to be writing home from somewhere out in the old Atlantic. Have decided to write one of these double pages home once a day while on the water. Will now start my May 20 letter from the time we left Minneapolis.

We arrived in Chicago Thursday morning. Had about a 40 minute wait to take our Balt. & Ohio train. The Balt. & Ohio road takes one East by way of Pittsburgh thence south to Washington, then on through Philadelphia to New York.

We arrived at Pittsburgh about 10:40 Thursday evening. The great steel mills were going full blast and it was a very pretty sight. Next morning I got up at 6:30 to take a look at Harper’s Ferry- Edwin Jr. will remember Old John Brown’s battle at Harper’s Ferry- The Shenandoah and Monongahela (NOTE: actually Potomac) Rivers unite here and it is very beautiful. We arrived at Washington at 8:30 – too late to catch our train to New York so we had 1 ½ hours in which time we went up Penn. Avenue and took pictures in front of the Capitol. Leaving Washington we arrived in Philadelphia a few hours later at 3:30. We were ready to ferry across from Jersey City to New York. Let me say right here- New York is wonderful. I just stood with my mouth wide open for almost an hour until one of the men asked me what I was gaping at- of all the people, traffic, and confusion. Am sure Ma would go right on a "rampage" at once. After arriving at New York we worked continually to get our passports finally passed on and to receive our tickets. We have been on the water two days now. Tomorrow I will write about the first day out.
Love, Byrl.
Letter

May 21, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 22 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS).
Dear Folks,
Just before sailing Saturday at 3:00 P. M. I sent a wire home. Hope you received it O. K. We sailed a little after 3:00 Saturday. It was a wonderful sight. The French Line Dock was packed with fathers, mothers, sisters, and sweethearts, as the old "Chicago" let go.
One after another the different units lined up and gave their college yells- California- Washington- Illinois- Chicago- Old Minnesota could be heard right with the rest. We have about 26 Minnesota men on the boat.
The Chicago has an entirely French crew on board and we are all beginning to understand a little French. Sunday morning a Frenchman woke me up to take my bath. A little later a French barber called to cut my hair. They are very polite and think the world of the American Boys.
Our state rooms are divided into four bunks. There are three men in my

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stateroom- a St. Louis man, one from Yonkers, and another from Penn State- all fine men.
Last night we had a good old Deke meeting. There are fourteen Dekes on board (four from Chicago). All day long we have been running into a rough sea but as yet I have not "fed the fish." Our meals are very good, there being about eight courses to every one (all French).
This afternoon at 3:00 we sighted a ship in the distance. There was wild excitement but it only proved to be a freighter.
Every day at four we have life boat drill. We have a large gun mounted on our bow and a small machine gun on the stern. As near as we can find out we are heading to Northern Africa. Then we will crawl along the coast north to Bordeaux. It is very difficult to write as the boat is almost up side down. Will write again tomorrow.
Love, Byrl.
Letter

May 23, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 22 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Dear Folks,
The past two days have been a corker. We have been in a fierce storm, very rough water. Our life boats are on the third or top deck and we were pitching so this P. M. that water washed into them. We are just about in the middle of the old Ocean now and very often you can hear the boys say that they wish they were safe on land. One good thing though, the subs will not be so liable to see us during rough weather. We are not allowed to have a single light on the decks after dark. All port holes are covered and every precaution taken.
Letter

May 24, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 22 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
I cut my yesterday’s letter short because I felt so rotten. Well we have good news today. Two American War ships are coming out to meet us soon and convoy us the rest of the way. It is reported that we have five million in gold in the hold. That reminds me, before leaving Minneapolis I went down town to the First & Security and had a talk with cashier Lyon. By so doing, I saved about fifteen dollars and a half by cashing in my travelers checks for a draft from the First & Security direct on a Paris bank which I now have with me. You see the value of a franc has diminished about 2 cents for the same amount in our money. My travelers checks would have been good on their face value. That is all.
Well suppose you are having regular warm weather back at home. There is always a cold wind blowing on the ocean, so guess I will not get warmed up until I get to sunny France.
Love, Byrl.
Letter

May 27, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 22 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Dear Folks,
Here is Sunday again and we are about eight hundred miles from land, everything is going nicely. We have been eight days on the water now. This day is fine outside bright and clear. Once can see for miles around. We just passed two boats. When ever we see a boat in the distance everybody hikes out on deck with much

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anxiety. We expect to land at Bordeaux sometime Wednesday morning and I guess we will all be mighty glad to see trees again. This ocean voyage gets very tiresome.
I found out yesterday that a cable gram home would cost only two dollars so I will no doubt cable a very short message upon arriving at Bordeaux. This is Sunday and I suppose you are all taking a spin in that fine car.
This evening there is going to be a little show down in the saloon (that, by the way, means dining room). It will be a good one no doubt as there seems to be a lot of talent aboard.
A man just came tearing in to state that another ship is on the horizon, so will run out to look her over. Before landing will write more and give my address in Paris.
Love, Byrl.
Letter

May 29, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 22 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Dear Folks,
It is now seven o’clock Tuesday evening. About an hour ago we met a convoy boat which was waiting to take us into Bordeaux so that now we expect to get in about eleven o’clock but will not leave the ship until tomorrow.
Last night was a bad one. Very few people slept a great deal as the lights were put out about nine o’clock and we were instructed to lie down with our clothes on and to always be on the alert for submarines. But none were sighted so I think we are getting out of the danger zone.
Yesterday I wrote a letter to both the girls. (NOTE: his sister) Park (NOTE: his brother) no doubt will be able to see this letter. If you notice the stamp reads 25 cents. Well, that means just five cents in our money. Those are centimes in French coin.
Am giving my address below, also on the outside of the envelope. Write soon, as it takes so long for letters to go four thousand miles. Tell all the news – war included.
Love, Byrl.
Write to: 7 Rue Francois Primies
% Norton Harjes Ambulance Corps
Paris, France.
Western Union Telegram
From Bordeaux
To E. L. Sylvester, Plainview, Minn.
SAFE.
Phoned
Post card

May 31, 1917
Dear Folks
Arrived in Paris this A. M. Have orders to be ready to leave for camp in two days. Everybody well and happy. Letter later.
Most sincerely, Byrl.

June 1, 1917- 13th Annual Convention of Federation of Women’s Clubs- St. Charles. Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, E. W. Schwanbeck, F. A. Taylor, M. J. Nerbovig.
Letter

June 1, 1917 Paris
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the June 29 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Dear Folks,
We arrived here in Paris last week Wednesday and have been busy most of the time since getting ready to leave for the camp.
Tomorrow at 6:15 A. M. about twenty of us are to leave for camp about thirty-five miles from Paris where we will study the driving of the cars and do repair work.

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Then in about three weeks we will be assigned to the section in which we are to serve.
The men at the headquarters treat us very fine and will do anything for us. The first day in, when I signed my final papers, the head man wanted, or rather asked me, to go in for flying, but as I originally intended to drive an ambulance, I stuck to it.
Last Sunday we all went out to Versailles, the old palace of the former French kings. It is impossible to find words to describe it. Many miles of beautiful gardens, flowers, and fountains. The Busch Gardens in Pasadena cannot compare with it (statuary which dates back to 16 hundred). Every inch of space is taken up here- trees line all the boulevards. Everything is spick and span.
The French people are able to spot the Americans at once and they are very polite and always ask, "When are your troops coming over?" It is very important that the U. S. organize as soon as possible if we are to check the "Bosche"- (that’s the French name for the Germans) such is the opinion here.
The French people have very peculiar ways of doing things. For instance there are no speed laws. The cars just tear along. Have seen two accidents myself. If a person is hit by a car, the person is considered to blame for the accident and is arrested. Just as soon as an American lands here the police know all about you. A wonderful system, but a lot of red tape connected with it.
Everything all over the country is very high. No butter at all on your bread and no white bread – all dark-hard loaves. Esther’s 40 day biscuits would go pretty fine here.
Well last Saturday afternoon I slicked all up and rode over to the Hotel Ritz in a taxicab to call on the Cromwells. Had to get by about ten bowing porters, butlers, etc. to get up to the main desk and then I inquired for the Mr. Cromwell. The French clerk informed me that they were out so I sat down and wrote a nice note telling them I was from Plainview and knew the Van Horns, etc. Also left my address. Tuesday morning I received a very nice note from Mr. Cromwell asking me to call again. So yesterday afternoon I slicked all up again and was ushered into the suit of rooms. Mrs. Cromwell was in and I had a very fine visit with her. Very fine people living in luxury, but the old "Dillon" stuff must have been displayed for she asked me out to lunch with them but I declined as we are leaving in the morning. But she said to call on them again just as soon as I got back into Paris.
It is very warm here about like our July weather. One can look out most any time day or night and see aeroplanes flying over the city and big munitions trucks hurrying to the front. We are able to get a New York Herald every day so we have some idea of what is going on at home.
Please send the NEWS and write lots of letters. If you hear of anyone who is coming over at this time, let me know and try to send some American tobacco with them. Impossible to buy it here.
Hope you are all well and happy.
Love, Byrl.
7 rue Francois Premier Paris.
(Not necessary- American Amb. Field Service)

June 8, 1917- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion, Mrs. O. W. Nunamaker and daughter Viva, spent Saturday in Rochester.
Post card

June 11, 1917 Paris
Dear Folks,
Everything is going fine. We are now out at camp. Expect to be at the front in 3 weeks. Please send red book and papers as reading is very scarce. Write often to 7 rue Fran. Per. Red Cross. White bread & spuds are a thing of the past.
Love, Byrl.
From now on send all letters, etc-

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B. E. Sylvester
% Credit Lyonnais
Correspondence Dept.
Paris, France
DO NOT WORRY
Byrl.
Letter
Sunday- June 17, 1917 Paris
"Somewhere in France"
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the July 20 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Dear Folks,
Have been so busy the last ten days that I have not found time to write home. We are now out at "a camp" about thirty five miles from Paris, as the camp was just organized a few weeks ago. Things are not quite as handy as they will be in the future. This is my first experience with real army camp life and I can say I like it very much. There is at present over one hundred men here, although we are ambulance men, never-the-less while in camp we are treated just as a soldier, directly under French army officers. We are up in the morning at seven sharp, called by a bugle, all assemble and go through about a half hour of regular U. S. Army drill Breakfast at eight. At about nine we are put to work on jobs around camp such as cutting grass, digging ditches, pounding rock and various other jobs- which must be done. At eleven o’clock we rest until twelve. At this time we receive lunch. At 2:30 we again go to work until 4:30. We now go on a march of about five miles. Supper at six. Everyone must be in bed by ten-fifteen. Any slip up on these regulations and the offender must suffer- a regular system I should say.
Our meals consist of very plain food- rye bread, meat and soup and once in awhile beans as a luxury. The work, walks, and food are making one as hard as nails.
There are about twenty-five men from Minnesota in a bunch here. We will be the next section to be called out. A section is made up of forty-five men. Our section will be number 62 known as the Minnesota Section. From the latest reports we will leave here in about two weeks for the "Front."
France is a very beautiful country, very similar to southern Minnesota at this time of year. The strawberries are ripe, all garden truck, the roses are in bloom and the farmers (the ones that are left) are now cutting hay. On the last boat many of the men received papers from home and the Minnesota men certainly were anxious to see a Minneapolis paper dated May 27th and arriving here June 16. I knew that my address would be 7 rue Francois Pr. Paris before leaving home. I could have left it with you but I do hope to receive a letter by the 15th of July. This makes my third letter home. One on the boat, the second in Paris, and this one here at camp. Hope you received them all. Everyone is very glad that they got into this service because we are treated very fine at headquarters and every man is in it for the one purpose- to wipe out the "Bosche".
Am wondering what you are all doing back home this Sunday morning. It is now twelve o’clock here – noon. We are just seven hours ahead of your time over there. That means five o’clock in the morning. You must be all sleeping soundly unless those cats that used to play around the sleeping porch are busy.
How is the National going? Do you take many trips and keep the car up? Is Edwin Jr. weeding the onions? (NOTE: Many Plainview youth worked summers weeding onion fields for 50 cents or so a day.)
Saw by the paper just before leaving that Curt Johnson had joined the American Ambulance Service. Well the American Amb. has tried to pull a lot of dishonest stuff with its men, putting them on to driving trucks, etc… So that out of the two hundred American men that came over in the Chicago when we did, over one hundred came over and joined the Norton-Harjes or ambulance corps. So you see the corps we

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joined is absolutely the best.
When you write, tell me all the news. Send the papers and anything it might say about men who have come over or any that are coming soon.
While out along the woods the other day I plucked a wild rose "somewhere" in France. Keep it. There is also a very good poem I cut out of a paper which means a lot just now.
Much love,
Byrl.
The Reveille
(Bret Harte, 1860)
Hark I hear the tramp of thousands
And of armed men the hum:
Lo! A nation’s hosts have gathered
Round the quick alarming drum-
Saying, "Come,
Freemen, Come."
Ere your heritage be wasted," said the quick alarming drum.
"Let me of your heart take counsel:
War is not of life the sum:
Who shall stay and reap the harvest
When the autumn days shall come?"
But the drum
Echoed, "Come!"
Death shall reap the braver harvest," said the solemn sounding drum.
"But when won the coming battle,
What of profit springs therefrom?
What if conquest, subjugation,
Even greater ills become?"
But the drum
Answered, "Come!"
You must do the sum to prove it," said the Yankee-answering drum.
"What if, "mid the cannon’s thunder.
Whistling shot and bursting bomb,
When my brothers fall around me,
Should my heart grow cold and numb?"
But the drum
Answered, "Come!"
Better there in death united, than in a life a recreant - come!
Thus they answered- hoping, fearing,
Some in faith and doubting some,
Will a trumpet-voice proclaiming,
Said, "My chosen people, come."
Then the drum
Lo! Was dumb.
For the great heart of a nation throbbing answered,
"Lord, we come!"

June 22, 1917- All Plainview called to colors to aid Red Cross.
First Plainview Boy to France writes of trip.
Byrl Sylvester in Letter to Parents, relates Experience During Long Voyage
Across Waters
No Submarines are sighted

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Great Precautions Taken During Night – All Glad to See Land After Perilous
Eight Day Journey
As all are thoroughly interested in the boys who have offered their services in the present war we take pleasure in giving a few items from a letter from Byrl Sylvester, who recently arrived in France, describing his trip across the water… (NOTE: Excerpts from May 20, 21, 23, 24, 27 & 29 letters follow.)
G. F. Sylvester and family left for St. Paul Tuesday where he will attend the Banker’s convention.
Letter
Sunday- June 24, 1917 "Camp"
Dear Folks,
Another week has gone by. No letters as yet from home and I am about six weeks away. Am sure there will be one by the 4th of July- so I hope.
The past week has been a dandy here. It rained for five days straight. Was cold and disagreeable, but the routine of the camp went on just the same. We are all provided with slickers and boots so that we are comfortable during the daytime, but at night, out in the open it is very hard to keep warm, but after two weeks of it, I could sleep out in Alaska, I believe. Each man is allowed two blankets, no pillow, but my extra shirts answer the purpose.
General Pershing and his staff are not in Paris, and are about the whole show at present. One day last week one of the high up U. S. Officers called to inspect the camp. It seemed might good to see a U. S. uniform in camp. The uniforms that we received are the regular English type. Very neat with red cross buttons. We received a summer weight one now and in the fall a heavy one for winter. Section 61 leaves tomorrow for the Front. Our section #62 will follow within a few days so that next Sunday, will no doubt be my last one before going to the Front. We are now about forty-five miles from the Line, but very often we can hear the distant boom of the big guns.
While on leave the other day, I took a little walk through the woods near here and ran across an old man cutting down huge trees. His wife, I should judge about sixty-five, and four small children, the oldest one about ten years old, were swinging the axes. One girl was sawing wood. Think of these poor people out doing that kind of work and then tell me whether they need help over here or not? Over there where everything is plentiful- three meals a day, and a pick on Sunday of chicken or ice cream are not brought on. Why if chickens should show up here, the inhabitants would create a riot.
Since writing my first long letter, I have heard that if letters sent over are lengthy, the censors will throw them out entirely. I have written the following letters to date- May 31- June 6- June 17- June 24. The way things are going now it’s hard to tell whether you have received any of them. Wished you would to into Nettekoven’s Hotel and buy a box of El’ Palencia cigars- large size- and send them over to me, as it is impossible to buy them over here. If you write my name and address plainly on the wrapper and state that I am a volunteer in the Norton Harjes Amb. Corps, I think I will receive them without duty. It is worth trying anyway. Am keeping as tight a hold on my money as possible. Hope you are all well and happy. Best regards and…
Love Byrl.
B. E. Sylvester
American Red Cross
7 rue Francois Primier
Paris, France
Volunteer in Norton Harjes Amb. Corps
P. S. P. S.
All letters sent after I arrive at the Front will be forwarded from the Paris Office. Byrl.

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Letter
Thursday- June 28, 1917 France
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the July 27 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)

Dear Folks,
Just received orders a short time ago that Sec. 62, the one which I am in, is to leave here in the morning (that is the camp.) We go down to Dijon – Southern France – where we get our cars which will be Fiats – From Dijon we leave for the Front. The order came sooner than I really expected but that’s the way things are done here. Tuesday evening my uniform and equipment arrived here at camp. It seems to be a perfect fit and am more than satisfied with it.
Some of the men went into Paris yesterday on leave and on returning reported that a number of U. S. officers could be seen.
Well next week Wednesday will be the 4th of July. Was just thinking of how and where I spent the last 4th. It was at home. We had a celebration out at the Fair Grounds and I played ball. One year can certainly change things a great deal. Suppose you will all go out for a big time this year. The 4th to us will be just about the same as any other day here.
On the last mail a number of the Minn. Boys received newspapers from home dated the 12th and 15th of May so you see we are not far behind the news over here. Just ran into a cousin of Rebecca Wolf’s who is over here in my sec-62. Had quite a talk with him and he spoke about meeting Nettie at Hamline (NOTE: Byrl’s sister Nettie attended Hamline University.) We have a number of wealthy and well known people out here at camp at present. May have donated Packard cars to the Service but are pitching right in and doing their share. At first they are soft and get sick of the food, but then they come to it and eat with the rest.
One thing I neglected to bring with me and that is a good leather toilet article case. There are also several other things which I will have to buy in Paris before leaving for the Front. We have just seven hours there and I will have to speed around so as not to go out half-cocked.
E. Ames-McKenzie and myself were all very lucky to all get into the same section. We have worked while here and there is a great deal more ahead of us. Hope I receive at least one letter from home before leaving for the front.
Address your letters the same as before. Will write as soon as we are located "out there."
Love, Byrl.

June 29, 1917- (Second letter of Byrl published)
Arrives safely in France and Goes to Camp.
Second Letter from Young Sylvester Brings Glad Tidings of His Safe
Arrival in Old World
Paris Sights Most Beautiful
Says French People are Very Polite But Have Peculiar Ways – No Speed
Laws for Automobiles There
A second letter from Byrl Sylvester, a member of the American Ambulance Corps in France, has been received and we are permitted to publish the contents, which we know will be read with interest by all. In part he says: (NOTE: Letter dates June 6 printed.)
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Edwin Jr. and Rob Roy Harden left by auto Monday afternoon for Minneapolis to attend the Convention of the Christian Church held at Mounds on Lake Minatonka.
Post card

July 4, 1917
Dear Folks:

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Leaving Dijon within two hours for the Front. Looks like the Alsace Lorraine country – 35000 – U. S. A. In Paris today. Well and happy. Will write from "out there".
Love, Byrl.

Letter
Friday the 13th, July 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the August 10 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
"Somewhere in France"
Dear Folks,
At last your first letter and paper of June 19th just arrived. The letter no doubt has been following our sec.-62 from place to place until it has found us. Just about two months after my departure from home. It is needless to say that your letter was read and reread many times. A good old American stamp looked might good.
Since my last letter or card rather from _____, many interesting things have taken place. In the first place we are out in it. The first night here at our headquarters I walked one half miles to the birth place of Pres. Poincare of France. Just think of the last line a minute. The birth place of Poincare. He is a very great man, as it were. I wonder if you still read the interesting volumes Dad bought for us several years ago. Those fine old black covered books with everything in them from A to Z. Edwin Jr. liked to read them once in a while if I am correct.
Our Sec. 62 is a very good one. Our French Leu. is very good to us. The leader of our sector, Mr. Pierce, is a Boston man and fine to get along with. We are also very lucky to have with us two expert French cooks from a Paris hotel. Our food is plain, but very good. This is, it hits the spot. All our cars are Fiat make – brand new ones just from the factory – with four speeds ahead and a wonderful oiling system.
Now if our sleeping quarters could be taken care of the same way as the food, all would be "rosy" but in our work, beds are seldom found. For the past month not a bed spring in France has held me up during quiet slumbers. At present our habitat is an old barn. It took quite a while to get used to the fleas and bed bugs, the rats running over your back. (Even "Ma’s" rat poison could not check the vermin). But now all these companions are not noticed, in fact I rather like them. Shall I train a few and bring them home?
Yesterday – July 12 – I had my first experience at a rush hospital (that is one which acts as a central point to send the men back to base hospitals.) Twenty men in our section were called out to do twenty-four hours of work, which means very little sleep. The cars line up in rotation, as the wounded are carried in. It is our duty to rush them back to Base Hospitals – as it happened I was placed on car Number one with a Minneapolis man by the name of Gregory – A Shriner (Zurah). A fine fellow to work with. During the afternoon and all night we had three trips carrying twenty-one men. No lights are allowed on the cars because of planes. And it is necessary to drive fast – but careful – if possible. While out here I have seen some very interesting sights. Only this A. M. I saw five French and two Bosche planes engage in a wonderful air battle, concerning which I will tell you sometime later. Also saw four captive balloons and various other modern devices of warfare.
No one who has not been over here during the war can ever realize what is going on. Not until one is able to see with his own eyes will he believe that men, human beings, are being taken away day and night. A few of the sights I saw last night will never be forgotten. Men, bloody and mud-caked, jaws set, enduring killing pain. One case upset me for just a few moments. We had a hurry call. Our man was on the stretcher just as he was brought in. As we picked him up, in the moonlight he was softly moaning. He opened his glassy eyes, the tears started to trickle down and he looked about ready to give up. Looking down I saw that both his feet were gone. I tell you there was one ambulance that took the bumps might slow that night. But then these things are all in the game. There seems to be no other way.

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Am glad to hear Edwin’s onions are being taken care of in good shape, that he is doing my old work of sweeping out at the Bank and also mowing the lawn, which must look very pretty right now. Many times have I thought of that fine car at home, etc., but am mighty glad I am here right now. Dad and Edwin must be regular drivers by this time. By the way, gas is one twenty-five a gallon here. Only the government sells it. A written permit is required so we must be very saving.
Ninety-eight men subject to draft at home. That’s more than I expected. Let me know who are the lucky ones. The ones I mean to be able to serve the old U. S. A. Above all things, do not take much stock in American newspaper head lines. It’s all fed up stuff.
You asked if I wanted anything sent here. Try to send over the NEWS and a magazine or two. Also try to send a carton or box of twenty packages of Camel cigarettes. These little luxuries will be greatly appreciated. Speak to Ben Rohweder (NOTE: Plainview druggist) about the cigarettes. He will get them for you. Then you can mail them to me. Be sure to state that I am a volunteer in the Ambulance service and am sure they will reach me all O. K. The letters will not come so often from this end for sometime as I expect to be very busy starting tomorrow again.
Love, Byrl.

July 20, 1917- (Byrl’s letters)
He Likes camp life on French Front.
Real Army Life is Pleasure to Byrl Sylvester who is With Ambulance Corps There
Says France is Beautiful Country
(NOTE: Letter dated June 17 is printed here.)
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Marion, left for Winona Tuesday morning to spend the day. They were joined by Mrs. Sylvester in the afternoon and returned home in the evening by Auto.
Letter
Friday July 20, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the August 17 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
"Somewhere in France"
Dear Friend Mr. Mack, (NOTE: Mr. Mack was the Plainview News’ editor)
Before leaving home in May you asked me to write concerning my work while a volunteer in the Ambulance Service. As I have now spent one week of real work on the firing line, I find there are many things which should be of interest.
Our section, which is No. sixty two, was very fortunate in being placed in a very important sector – once which I am sure you have read about in the newspapers at home, but which the censor will not allow me to name. We have twenty Fiat cars in the section – two men working on each car. Ten cars work or carry the wounded for twenty four hours, then the ten which are at rest are sent in. We are not allowed to carry lights on our cards – in fact, the large supply trucks and the various other cars do not carry lights. Dark rainy nights occur often, so that one must keep his eyes pealed or things are liable to be messed up. The reason for no lights is that the Boche planes could easily see us and note the conditions.
In this branch of the service many terrible sights come before us, but one soon learns not to get dizzy at the sight of blood, deep ragged wounds, and men in their last efforts to hang on to that which seems most dear. Sherman’s definition of war is way off when applied to the present conflict.
As our base is near an aviation camp, we have seen some very interesting air battles. The Boche’s fly high while the French fly low and very fast. From a distance it is hard to distinguish our planes from those of the enemy. One way to tell though is by the color of the smoke after the shell is broken. Boche shells give off black smoke, while the French shell leaves white puffs after the explosion.
Several of the towns around us have been shelled. The Boche get the range on

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one of the villages, and, by the way, they are very accurate in their shooting. Just after dinner last Tuesday, enemy shells started to drop within a radius of a mile around our village. A shell can be heard in the air before it hits its object. There is a distant boom sounding far away. It grows louder. Then there is a sound similar to that of a sky rocket. When the shell hits, it bursts with a loud report, scattering shrapnel about. One shell dropped within a flock of our cars in the village street. I picked up a piece of shrapnel about fifty feet from our cars as large as a base ball. As a rule the people are on their guard and all the Ambulance drivers wear steel helmets, also gas masks, for the latest thing contrived is the gas shell which hits and gives off deadly gas.
We have carried many German wounded who are well taken care of by the French. One of the enemy talked quite a little with us, saying among other things that the poor German people are sick and tired of the war and pray daily for peace, but the rich Germans are the opposite. The poor fellow had been wounded by a French shot and had crawled for three days and nights into our lines.
The French people think the Americans are about the best people on earth. They certainly do treat us very fine and are willing to do a great deal for us. One could almost see a wave of good feelings sweeping through France when Our own Boys landed here. And let me say right here that Old Glory floating over a GREAT MANY of our troops looked might good to us on French Soil, for "It is up to America now."
Hope you are all well and happy back there on peaceful and plentiful Greenwood Prairie. News from home is most welcome.
Most sincerely,
B. E. Sylvester
P. S. P. S. Style in paper and ink are lacking in a time like this, Mr. Mack. Byrl.
Letter
Sunday July 22, 1917
"Somewhere in France"
Dear Sister Nettie,
Just received your welcome letter and the "smokes." The cigarette caused a "riot" in camp as they are the first American ones to arrive. Some of the men having expected tobacco for several weeks were all eager to know how they were sent, etc… Thanks for yourself and Fay (NOTE: Fay is Nettie’s husband who was a doctor in St. Paul) for sending them. Nothing could have been quite as pleasant. Fay guessed the brand all right.
Our section has been out here at the front for two weeks now. We have seen all kinds of work. Being busy day and night. Was not in Paris when the troops arrived so it would be impossible for me to locate the Doctor’s boy you spoke about. The movements of our troops here are kept a secret. The same way as they are at home. Our section is working with one of the best divisions of the French Army and in a locality which am sure is familiar to you. We have several young French doctors here who certainly know their work. We are located at a rush hospital in close touch with the trenches. The wounded receive their first real aid here. Every wounded man that comes in receives an injection to prevent lock jaw and, in serious cases, medicine to tide the mess over is given too. It is our work to carry these men as quickly as possible to different base hospitals according to the nature of the wound. Where they are operated on or not as the case may be.
During the past week many French and "Boche" wounded have been brought in. Our car alone has carried one hundred thirty-two. Once certainly learns all there is to know about night driving in this work. We eat and sleep whenever we get a chance, which is not often. After the people here have had three years of the same thing, it gets to be a business rather than a short undertaking. We had one rather funny case. A man came in, was apparently all in-put on a stretcher and when we took out

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the stretcher at the hospital, the boy started walking down the street. It seems he had only a flesh wound in his hip. If all our cases were like this one how different it would be. Many we take just in back of the hospital never to return. Large trenches are dug and the bodies are put in very close, side by side. These places we have notices are NOT few and far between.
The organization system and all of this war game is wonderful, but I would venture to say that if all concerned should see what we are seeing at present, there would be a change. If America can only "SAVE" the day! Am sorry that my French language is rather limited, but am learning a few words at that. We are being treated very fine considering the circumstances. Hope that you, Fay, and the youngster are well and enjoying the summer in Northern Minnesota. Nettie, a box of that fine fudge you used to make would prove a great treat away over here.
Write soon,
Most sincerely,
Byrl.
Letter

June 22, 1917
(NOTE: This letter was taken from the PLAINVIEW NEWS August 24 issue.)
Dear Folks,
Have neglected to write for several days, but will now make up for it. Two weeks in the service at the front now. Have written Mr. Mack giving him a little idea (that is as far as I am able) of the kind of work I am in.
It seems that letters have a way of coming all at once. Have received fifteen in the last two days, Nettie and Meta both writing. Also a fine carton of cigarettes from Nettie – the first American tobacco to arrive in camp.
Just finished reading the home newspapers. So Agnes and Lewis are married. I hope they are happy.
Right now we are on the job for ten days straight. Ten cars night and day plenty to do. We are getting it down to a system and I like it very much, that is I mean I am willing to offer myself for the work. Today is a fine clear one and the planes are having some dandy encounters. On the way coming down this afternoon from a village up the line, we stopped for gas and I saw a Boche plane directly over us. It was painted snow white. Our batteries fired at it several times.
Last week I was a little off my feed but am feeling fine now. It is sure good news to know that the crops are coming fine at home and that the boys are getting ready. It means a great deal. Will not write a very long letter this time but will write again soon. Some good American bitter sweets would go nice here.

July 27, 1917- (Byrl’s Letter)-
After Week of Training He is Sent to Front.
(NOTE: Letter written June 28 is printed here.)
Letter
Sunday July 29, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the August 24 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Somewhere
Dear Folks,
Have not heard from home for over a week, but expect a letter within the next two days. Just received a letter from Nettie dated June 30. It came right along you see.
The past week has been a very exciting one for me. We are now working a post right up at the front. I have been on the forty-eight hours this trip. Hope to be relieved soon. Last night our car was called out early in the evening. We were sent to a certain battery where our load was waiting for us. Just as we arrived for our load, the guns were in action. My first near up view of the real stuff. I only had time for one good look as it was necessary we make speed out of the place, but there THEY were sliding in load

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after load. A second, and then a terrific noise, a huge spurt of red fire and with it all the earth trembling all around. There is something fascinating about it. A continual roar, and to think that day in and day out this has been going on for three years (and I believe we will see four years of it.)
During my first twenty-four hours out at our extreme post (which is mostly underground) three of us on a little side trip slid down a path some distance and, peering out through the brush, I caught my first glimpse of Germany – that is just for the time being. There were Boche trenches some distance away and here there was real action. On my first trip out I wondered whether or not I would be able to sleep, but one soon becomes accustomed to the terrific roar and can sleep – that is it took several jolts to awaken me from sound slumber. Oh! This war game is a wonderful problem and I would enjoy telling about the organization etc. of the troops, but I want you to receive this letter.
By this time of course you have taken your trip up to the cities. Hope you have a fine run. It is very fine to learn that Plainview is doing its bit to help the Red Cross. The people at home can feel assured that the money raised is going for the best of causes. The French papers give us quite a lot of news along these lines.
By the way, Mr. Lawrence, son of the Lawrence in the Big Joe Mill at Wabasha is working right in my division now. Just happened to be talking with him the other night and discovered that his home used to be at Wabasha and he knows the county real well. Right away we seemed like old friends.
It will soon be the first of August. Park has a birthday on the 8th and Edwin Jr. on the 10th. Well, birthday greetings, boys. Here’s hoping you see many more coming as they will after the war.
What kind of weather are you having over there now and how is the crop prospects – corn and potatoes for instance? Here, the crops are fine. Warm days – cool evenings.
You will receive this letter about the 20th of August, not any sooner than that. No it will be a week later now as the boats leave every Saturday.
Send reading matter and a box of Hershey’s nut bar chocolate would go fine. Also chewing gum. These luxuries are not to be had over here.
Write often.
Love, Byrl.

August 3, 1917- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained as a weekend guest, Paul G. Miller of Fort Snelling. Mr. Miller is a college friend of Rob Roy Harden. He is to receive his commission as second Lieutenant August 15.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent a part of the week with Mrs. J. D. Bateman at St. Mary’s hospital in Rochester. She reports Mrs. Bateman as improving.
Misses Marion Sylvester and Francis Burkhardt went to Rochester Wednesday afternoon on a short visit to friends.
Letter
Saturday August 4, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the September 7 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
Somewhere in France
Dear Folks,
This is going to be a very short letter as we are very busy. Just received your letter and picture of car. Very good. At present we are in a very hot place. Lots doing. Went on the job Monday morning for five days and nights. Rain all the time. Very wet. By the way, I am in need of a pair of leather boots. Alvin Dickman (NOTE: Neighbor of the Sylvesters and his father ran a clothing store in Plainview. Alvin later was a soldier.) has a pair and I would like to have you see him. Have him get a pair like his, only 1 size larger. I want a very good pair of tan leather boots – buck skin lacings common not quite up to my knees. Also 4 pair of medium weight (wool) socks – not the heavy ones – 10 1/2

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size. Get these as soon as possible. %7 rue Francies – Paris – and insure the package. Parcel post. When it rains here it is very tough cold weather and very disagreeable. The war is bound to last at least one more year.
All well-
Love, Byrl.
PSPS Boots are 35 to 40 dollars over here. Be sure to get a very good pair there.
Good Luck. Byrl.

August 10, 1917- (Byrl’s Letter)
Plainview Young Man Finds Life Lively on French Front
Byrl E. Sylvester, with Ambulance Corps, Dodges Death in Night Battle While
Experiencing First Active Service on Firing Line—Witnesses Air Battle Between
French and German Planes
We are privileged to reproduce the following letter received recently from Byrl Sylvester which we know will be read with deep interest by all. After two months absence he has received his first letter and paper from home:
(NOTE: The letter written July 13 is printed here.)
G. F. Sylvester and family left Thursday morning on an auto trip to Moline, Ill. on an extended visit to their daughter, Mrs. Baker.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Rochester Friday and were accompanied home by Mrs. J. D. Bateman who has made a rapid recovery from her recent operation.
E. L. Sylvester and Peter Wood spent Tuesday at Camp Schmoker and report a fine catch of bass and pickerel.

August 17, 1917- (Byrl’s Letter)
After Week’s Real Work on the Firing Line He Writes Home
Byrl Sylvester, of Ambulance Corps, Graphically Describes Condition on
French Front
Enemy Air Bombs Drop Near
(NOTE: Letter written July 20 to Mr. Mack, publisher of the Plainview News, printed here.)
A few lines from Geo. F. Sylvester informs us that they arrived at Port Byron Ill. Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock after a run of 350 miles. He states that grain and corn through eastern Iowa are looking fine.
PLAINVIEW NEWS.
Sunday, August 19, 1917
Dear Folks,
For the past week our Section 62 has been at rest. We are located at present in a fine little village on the banks of a fine spring, a very good place for a camp. No telling how long we will be here though. Have received all your letters so far, also the PLAINVIEW NEWS. Notice my letters are being printed in the paper at home. Had I known this was going to happen, perhaps I would have taken more pains with them, but as letter writing is way out of my line, you will have to suffer the consequences. Last Wednesday, a few of us visited some of our troops, training over here. I tasted some good old white bread, the first in three months – better than any cake I have ever eaten.
Nettie has written several dandy letters and received a nice letter from Mrs. LaCraft a short line ago. Am anxious to receive the home draft list. The crop reports from Minnesota are might fine, but many of our men from the west report dry weather. The marines report one hundred thousand troops over here at a time. It will take many times those numbers to make an impression on the well protected "Bosche lines."
My vacation of ten days is due very shortly and will either go over to London or down to Southern France. The six months will be up December 1st, but I am unable to tell my plans at present. It all depends upon conditions at that time. At all events I want

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to be home Christmas time. Then if my services are still needed I will enlist in the artillery or flying corps.
I am in the best of health and therefore there is no need to complain.
Letter
Tuesday August 21, 1917
(NOTE: An edited version of this letter appeared in the September 14 issue of the PLAINVIEW NEWS.)
"Somewhere in France"
Dear Folks,
The past few days have been bright and clear affording a fine opportunity for aeroplane battles. Just about noon yesterday a "Boche" plane flew over the lines and was sighted by two French planes a short distance from our cars. As this very thing happens frequently, we thought nothing of it.
The "Bosche" plane was flying very high and out of range of several anti-aircraft guns which shot many times to no effect. As we watched, all of a sudden a French plane, which before this time had been hidden in the clouds, flew into view above and to the right of the "Bosche" plane. With a sudden downward swoop, the French plane opened fire and it was a thrilling sight to see the "Bosche" plane suddenly dip downward and flop over and over to the ground. Imagine a large bird with a broken wing falling and the effect is about the same.
It seemed that the remains of the fallen plane must be about one half mile away, at any rate several of us started on a wild run to see what had happened. Well it proved to be three miles to the place where the broke plane hit the ground. So that after a cross country run and swimming across a canal, which happened to be in the way, we arrived in a potato field (fine crop here this year) in view of the once well made German plane just as the dead pilot and his wounded observer was being carried away. One of our men remarked, "Well there will be one ‘Bosche’ the Kaiser will not be able to decorate."
The people came in a hurry from all directions and were soon ripping the plane to pieces for souvenirs. Guards were stationed all around the debris to keep the crowd away, but I managed to slide through and get the "Bosche" number plate together with several pieces showing the construction of the wings.
The plane had a large black and white iron cross painted on her side and dated nineteen seventeen. So that it was one of the new types.
The engine was a six cylinder Mercedes-Benz, there being four valves to a cylinder. It was interesting to note that the tires were an American make. The material used and the workmanship throughout was perfect.
War reports during the past three days have been the most encouraging so far this summer. The British are advancing and taking prisoners in Flanders. The French have just taken five thousand prisoners in the _____ sector and the Italians are on the offensive and now with the cooperation of our own troops, it seems that something must give way. The "soldier farmers" have finished cutting the wheat here. There is a

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good yield, and it is a good quality. But it lacks a great deal of quantity.
I fear that some of your letters have gone astray, as yet I have not received the several packages you mentioned in your last letter. I am sure that when they arrive I shall declare a holiday, if not a birthday. Thanks very much for sending them. I appreciate it very much. Am in the best of health and therefore there is no need to complain.
Write soon.
Love, Byrl.

August 24, 1917- (Byrl’s letter)
Sylvester Gets First Glimpse of Enemy Country
Plainview Boy on French Front Witnesses Real Action in German Trenches
War Game Wonderful Problem, He States
Reports Corps There Fine With Warm Days and Cool Nights – No Luxuries
To Be Had
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester are just in receipt of two letters from their son, Byrl, in France, which we know will be of real interest to our readers.
(NOTE: Letters written July 22 & 29 printed here.)
Edwin Sylvester Jr. left Saturday for Ames, Iowa on a visit to the home of his sister, Mrs. R. J. Holmes.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Rochester Saturday where they were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Buss over Sunday.
Letter
Monday August 27, 1917
In France
Dear Folks,
Your letters are coming every week now. Received the draft list and the box of cigars mailed from Rochester. Very fine. Thanks. Have given several of the smokes away and the men are certainly delighted with them.
We just received the news that the Norton Harjes Ambulance sections had been taken over by the American Army. It is too early to tell just at present how things will be reorganized but we will all stay in and serve out our six months – unless unforeseen things show up. It is no more than natural that now our troops are coming over and the U. S. will soon have her own men on the front that we go under control of our own government. At present the dope is that after the six months are up we will receive honorable discharge and have the opportunity of staying on in the ambulance service or choosing some other branch of the army. At all events, I want to go home before getting into something else. It is too early yet to tell what one can do. At all events I do not want to be branded as a slacker. Notice that Irl Richmond is on the list. How does Irl feel about it? There is a big chance that the men that are being drafted now will never go near the trenches over here, of course no one can tell. We know though, that the U. S. Govt. is certainly shoving things right along and we are way ahead of the program as far as preparation is concerned. It seems that the allies have just found their feet during the past week, are cooperating and going ahead. Russia is the big disappointment at present. Just received a fine letter from Meta (NOTE: Byrl’s sister) today and hear every week from Nettie. Very fine. Noticed the bank statement in the paper. Very good, also that the crops are big. Fine. The improvements on Water Street must be very fine. Whose idea was it? Edwin Jr. must be getting ready for school now. He should sail to it and if there is any chance for him to take military training, let him do it.
Am mailing three snap-shots – one of our car while on duty just after a call. Notice the helmets and the gas masks strapped to our sides. The two others are of a gink whom you have seen before and who will soon be home. Write often mother. Am in the BEST of health.


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Love, Byrl.

August 31, 1917- G. F. Sylvester and family returned Monday evening from an auto trip to Port Byron, Ill. where they have spent a few days at the home of their daughter.
Letter
Thursday, September 6, 1917
France
Dear Folks,
Have not written for several days. We have moved back to the front and are all back on the job. Once again we are under fire. The past few nights we have had a wonderful moon. The "Bosche" planes have been very active dropping bombs in several of the camps and villages. A few nights ago one flew over and, spotting our white tents,, he dropped six near our camp but he failed to accomplish his purpose. Most of the men lost a nights sleep out of it, sitting on a distant hillside. We were a little handicapped because at this place we have no "abris" or underground quarters.
The nights are already getting cold and we will soon be in the rainy season. Heavy coats come in handy at this time. Have received your smokes sent August 10. Also the pictures and your letter of August 14. The pictures are very good. You all look happy and in the best of health. Notice my letters are appearing in the NEWS at home. Please see that just the ones that might be of interest are given to Mr. Mack. I don’t like too much of that stuff.
In my last letter I spoke about the ambulance work here being taken over by American officers. We will all serve out our six months. I am trying to make plans now to get home at Christmas time. As it takes nearly two months to get mail over and back, I believe it would be a good idea to send over some money. I will need at least one hundred by November first, if Dad will write to Mr. Lyon Case in the First & Security Minneapolis. The Minneapolis bank will send over any amount and have it credited to my account in Paris. The bank here is the Credit Lyonnais. The correspondent bank over here for the First and Security. Just have the First and Security send the amount over credited to my account here. McKenzie had it sent this way and it came through fine.
Who took the dandy pictures of the house and lawn? Edwin Jr. looks like a regular ______ in those long pants. I’ll bet they are a pair of my old ones at that. You must have been camping according to one of the pictures. Noticed in the paper that Dad has been fishing. Nettie and Meta both write often and their letters together with your own are reread many times. Hope you received the two pictures I mailed in the last letter. I have others but am afraid to send them on account of being lost in the mail. It is now getting dark and a light rain is coming down on our anti water proof tent. Am mailing two pictures of the German plane I told you about.
Love, Byrl.
Western Union Telegram
Byrl Sylvester was wounded in back and thigh twelfth September not seriously is at present in French hospital at front and doing very well all possible care will be taken of him both by French and Red Cross authorities stop accept sincere sympathy and expression of pride in the way Sylvester had done his work.
Norton
Mr. Sylvester
Plainview, Minn.
My dear Sir:
Before reading further let me assure you that your son is O. K. He was wounded today while on duty at a poste de secor, his comande, Bob Hall, of Minneapolis, I regret to say, was killed outright. Your son has two wounds, one in leg and one in shoulder, and will probably be in the hospital not over three weeks. There is POSITIVELY no need for

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you to worry as to his speedy COMPLETE recovery. I am writing you as I am the son of J. G. Lawrence of Wabasha also V. P. of Brown & Bigelow St. Paul.
We have been on duty on a very hot sector near Verdun and the roads are shelled most of the time by the Germans. I need not say that all of the boys in S. S. U. 62 join me in expressing regrets over Byrl’s being wounded and we will look after him in every possible way. As the French say, "C’est la Guerre."
Your very truly,
C. W. Lawrence.

September 7, 1917- (Byrl’s letter)
"Our Men ‘Have it all over’ French Soldiers in Grenade Throwing" – Says Young
Sylvester
Recent letters from Byrl Sylvester from somewhere in France give a little more news from the front.
(NOTE: Letter written August 4 printed here)
Letter
Thursday, September 13, 1917
In France
Dear Folks,
Well you could never guess where I am writing this note. Am in a French Hospital back of the lines. Yesterday Bob Hall and myself went up to a dangerous post on duty. A shell came in. Poor Bob was taken away before my eyes. I have only two slight flesh wounds. One in the hip and one in my back. Nothing serious at all or I would have cabled. Will be moved to the American Hospital soon. Will be home sooner than expected.
Love, Byrl.

September 14, 1917- (Byrl’s letter)
Sees Boche Plane Destroyed in Air Battle
Byrl Sylvester Witnesses Thrilling Destruction by French Airmen and Secures
Many Pieces From Broken Machine as Souvenirs
War Reports on All Fronts Most Encouraging – He says
(NOTE: Letter written August 19 printed here.)
Copy of letter
Jubecourt, SS 62, Sept. 14th, 1917
Dear Mr. Norton,
Thank you so much for the telegram Mr. Harjes and you sent to me. I received it about five in the afternoon yesterday.
Robert P. Hall was killed on the 12th, about ten in the morning at the entrance of a Poste Decours in the Bois d’Avocourt. Byrl Sylvester who was on the car with him was just inside the abri and was only wounded. A brancardier ran to another Poste near by where an ambulance was stationed and almost at once were able to get Sylvester down to the hospital at Brocourt. Someone telephoned me from the Bois D’Avocourt and I was on the scene as soon as possible. We carried Sylvester on to a main hospital at Freides where the Doctors advised an immediate examination and operation. I remained with him all the time. Fortunately it is not serious. He is doing well and will be evacuated to Paris in a few days. Two pieces of shell, one in the leg and the other in the back, - no bones were touched and I suppose the Doctors consider them really only flesh wounds
I telephoned to Compiegne, according to the instructions received from you and also telegraphed to Paris that same day. During the night, this whole section of the country was terrifically bombed by German planes and they successfully cut all wires from everywhere. Communication was not restored until late that afternoon. I had the body of HALL brought down to a chapel at the Hospital at Brecourt and this morning he was buried in the cemetery adjoining. I found a French Pasteur who speaks perfect

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English and he read the service of the Church of England. Naturally, all the men appreciated very much having the service in English. I have all HALL’S personal belongings and will guard them until I hear from you. I did all that I could possibly do and trust it will be satisfactory to all. Some of the Section were naturally a little unstrung but the spirit is perfect and one and all assure me they are willing and have every intention of doing just the same as always. I really have a fine bunch of men and am certainly very thankful. I think I could take almost this entire section to Italy if there is a chance of a service being established there.
Sincerely yours,
Ronald Hoyt Pearce
Leaver of S. S. U. 62.
Letter from Red Cross

September 15, 1917
Dear Sir,
I was extremely sorry to have to cable you of the accident to your son, but more than glad to give you the assurance that his wounds are not permanently serious, and that he is as, from the last news, going on very well.
He was wounded at 11 o’clock in the morning while bringing French wounded back from one of the most dangerous and advanced posts in the Avocourt Wood, a name which is doubtless familiar to you from accounts of fighting in the neighborhood of Verdun. His companion Mr. Hall was killed by the same shell which wounded Sylvester. Your son was taken at once to a French hospital close by. I can assure you, from previous experience, that the French doctors take the best of care of any of our men who come into their hands. As soon, however, as your boy can be moved, he will be brought to Paris and put into the American Red Cross Hospital which is directed by Dr. Joseph BLAKE of New York. I need hardly say that anything we can do for your son will give us pleasure.
With true sympathy,
Believe me,
Very truly yours,
Richard Norton.
Post Card
Saturday, September 15, 1917
France
Dear Folks,
Just a few lines to let you know that am getting along fine here in the hospital. Am going to be transferred to the American Hospital in Paris as soon as can stand the trip. After all am very lucky.
Most sincerely, Byrl.
Letter
Tuesday, September 18, 1917
In a French Hospital
Dear Folks at home,
Am recovering fast now and the doctors promise to soon send me to our American hospital in Paris. Of course it is tough to have to lie in bed day after day but the hospital authorities and the ambulance men help things along a great deal. Most every American in this locality has called to see me. Have about a car load of magazines, cigarettes and candy. Frank Rafferty of Wabasha, who has been over here a short time with a bunch of railroad engineers, called Sunday to see me. It was quite a surprise. He had heard that I was "laid up" so he came over about twenty miles to see me. We had a great visit. My bed is number one near the door so that I get lots of air. There are thirty-eight Frenchmen in this ward, all being brought in the same day. Am

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beginning to learn quite a little French now. These old boys are a jolly bunch in spite of their ills. The food is good, but it will be better in the American Hospital. My first day here the commanding officers of this whole division and staff came in to see me. They seemed to make quite a lot of unnecessary fuss about it all – so that now it seems I am a privileged case around here.
If I remember right this is Fair week at home. Suppose the usual crowds will be on hand. Is Edwin Jr. getting a good start on his school work? There is no need to worry now. I will soon be well and better than ever. I will be home before Christmas and everything will come out fine. Send my mail to Credit Lyonnais, Paris.
Love, Byrl.
PLEASE DO NOT PUBLISH IN PAPER
DO NOT PUBLISH
Letter
Wednesday, September 19, 1917
Dear Folks,
Well I certainly do feel fine this evening. A short time ago the high officer of this division together with our lieutenant and our section leader called. It was a big surprise. The chief of our division presented me with a Croix de Guerre or French War Cross. He went through a solemn ceremony saying it was given to me for working hard and being brave in a dangerous sector. I feel mighty good in receiving this medal. In fact any person should, but more especially an American. When coming over here a medal was about the last thin I thought of receiving. Am going to be moved into Paris tomorrow or the next day, and I will soon be on my two feet again and getting fat. We just received the news that Foley and "Fudge" Wyman were on their way over. I may get a chance to see them while in Paris. Four U. S Engineers called today to see me. We had a fine visit. Within a few days this French hospital will be taken over by an American hospital staff for it looks as though our men are going into service in this division.
I have just received your letter telling me about Edwin visiting Meta. Notice by the NEWS that the crops are fine and that everyone is ready for the big Fair. What’s the matter with a lot of those who were drafted? Your magazines and also Nettie’s have arrived at just the right time. Thanks. It would be a good idea, I think, to keep this quiet about the medal. Let it be found out through some other way. Also do not have these letters printed in the paper. As I mentioned in my last letter. Do not worry. "All is fine."
Love, Byrl.

September 21, 1917- Byrl Sylvester is Wounded by Busting Shell
Cablegram Received Here Last Thursday Brings Shocking News to Parents
Young Man’s Companion is Killed by Same Shell
The entire community was severely shocked last Friday morning when news was received that Byrl E. Sylvester, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, had been badly injured at the front somewhere in France.
The news of his injury was contained in the following cable gram received by his parents.
"B. E. Sylvester was wounded in the back and thighs at front September 12. Not seriously. All possible care will be taken of him by his friends and the Red Cross. Except sincere sympathy and expression of pride in the way Sylvester has done his work. Norton."
His companion, Robert Hall, a former Minnesota University student, was killed by the same shell that wounded Byrl, while driving their ambulance on the French war front. The shell burst directly over the ambulance they were driving. Both were members of the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps and entered the service on April 24.
While the sad news has caused many to shudder over the awful fatalities of war, all are pleased to learn that his injuries are not serious and pray that he may return

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home safe and sound. Incidents like this are what bring home the reality of war and it may not be many months before other homes will share in the anxiety of these parents and friends.
Since Byrl has been in France, he has sent home many interesting letters describing the scenes at the fighting front as he has viewed them while serving in the lines and each letter has been anxiously read by his friends and especially the boys in the training camps.
Below we publish a very interesting letter received since the accident but written some time before.
(NOTE: Letter written August 24 printed here.)
It will be noted that while mail has been sent to him regularly from home it is a long time reaching him. He had just received the draft list published nearly two months ago and is not aware that many of the drafted boys have enlisted and are not in the service. The box of cigars alluded to were mailed from Rochester over two months ago and had but recently reached him. Regardless of these trying conditions he has been faithful and has sent home letters every week.
We know that the sympathy of everyone in this community goes out to Byrl and all will anxiously await to learn of his recovery.

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Mr. and Mrs. Claud Cray attended the Christian Church Convention at Rochester Tuesday evening.
Letter
Saturday, September 22, 1917
"A French Hospital"
Dear Folks,
Ten days have passed now since I arrived here and am going to be moved into Paris tomorrow FOR SURE. The last few days here have certainly dragged along. This is the longest that I ever stayed in bed at one clip in my life. Three days ago a new bunch of engineers, who are camped a few miles from here started coming over here to see me. About twenty have called already, and of all the stuff they bring over. It sure is a grand sight to see those great big fellows coming in there bringing bread, jam, eggs, chocolate, plums, smokes, and even cucumbers. Just this morning three came in bringing cherry pie which they got some place. These fellows are real men, from all parts of the States and are here for business. For several days I had two nurses on my trail – one French and the other English. The French nurse left yesterday. She came in to say good bye and gave me a package of cigarettes. Pretty fine of the old girl.
One of the cars brought your cable over the other night about ten. I had planned to cable myself – but the office evidently beat me to it and fired it over. Have been reading in the home paper about the County Fair. Was it a big success as usual? Plainview must certainly be a dead old place with all the young bunch away. The boys are certainly scattered now. Maybe some will be able to get home for Christmas. Well the doc is hanging a needle to shoot some stuff in me.
Love, Byrl.
DO NOT PUBLISH
Will write as soon as I arrive in Paris.
Letter

September 26, 1917
Paris – American Hospital
Dear Folks,
Here I am all nicely located in the American Hospital in Paris. Just arrived yesterday. Was very lucky to be brought in by a couple of our officers who were touring the Front. A nice big roomy car. We passed through some very interesting country and

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The fresh air certainly did feel good after being two weeks in bed. But then am back in bed now. The place is a very nice one to stay in. The doctors have given me a fine private room and I have three other ambulance men as companions. We visit and the time will pass very fast. After being brought in I was given a hot bath, the first one for many days shall I say, its weeks! I might admit it. After living in dirt, to be clean is a wonderful feeling. The food here is very good. Am eating like a horse and guess it won’t hurt me. This month of September has been very beautiful over here – nice cool days. The best month so far. My order is going in from the office for a new uniform as my old one is a wreck. My helmet has been brought in and notice quite a dent in the front of it. Luckily it was where it could be, but it’s no use to think about what might have happened. From present indications I may sail about the first of November. At any rate, the Thanksgiving turkey at home is liable to suffer because of my presence around the festive board. Your magazines are coming now.
One of the men here sails tomorrow. He will carry this with him and mail in N. Y. You ought to receive it quick.
Love, Byrl.
% Credit Lyonnais, Paris
DO NOT PUBLISH
Letter

October 3, 1917
Blake Hospital Paris
Dear Nettie,
This is a strange place to be in I will admit. But such is fate. After all it turned out very lucky. The man with me twenty feet away was killed outright. I got just a couple of small shell wounds. One in the back, the other in the hip. No bones were inured and they got me on the table in short order and removed the pieces. After staying at the Front hospital for two weeks, have been removed here – a very fine place. In two more weeks will be out. It will take a couple of months away for me to reenter some branch of the service so am coming home. The war will last at least until next fall, so it looks like all the boys will be there. Your fine box of smokes just received also your letters. Thanks sis. Very nice of you. One of the men will mail this in old N. Y.
Most sincerely, Byrl.
Letter

October 3, 1917
Blake Hospital Paris
Dear Folks,
One week has passed since I arrived here and am able to hobble around on crutches a little bit, which helps some. My back wound is all well and my hip is getting along fine. The wound will soon close then it will require only about a week more here. I ought to be out of the hospital around the 15th. My hip may be a little stiff for some time but as no bones were injured, it will come out all right.
The last two days have been lucky for me. Received your fine boots, the socks and candy. Nettie also sent smokes. Also received your magazines and the NEWS. The fair must be all over with and everyone busy. From all the dope now I expect to SAIL for home about the first of November. Since the trouble, the office is anxious to help so that it means my departure for home is sooner than I had expected. The boats last Saturday did not sail. I wrote a letter to go on last weeks boat. Three men are sailing this Saturday so I will have this one mailed in N. Y. by them.
The "Boche" continue to bomb London every night. Things are at a dead lock on this Front. Our men are arriving every week now. Please do not publish this letter.
Love, Byrl.
Letter

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From E. L. Sylvester to Nettie, Phaon, and Phaon Jr.
I am sending you a copy of the letter we just received from France. We had a short letter yesterday from Wyman Lawrence, telling a little about it, but did not explain much. We just received in today’s mail at same time as these copies, a letter written by Byrl dated Sept. 6, 1917. He is telling of receiving letters from you, the smokes sent him in August, and pictures we sent him. Also telling of going back to front work again. He also sent two little pictures of the German plane of August 23 which he saw fall. We think he is now at Paris, that he will visit London and then come home before Christmas.
With love to you all,
E. L. Sylvester.

October 5, 1917- No Word Received From Wounded Boy in France.
Although it is four weeks since Byrl Sylvester was injured at the front in France no word has come from there in regard to his condition. Not only his parents but his many friends anxiously await more news of his condition and hope for his complete recovery and that he will soon be returning home.

October 12, 1917- Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and J. D. Bateman left for Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day with friends.

October 19, 1917- (Byrl’s Letters)
Plainview Boy Wounded on Battlefield Receives French War Cross.
Byrl Sylvester, Now in French Hospital, Honored for Brave and Hard Work With
Ambulance Corps – to Soon Return Home
Interesting Letters Tell of His Varied Experiences
The following extracts from letters just received from Byrl Sylvester, by his parents, will be read with deep interest by his many friends, and especially the boys at the training camps.
(NOTE: Letters written September 13, 15, 18, 19, 22, are printed here.)
Encouraging News from War Front by Local Resident
The following letters have just been received by E. L. Sylvester, concerning the injury his son, Byrl E. Sylvester, met with while at the front in France with the Red Cross Ambulance Corps. They are of particular interest to the people of this community where Byrl is so well and favorably known.
(NOTE: Letter from C. W. Lawrence, Richard Norton, and Ronald Hoytpearce printed here.)
Byrl Sylvester, now in French hospital honored for brave and hard work with ambulance corps to soon to return home. Letters.

October 26, 1917- Loyalty meeting at G. A. R. Hall. The meeting was called to order by chairman G. F. Sylvester and opened with the singing of the Star Spangled Banner lead by the H. S. Glee Club.
Sylvester letter – Plainview boy plans to return home soon.

November 2, 1917- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester received a telegram Wednesday noon announcing that their son, Byrl, had landed in New York and that he would soon be on his way home.
Byrl was wounded in France several weeks ago by an exploding German shell that took the life of his companion, Robert Hall of Minneapolis. His parents plan to meet him at Minneapolis and accompany him on the last end of his journey.
The letters that have furnished such splendid descriptions to our readers will be missed, but all will rejoice at his return and hope that his injuries are such that he will suffer no permanent results.
After nearly 5 months as a volunteer in the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, a portion of that time on one of the hottest battlefields at the front, he has gone through an

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experience of a lifetime. He offered his services without compensation or hopes of attaining favor or reward, but for the good he might do, and he richly deserves all honor and credit that can be bestowed upon him.
He describes his wounds as slight, but he remained in the field hospital several weeks before being removed to the American hospital in Paris, where he was again compelled to take to bed. That his wounds were received while on a daring duty and was connected with other valued service to the armies of France was indicated when he was presented with the French War Cross for valor, an honor given but for Americans. It is expected that he will reach home today or Saturday and he will receive a welcome from his many friends that is real.
Misses Imogene Lutz, Esther Brooks, accompanied by Katherine Sylvester and Elizabeth Mack left for Minneapolis Wednesday afternoon to attend the State Educational meeting and spend a few days with friends.

November 9, 1917-
Plainview Boy, War Hero, Home with Croix De Guerre on Breast
Byrl Sylvester, Wounded while with Ambulance Corps, Home Again – Wears
War Cross, Frances’ Highest Award
Byrl Sylvester, Plainview’s famous soldier of fortune, is back home again. Wearing a uniform of the soldier of France, his left breast carrying the much honored French War Cross, a livid scar on his body, received when wounded in one of the battles at the front, and aside from a slight limp, the picture of health arrived in Plainview last Saturday night at 10 o’clock and was greeted with a hearty welcome by the entire populace of his home city.
As the train pulled into the station the Plainview band rendered patriotic airs, while the throng of people surged forward to grasp his hand or even gain a glimpse of his familiar countenance. Immediately he stepped from the train he was raised on the shoulders of huskie friends and carried the length of the long platform, through the throng, waving and greeting and grasping for many hands, to an awaiting auto, appropriately decorated and escorted to his home.
More than 5 months ago he left home. He was clerk in his father’s bank, but he could not resist the call when our country’s honor was at stake in which the principal of justice was involved.
If ever a home boy received a welcome that came from the hearts of the people, Byrl realized that he had received it to the full extent and he thoroughly appreciated it, more than mere words could express. It was indeed a time when home coming meant more than it ever had in his existence.
Every citizen was proved to welcome him, not alone for the valor he has shown but for the real pleasure of welcoming his safe return from a most perilous experience. That all our sons may return as safe is the prayer of every loyal heart.
He went on May 14th to Minneapolis to join the Norton-Harjes ambulance corps and shortly after sailed for France. And for four long months he has gone through battles about which historians of tomorrow will be writing. He came back with the Croix de Guerre pinned on his uniform, France’s highest award.
A short time ago the young man, who voluntarily enlisted for service for his country last spring, was honorably discharged from the American hospital in Paris where he had lain for weeks convalescing from wounds received when he was struck by fragments of a bursting German shell while on duty.
The trip home was a long, tiresome one and it was a great relief to once more enter his own home to enjoy the real comforts of life. After a complete rest he has again taken his position in the Plainview State Bank and during his spare moments is kept busy among his friends describing his experiences and giving details of the war in France.

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Statements he has given out are indeed interesting and furnishes a clearer view of many of the needs of American Assistance.
"The German Prisoners cannot be made to believe that any Americans have yet reached France. Most of them are glad enough to be taken prisoners because the Allies treat them so well."
"Fighting on the west front seems a hopeless deadlock. All France is praying that the Sammies will turn the fighting conclusively in favor to the Allies. They were indeed jubilant when the U. S. entered the War.
"The spirit exhibited by the French is certainly wonderful. When one sees men from 50 to 55 years of age, willingly risk their lives as stretcher bearers and enduring all sorts of privations with a smile it makes him want to pitch right in and help.
"Ambulance work is not the mere work of driving a car to transport the wounded soldiers from one hospital to the other. A driver who is detailed to work near the front lines gets all the excitement he cares for.
He has brought home a number of relics, among which is a watch-shaped cigarette lighter made for him by a French soldier out of pieces of bullets, shell and German belt buckles. The two sides are formed by the buckles. He says that each German soldier wears such a buckle on his belt with the words "Gott mit uns" inscribed over the Prussian eagle. A circular portion of a 48-centimeter French shell casing serves to join the sides. The receptacle is filed with oil and is a feeder for a wick, which is protected when not in use by a hollowed steel nose bullet. The flint lighter is the only part of the relic not picked up on the battle field. He has a number of other relics quite as interesting.
On his return to Minneapolis it became his duty to return to the mother of his companion, Mrs. Hall, a collection of which the young man had started to save while in Europe, and a package containing a "Croix de Guerre," which had been valiantly earned by the young man. The performance of his duty and the telling the mother of the incident that caused the death of her son was one of the hardest duties he has yet performed.
Program at Congregational Church November 11 – 7:30-
Altos – Marion Sylvester.
Following the concert the choir will be entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. This is the second of a number of delightful affairs to be given the choir this season and are much anticipated after weeks of rehearsals.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Saturday afternoon for Owatonna to meet their son Byrl, who has just returned from France. He arrived St. Paul Saturday morning and immediately started for home.
E. L. Sylvester, E. G. Krause, W. C. Allen and Louis Risley left Tuesday afternoon for the northern part of the state to spend several days enjoying the big game season. They expect to visit various points and then prepare their camp for the season.

November 16, 1917- The Civic League will hold a meeting in the opera house on Wednesday evening, November 21, at which time a musical program will be given and Byrl Sylvester will relate his experiences while in France. A small admission fee will be charged to assist in paying for the yarn the ladies are using to make sets for our boys in the Navy.
Gathering at Wabasha last Saturday 400-500 present.
"He was followed by Byrl Sylvester, of this city, who recently returned from France, where he has been in the ambulance service for the past five months. In a pleasing manner Byrl gave a graphic description of his experiences beginning with his trip over the very seat of action. How it feels to be under heavy shell fire was pictured most vividly. He spoke of the differences between the treatment of the prisoners taken by the French and those taken by the Germans. The bombing of the French hospitals

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was described. And he told of witnessing a thrilling battle between a French aviator and the enemy in which the Frenchman brought down the Boche. He told of the splendid treatment accorded him in the hospital and the interest manifest by many Americans who called on him during his period in the hospital, of meeting Frank Rafferty, a Wabasha boy, and the splendid visit he had with him. He was greeted with a round of applause that showed appreciation…
Byrl Sylvester gave a talk on his experiences in France at St. Charles Monday evening and again at Lewiston on Tuesday evening. Between his work in the bank and the demands on him to assist at Loyalty Meetings his time has been pretty well taken up.
While at Lewiston, Tuesday evening, Byrl Sylvester accepted an invitation to give a talk at Winona. He gave an informal talk to the young men at 6 o’clock and the same evening spoke at the armory under the auspices of the Home Guard Association. Byrl is without doubt, the most sought after man in this part of the state, and he has a long chain of speaking engagements.
Byrl Sylvester and mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, were entertained at a seven o’clock dinner at the home of Dr. H. H. Witherstine, in Rochester, Wednesday evening. The occasion being in honor of Mr. Sylvester and covers were laid for twenty-eight. After dinner Mr. Sylvester related some of his experiences in France while at the front and on the firing line.

November 23, 1917- (Picture of Byrl)
The above likeness of Byrl E. Sylvester, is the first picture showing him in full uniform, since his return from France. It is a splendid likeness and will be of interest to all who have read his experiences while in the service with the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps.
While the experiences Byrl has seen and gone through would satisfy the ardor of most anyone, he is still willing and anxious to serve his country in the present great strife and now the aviation field appeals greatest to him. While in Minneapolis last week he made application, took the severe examination and has been accepted in the Naval Aviation Corps.
He will enter the Naval Aviation Corps, learning to pilot hydroplanes on land and sea, and will enter the Dunnwoody Institute at Minneapolis on December 1st, where he will take a three month course. He was one of two out of a squad of forty, who passed the examination. There will be a class of but 25 in the school during this next period.
Packed House Greets Civic League Benefit
Fine Entertainment Wednesday Night sets Pact for Attendance
The excellent program given at the Opera House Wednesday evening, under the auspices of the Civic League, pleased and delighted the largest audience that was ever packed into the local Opera house.
Every available corner and place that a chair could be placed or a person could stand was occupied. Children filled the piano corner, the dressing rooms, the side wings, in the entry and even out into the street the throng stood waiting to hear Byrl Sylvester relate his experiences and even get a glimpse of him.
C. D. Burchard acting as chairman first called on Rev. J. L. Jones, who gave the invocation. The Plainview Band then rendered the National anthem, while the audience stood with bowed heads.
Senator James A. Carley was then called upon and tho he has spoken before local audiences many times recently, he was ready with a message new and full of life, of patriotism pertaining to the present war and the various movements that are now being pushed to aid the work. He was heartily cheered throughout his remarks and especially when he paid a fitting tribute to our hero did the audience burst forth in one hearty cheer. His censor of those of good circumstanced, who have failed or refused to do their bit, was indeed most fitting and expressed a sentiment shared in by all.

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He was followed by a violin and clarinet duet by the Messes Vera and Leona Dickman (NOTE: neighbors and close friends of the Sylvesters.) accompanied by Mrs. Arthur Koenig. A male quartet composed of Messrs. Rohweder, Bolton, Vermilya and Slocumb rendered a very pleasing selection. Mrs. W. Woodcock rendered a solo in her usual pleasing manner that delighted all.
The treat of the evening, which all had looked forward to was when in a few fitting remarks the chairman called on Byrl E. Sylvester to relate his experiences while in the Ambulance Service in France. As he arose he was greeted with the loudest applause of the evening and the whole audience arose in one mass. For a moment he was dazed but soon collected himself and gave a splendid description of experiences and events, from the time he left New York harbor, during his training, service at the front, in the hospitals, until his return to the States and home. During his talk he showed a number of relics obtained in the field, among which were parts of a German Aeroplane. He exhibited a gas mask, showed how it was worn and explained its construction, and also showed the steel helmet he wore while in the service. In concluding he referred to his return home, of the crowd congregated at the depot with the band and a lump in his throat that for a time made him speechless. After taking his seat at the rear of the stage he was presented with a beautiful bouquet of cut flowers by Miriam Rohweder.
A ladies quartet, composed of Mesdames Woodcock, Young, LaCraft and Miss Petterson, rendered a beautiful song. Miss Lutz followed with a reading from Kipling that captivated the audience.
The meeting was closed with a benediction by Mr. H. J. Hill and a selection by the band.
It proved one of the most successful and pleasing gathering that has yet been held in Plainview. Though an admission of but 10 cents was charged to aid in buying yarn for the ladies work, over $50.00 was realized. At the close many remained to inspect Mr. Sylvester’s souvenirs and to greet him once more.
(NOTE: The following is the "Note Card" that Byrl used when giving his speeches. It was typed.)
1. Trip over
a. Leaving N.Y.
b. Submarine preparation
c. Learning to speak French
d. Arrival at Bordeaux
2. Arrival in Paris
3. Sandricourt
4. Dijon
5. Leaving for the Front
a. War Zone
b. People at work
c. Trucks in Transport
6. Arrival at Front
a. Base Hospitals
7. First Shell fire
8. Trip up to Front Posts
9. Gas Shells
10. Abris
11. German Prisoners
12. French Hospital
a. Care
b. Bombing
13. Paris Hospital

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14. Trip Home
a. First glimpse of N. Y.
b. Home

(NOTE: The following are newspaper clippings from area newspapers with no dates. They have been placed here for lack of a better placing.)
Winona Republican Herald
Byrl Sylvester Carries War Message to Winonans at Great Armory Meeting
Plainview Aviation Recruit and Ambulance Service Veteran Says Air Forces of
U. S. Will Turn Battle Tide
Byrl Sylvester, Plainview’s Soldier of fortune, late member of an American ambulance corps on duty "Somewhere in France" and wearer of the French war cross for valor, gave Winonans a vivid description of the war at the Armory last night.
The young soldier, who, although wounded by a German shell while in the ambulance service, is son to return to the front as an American … (missing piece) … the war. He said he believed that in the coming Spring campaign, when the massed armies of the Allies are to be thrown against the Germans, that the American aviator would turn the tide of the war.
He believed that with the great aerial attacks that are sure to come behind the Hun line and upon interior German territory, the followers of the Kaiser will realize their cause is a hopeless one.
The speaker told of his departure from this country and he related the many preparations that were made aboard ships for under sea attacks, telling how everyone was instructed to act when the signal was given them to seek safety in the life boats. He then told of the arrival of his company in France and the hardening process which all American soldiers undergo before being sent to the trenches. He said he never would forget the first time he was sent under fire, when he could hear the purr of the death bringer many seconds before it passed him and then bursting of the shell about two blocks distant. In a modes manner, he related the story about the bursting of the shell that took his companions life and wounded him.
Bomb Hospital
Instances of the terrible atrocities committed by the Germans were cited by Mr. Sylvester. He said, during the time he was in a French hospital, German aviators stormed it eight out of fourteen nights, tearing down and blowing up building within a hundred yards from where he was lying helpless. Then he spoke of the way in which prisoners taken by the Germans were treated. He said the wounds of the injured are not taken care of for days and many thousands of the allied prisoners die from blood poison and exposure. The wounded men that come out whole when taken prisoner by the Germans, according to the speaker, do so because they have a great deal of endurance and because they won’t give up. But, on the other hand, he said the prisoners taken by the allies are treated as well as the wounded allied soldiers.
Most of the casualties in the Verdun fighting that Mr. Sylvester came in contact with, he said, were the result of poisonous gases. After the French had driven the Huns out of trenches they had occupied from the beginning of the war, many pianos were found in them. Many of the prisoners that were taken at this time he said, appeared to be about fourteen to fifteen years old, although they firmly asserted that they were eighteen years of age. Upon acquainting them with the fact that the American nation was now in the war, said the young soldier, they grew furious and said it was untrue and they also said it was impossible for the Americans to travel across the ocean on account of the German submarines.
Dr. Devitt Talks…
Rochester Daily Bulletin

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Sylvester has Big Audience at St. Charles
Byrl Sylvester, Plainview young man who recently returned from Verdun battle front, where he was wounded, was the principal speaker at a mass meeting in St. Charles last evening, the purpose of which was to add impetus to the YMCA war fund campaign.
In Verdun Sector.
In his talk, Mr. Sylvester described his experiences in the early part of June on arrival in France, his preparation for the ambulance service, his various assignments in the Verdun sector, his impressions while under shell-fire, his treatment after being wounded, his presence in a base hospital which was bombed on eight evenings during two weeks, his final transfer to Paris, and the delight with which he set foot again on American soil. Throughout his talk he made frequent and commendatory reference to the work of the YMCA. Mr. Sylvester is practically recovered from his wound in the thigh and in the shoulder, although he still uses a cane.
At Lewiston Tonight
He will speak again at the Lewiston meeting in this county, tonight. He states that his only object in these meetings is for the benefit of the boys at the front who he knows will later profit by the funds which are secured as a result of such programs.

Rochester Daily Bulletin
Sylvester in City; Will Give Address Here Soon
Byrl Sylvester, Plainview young man who was wounded on the French battle front in September and who returned only recently, has been asked to speak in Rochester on the evening of Wednesday November 23. Sylvester, who is known to many in Rochester, is in the city today as the guest of Glenn Witherstine. He speaks in Winona Tuesday Nov. 22, and it is probable that he can come to this city the following day.
Ever since returning from the Verdun front, where he was an ambulance driver, Sylvester has been in great demand in the southern part of the state. Dozens of communities have asked him to give an account of his experiences and for the past week he has been speaking almost continually. This week he has spoken to large audiences at St. Charles and Lewiston.
Mr. Sylvester was greeted enthusiastically by his many friends in the city upon his arrival here this afternoon. This evening he will be the honored guest at a formal dinner party to be given by Glenn Witherstine.
Later in the evening Sylvester will be honored at a formal dancing party given by Miss Ione Van Dusen at her home on East Fifth Street.

Unknown Source
Sylvester Limping from Wounds, Wearing French War Cross, Arrives at
Plainview
Limping slightly from the wounds received while driving an ambulance on the Verdun battlefields, and wearing the French war cross as a mark of bravery, Byrl Sylvester reached his home in Plainview last Saturday evening. Sylvester, who is well known in Rochester, is looking fine and intends to return to the war zone as soon as he has sufficiently recovered from his injuries.
Before going to his home in Plainview, Sylvester stopped at Minneapolis where to the family circle of Robert Hall, his college chum and comrade in arms, he told the story of Hall’s tragic yet glorious death. Sylvester was wounded by the same shell that killed Hall on the battlefield of Verdun.
There was a catch in his voice and tears in his eyes as he told the parents of the



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manner of their son’s death when he was struck by a shell fragment just as they backed an ambulance of the Norton-Harjes corps up to the abris in the communicating trenches to receive the load of French wounded and dying.

Awarded Cross of Valor
And when he was through and the last hushed query had been put by the dead ambulance driver’s parents, Sylvester drew from his pocket a little packet which he had carefully guarded on his voyage across the sea.
Hall’s mother opened it tenderly and with mingled tears of sorrow and joy drew forth a glittering Croix de Guerre conferred by the French government on her boy for valor.

Had Started Collection
There were other little souvenirs in the package, the beginning of a collection which young Hill started when he first went to Europe, and which he had hoped to bring back with him after the war to show to his friends.
All forenoon, Sylvester spent at the Hall home he told of the many incidents and experiences which he, Robert and other ambulance drivers of the Norton-Harjes corps had met in France.

Former University Men
Then he took his leave to visit the campus of the University of Minnesota, where he was a student before going to France.
To his friends who met him there and at the Delta Kappa Epsilon house, of which fraternity he is a member, he declared his intention of going back to France as an aviator as soon as the wounds he received permit him. The shell which killed young Hall and wounded him, he said, was fired by the Germans in their recent heavy counter-assaults.

Shell Hit Hall’s Head
It was scarcely daylight and the fighting of the day had not yet begun in earnest. The German Batteries had been silent all night, and when they started firing the first shell struck directly in the abris.
Hall fell dead with a fragment of the shell lodged in his skull. The ambulance was demolished and Sylvester, who was close by, fell wounded in many places – hip, back, and leg. Many of the blesses also were killed.
Sylvester limps from his wounds and has to carry a cane, but he is proud of the Croix de Guerre which was pinned on his breast for valor. Although the entire division was cited for the decoration, he was personally honored.
Sylvester was in a French hospital until about a month ago, when he started his return trip.

Fighting at a Deadlock
"The fighting on the west front is a hopeless deadlock" he declared. "All France is praying that America will turn the fighting conclusively in the favor of the Allies. They were jubilant when America entered the war.
"The spirit of the French is a wonderful thing. When one sees men 50 and 55 years old, willing risking their lives as stretcher bearers and enduring all sorts of privations with a smile, and when one catches the "heads up" spirit of the poilus in the trenches, it makes him want to pitch in and help them.

Ambulance Work Exciting
"The French morale is performing no small service for the Allies.
Asked whether ambulance driving is a thrilling occupation, he said, "Many people have the impression that driving an ambulance is merely transporting wounded soldiers from one hospital to another. A driver who is detailed to work near the front line trenches, as we were, gets excitement enough."
He has a souvenir of his service, a watch-shaped cigarette lighter, made for him

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by a French soldier out of pieces of bullets, shells and German belt buckles.

Battlefield Souvenir
The two sides are formed by the buckles. Every German, he said, wears such a buckle on his belt with the words, "Gott Mit Uns" inscribed over the Prussian eagle. A circular portion of a 48 centimeter French shell casing serves to join the buckle sides.
This receptacle is filled with oil and is a feeder for a wick, which is protected when not in use by a hollowed steel nose of a rifle bullet. The flint lighter is the only part of the piece which was not picked up on the battlefield.
"The German prisoners cannot be made to believe that any Americans have yet reached France. Most of them are glad enough to be taken prisoners because the Allies treat them so well," Mr. Sylvester said.

Winona Independent

… The speaker expressed the belief that if aeroplanes were properly manned and in sufficient numbers internal Germany could be rocked by suffering and be made to know the terrors of militarism fostered by their monarchal government.
Night of Attack
"On the night before I left the hospital in France," Sylvester said, "the enemy aeroplane warning was sounded, the hospital lights were put out and all the hospital attendants pushed to the dugout. We were left helpless on our cots in the dark. The roar of the machine grew louder and finally the sound died out. The hospital attendants returned and the lights were turned on. But a few minutes later the (NOTE: the rest was torn away.)

November 30, 1917- Picture of Plainview Municipal Band with G. F. Sylvester.
E. G. Krause, E. L. Sylvester, Ralph Risley, who have been enjoying several days in the northern woods in search of big game returned home last Thursday night. They secured their full quota and each brought back a fine deer. They say even fishing is good in that section at this time of the year.
Byrl Sylvester left for Chatfield, Monday afternoon to fill an engagement he has promised some time ago. He says this is possibly the last one as he desired to use the few remaining days to visit among his friends, before departing for Minneapolis to take up his new work.

December 7, 1917- Byrl Sylvester left for Minneapolis to enter upon his studies in the aviation school, where he will spend the next 3 months. He expects to be back in France again next spring.

December 14, 1917- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Miss Petterson spent Saturday with friends.

December 21, 1917- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Eyota Saturday where she met her daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. who will spend the holiday season here.
Mr. Sylvester and Mr. Rohweder visited the cooking class Thursday and plan a way of heating the H. S. Laboratory. –School News.

December 28, 1917- The Plainview Travelers are already preparing a service Flag to be hung in the City Hall. This is indeed a splendid patriotic act and will certainly be highly prized and appreciated.
The Plainview State Bank is one of the first business institutions to display a service flag in their window.
Byrl Sylvester, who is studying in the aviation branch in the Dunwoody Institute at Minneapolis came home Saturday on a weeks furlough to enjoy the holidays. Byrl is looking fine and his friends are indeed pleased to greet him.

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=== [ 1918 ] ===

January 4, 1918- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday afternoon on a short visit returning Thursday.
Byrl Sylvester left for Winona Friday to attend a party given by a company of friends.
Byrl Sylvester, who has been enjoying several days furlough at home, departed Monday morning for Minneapolis to resume his studies. The best wishes of a host of friends go with him in his new field of labor.

January 11, 1918- G. F. Sylvester was reelected Supt. of the Sunday School. (NOTE: Congregational Church.)
Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of Marble arrived Friday afternoon on a few days visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

January 18, 1918- Dr. J. P. Caldwell, who has been visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester for a few days, departed for his home at Marble Saturday. Mrs. Caldwell will remain for a longer visit.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Rochester Thursday afternoon on a short visit.

January 25, 1918- Mrs. J. P. Calwell Jr. sang two sacred solos at the Union Service held in the Christian Church Sunday evening. The audience was large and attentive.

February 8, 1918- Travelers in Opera House February 11.
The 16th Annual Banquet of the Travelers Club was celebrated Monday evening February by 43 members and 30 invited guests in the library…
From 7 – 7:30 o’clock a social time was enjoyed at the Opera House which had been tastefully decorated with flags and bunting and ferns with a large picture of Lincoln at the right of the stage. …Play "Somewhere in France"
Tableaux – "Spirit of Democracy" England – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
The Travelers take this means of thanks for all who responded so generously toward the fund to be given to the YMCA and to all those who took a part to help make the evening a splendid success.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and little son, who have been spending a few weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, departed for her home at Colraine Friday. She was accompanied to Minneapolis by her mother and together they will spend a few days with Byrl Sylvester.

February 15, 1918- (Writeup on banquet of Travelers by 43 members and 30 invited guests.)

February 22, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Schwanbeck, and Mrs. Geo. Black left Tuesday morning on a trip to So. Texas to enjoy a few days of the balmy southern climate and to inspect the much talked about country.
Play by Philomathean Literary Society Wednesday February 16 at 8 o’clock.
"Over Here".
Beryle Wallace – Marion Sylvester.

March 1, 1918- Old Settlers Meeting. Secretary – E. L. Sylvester.

March 8, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Schwanbeck, and Mrs. George Black returned last Thursday from their trip to Texas. They have had a very enjoyable trip but are not overly enthusiastic over the Rio Grande country. It was uncomfortably warm while there.

March 15, 1918- H. S. Glee Clubs – Opera House Friday March 22 "A Nautical Knot."
Park Sylvester wishes to thank the Civic League for the beautiful sweater and socks sent by the ladies to Camp Dodge. Park was in the latest draft and met the other boys from Plainview at the camp.
The Plainview Banks were nearly swamped for Thrift and War Savings Stamps

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Tuesday by pupils from the rural schools of the townships. The good work of organizing war savings societies is having a good effect.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Wednesday for Rochester on a visit to friends.
Florence Fricke, Katherine Sylvester, Marguerite Riley, Helen Austin accompanied by Miss Peterson attended the Chatfield – Plainview game Friday.

March 29, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Winona Tuesday morning to drive home their car which they have had there for repainting and varnishing during the winter.

April 5, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Wabasha Friday afternoon where they met their son Byrl of Minneapolis who came home on a short furlough returning Sunday afternoon. In company with about 25 he expects to soon be moved to another training camp.
Myron Smith has disposed of his residence property on Broadway to E. L. Sylvester. We understand the property will be used as a parsonage for the Church of Christ. This is a neat little property and its convenience to the church make it very desirable.
Dr. E. E. Smith, E. L. Sylvester, Dr. T. J. Moore, Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, H. D. Smith, C. L. Waterman, and W. G. Mack drove to Winona last Thursday where they attended the Scottish Rite meeting and banquet.

April 11, 1918 Chicago
Dear Folks,
Arrived in here on time. Leaving over Mich.-C. Everything going fine. Rolled in at 11:00 last night.
Love, Byrl.
Postcard

April 11, 1918 Detroit, 7:00
Dear Mother,
Everything fine. Red Cross here gave us all a dandy lunch. They are wide awake here.
Most sincerely, Byrl.

April 12, 1918- E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin, drove to Minneapolis last Thursday afternoon on a short visit to his son, Byrl. They were accompanied by Mrs. E. W. Finch and son Francis, who spend a few days with friends in the City.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester drove to Wabasha Wednesday evening to bid their son, Byrl, goodbye. With 25 others he passed through that city at 9:20 on his way to the Massachusetts school of Technic at Boston.
Postcard

April 12, 1918 Boston
Dear Folks,
Just arrived in a big snow storm. All fine.
Byrl.
Letter
Sunday April 14, 1918
Dear Folks,
My first week out here has gone by and it has been a might busy one. We have taken 9 exams in all and we have 3 more to take. We all passed the most important subjects. In two or three minor ones we did not receive enough at Dunwoody so they may hold us here a week longer, but we got a report last night that we were booked to leave for Pensacola, Florida next Saturday.
Tuesday morning we took our physical exams. It was a severe test. One of our men will have to stay behind and go to the hospital for an operation. He was over looked by the Minneapolis doctors.

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We were ordered over to the tailors for our new flying uniforms and we ought to have them within the next few days. We have Saturday afternoon and Sunday off here. Today some five people out in Winchester have invited Dave and myself out. Some people Dave knows in Minneapolis wired back here. The man is the Hudson car dealer here, so if things go right we may get a few auto rides. He also has a daughter. Have not had a chance to see Tom or John Hardtke and I could not get through the train to see the Askews that night. I looked for them in Chicago but did not see them. The people here are very nice. We like to hear them talk. Our quarters are right on the Charles River over looking Old South Church where Paul Revere looked and saw the two lanterns and the minute men fired the shot heard around the world. We may get a chance to see this stuff before we leave here.
The uniforms are copied after the English make and are very snappy looking. Our pay has increased to 63 per month now and we receive 40 meals which makes 103 in all. But you have to watch it pretty close to stay within the 40. They issue meal tickets to us. Food is certainly high. Our uniform, shoes, caps, etc will come to quite a lot so I will have to make a few checks. I left Minneapolis with just eleven dollars. Hope everything is going fine at home. Send the NEWS. Mail letters etc. to Naval Aviation Detc. Cambridge, Mass. M.I.T.
Love, Byrl.
P.S. Mother please mail one of my large pictures (the best one) to Marjorie Hurd, 1769 Marshall Ave. St. Paul, Minn.
Byrl.

April 19, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for the Cities Wednesday morning on a short visit.
Letter
New American House Boston

April 21, 1918 Sunday
Dear Folks,
Of all the funny places I have ever landed in, Boston has got them all beat. Little narrow streets and low buildings. The streets run in all directions and when you go out for a walk you go in circles. It was snowing the first day we came in and it has been raining ever since.
We are now stationed out at Tech and the system and everything is entirely different from Dunwoody. You are watched every minute of the day. Walk with your shoulders up, salute all the time. My arm is tired out today just from saluting. There are about 250 of us stationed in what used to be a bowling alley. My two blankets I brought along were not enough for this kind of weather, but it will soon be warm now and extra blankets are so hard to carry.
Tomorrow our exams start and the next two weeks are going to be tough ones. They have been kicking men out of this school right and left. For example, they are very strong on drill. The other day one of the men spit while in ranks and they canned him. Personal appearances they say goes a long ways etc. Well, what ever happens, am going to make a big try at it anyway. Write soon.
Love Byrl.

April 26, 1918- 14th annual First District Federation of Womens Clubs meeting at Lake City.
Mrs. Sylvester in attendance. (G. F.?)
Letter
Boston Tech
Sunday April 28, 1918
Dear Folks,
The exams are all over with and we all came out fine. 10 of our men left

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yesterday for points in Florida and one went to Ohio. A bunch leaves here every two weeks so the rest of us, fifteen in all, will leave on May 11, so that’s the way the dope runs now.
People are certainly wild over the war down here. There are 235 men stationed here in our quarters. Friday night a meeting was called to donate for the liberty loan. Talk about coming across. Our little bunch from Minnesota sat over in a corner and let the big boys do it who have the dough. Well they subscribed 140,000 in just twenty minutes. A bunch from University of California, Georgia and Missouri went in against the East – 5,000, 10,000 and even 20,000 bids were coming fast. One standard oil man made a proposition to the officer in charge that if he would let us all have an extra hour of sleep the next day he would buy a 10,000 dollar bond. The officer consented so we all got our sleep. Just think – 10,000 dollars for one hour’s sleep. Yesterday afternoon we went out to see Boston and Philadelphia play ball. Well I can’t say very much for big league baseball. Just as many fights as at a game at home.
Today is very fine out. A couple of us have been invited out for supper this evening. Dad’s letter was a dandy and it came at just the right time. I felt a little discouraged for a time but now I feel sure everything will be O. K. Am glad that Park writes often and is at Camp Upton. There may be a chance of my seeing him on my way south. The NEWS arrived here O. K. Hope the car is in good shape now. The gardens must be growing fine now. We are having regular spring weather here. Last Wednesday afternoon we had liberty so three of us took a little sight seeing trip and visited all the historical places around here. It was very interesting. Last Sunday Dave and myself went to church.
Well, lots of good luck. Write soon.
Love, Byrl.
Postcard
Cambridge, Mass., May 6, 1918
Dear Folks,
A little picture of the school here. Am on my way to Pensacola, Florida. Fine weather here.
Love, Byrl.
Mail letters directly to Pen. Fla.
Pensacola, Florida – San Carlos Hotel stationary
Sunday
Dear Folks,
Last week was a very busy one. So far I have 4 ½ hours of instruction in the air to my credit. About Wednesday or Thursday of this week I will make my "solo" flight or my first flight alone. Everything is coming fine. Am getting a little used to this climate and like it now. Am getting real brown from this hot Florida sun. One sheet is all the bed clothes we have over us at night. A number of us went out 25 miles on an auto trip this P. M. I certainly would not care to live here in this country at least.
That was a sad affair about Mr. Klockman. Edwin must be very busy now getting ready for graduation. I received the announcement. It was very neat, especially the motto – "over the top". I wonder if everyone in his class will stop to think just what that means. The Red Cross parade must have been a huge success. I would like to have been there. Am sorry too that will not be able to see young Ed graduate. He should consider himself as living during the happiest moments NOW. Dad must have the old fishing bug by this time. My what would I give to be able to go out fishing if only for once more. Do you realize that I am going on my second year in the military service?
Would like to have seen Paul before he goes over. It is a great opportunity for him. But all will come out O. K. in the end. Best of luck. I have confidence in my ability during my first flight. Alls’ well.

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Love, Byrl.

May 10, 1918- Senior Class Play, "The Spell of the Image."
John Harlan, friend and lawyer – Edwin Sylvester
Frederica Farr, a reporter – Katherine Sylvester
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent last Friday in Winona.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Miss Viva Nunamaker left for Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day.
Postcard

May 11, 1918
Savannah, Ga.
Dear Folks,
Staying over here a day – on my way south. There is just one place warmer than this!
Love, Byrl.
Postcard

May 12, 1918
Macon, Ga.
Dear Folks,
We are laying over here six hours. A very beautiful place. Am on my way to church. This is your day mother. Best wishes.
Love, Byrl.
Letter
Wednesday May 16, 1918
Dear Folks,
We arrived here last Monday after a very fine trip coming down which lasted 6 days. We spent one day at Savannah. One at Macon, Ga. which was Sunday, and then 4 hours at Montgomery, Alabama. We were taken out to several southern plantations. The homes are very beautiful. The gardens are nice and green, corn is up about two feet, and the cotton plants are also up. The southern people are very fine to get along with. Met several very beautiful southern girls. The most beautiful, I believe, that I have ever seen.
After arriving here we were put into a camp and have received several physical exams, all of which I passed O.K. We will be moved over to the main yard the last of the week and will soon be doing our regular flying. This station is absolutely the best in the country and we will receive all our training here (including advanced work.) It will take at least a couple of months and maybe longer. We could not help but notice after arriving here the difference in climate. Very hot days but cool evenings. The heat is not the sultry kind though. Have been swimming in the gulf twice. Stayed in for over an hour yesterday just swimming around getting in condition. My neck, arms, and shoulders are pretty much burned, but by the time I go home on furlough, I will be tanned like an Indian.
Gee! It’s dandy that Edwin Jr. is graduating now. High school class play. Well he is in the best part of his young life right now. He should be congratulated. I will try to write to him before long. Received the NEWS all O.K. While in Boston I called at the Naval Hospital to visit one of our men sick there and ran on to Herbert Timm. He was certainly glad to see me and I cheered they boy up a bit. Am feeling fine and the world here is very safe as they have the equipment and good instructors. I expressed my old things home. Please acknowledge same.
Love, Byrl.
Saturday May 18, 1918
Dear Folks,
Yesterday evening we finished our physical exams and were sent down to the main quarters. Everything is very fine here. One of the officers called the men into his office one at a time and had a personal interview. He was very fine. Congratulated me on my


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foreign service, etc. and then asked me what squadron I preferred here. I had been tipped off before hand that II was the best. Well I was put in No. II. This morning we reported at the flying hangers at 10:30. 4 of us were assigned to sec. B. squad II.
My name was at once put up on the blackboard and at 12:15 I was given a helmet and a pair of goggles. It was my first flight with an instructor. Just as soon as the plane left the water I was given the controls. Gee! Whiz! but it is a wonderful sensation. It is a wonderful feeling when the nose of the plane is pointed directly down and you drop for quite a distance. We stayed up for 1 hour and 5 minutes. The first flight is called a "pay hop". My pay has now increased 50% but it will take a couple of months before I receive it. The training station here is a regular city in itself. I will tell you more about it next letter. We were all invited down town to this hotel to a dancing party. Am too tired to dance. Now when I say that, I am very tired. Tomorrow is Sunday. There will be no liberty. Flying all day long. I expect to get another hour or two in tomorrow.
Just one year ago tomorrow I left N.Y. for France. Hope you all are well and happy.
Love, Byrl.
Letter
Thursday May 23, 1918
Dear Folks,
Just received Mother’s letter. It went over in another department here. After this, use the old address – U.S. Naval Air Station. Have 21 ½ hours to my credit now. Passed one of my tests this morning. Went up to 6,100 feet. The test called for 6,000. I added on 100 for good luck. It is the highest up I have ever been. Took me 55 minutes to get up there. I spiraled down and landed near a _____ out in the bay just off Pensacola. Made four and a half spirals coming down which took about three minutes time. We are supposed to get in about three hours each day now. Saw a list of the men who are slated to leave here July 22, or finish their elementary flying at that time, and my name was on the list. Of course it is too early yet to know where we will go or anything about it. (Just keep this under your hat). Am allowed to take a passenger up with me now. But guess my wings have not sufficiently sprouted to do that. It’s a good idea, you know, to knock on wood in this game. Glad to hear Ma’s pigs are fat. I’ll bet their hair is brushed every morning. Received a fine letter from Meta. Been going to try to finish up my tests this week. Busy all the time.
Love, Byrl.

May 24, 1918- Two window displays that particularly attracted the people visiting the city Saturday were that of the Junior Red Cross, displays in the windows of F. J. Cornwell and the one in the Plainview Drug Co. displaying the war relics secured by Byrl Sylvester while in the service in France. Both have proven very attractive features and caused everyone to stop and look them over.

May 31, 1918- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester who has served in various offices for the past 15 years, has been elected First District Federation treasurer and would not succeed herself as V.P. another year.

June 7, 1918- Graduation May 31, Friday.
"As the class entered the hall, Miss Marion Sylvester presided at the piano as they marched down the aisle and took their places on the stage…" (NOTE: Graduation exercises were held in the Opera House)
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and little daughter of Ames, Iowa arrived Friday on a surprise visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, and to attend the graduation exercises of the Plainview High School.
Civic League make annual report: Sec. – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

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Sunday June 9, 1918
Dear Folks,
Received your two letters last week. They were both very good. The NEWS comes every week now. The past week has been a very busy one for me. I put in ten hours of "solo" flying. The last couple of days I have been practicing spirals in the air. This next week I intend to try for my tests, which are as follows: Six thousand foot altitude, a cross wind test, and then we have to go up three thousand, shut off all our power and spiral down to the water landing within two hundred feet of a small boat. I expect to have in nearly twenty-five hours by next Saturday night.
It has been passed out that we are to leave here about June 22. After our elementary flying is finished, we will be sent north to flying stations along the Atlantic Coast. They are hurrying it through as fast as possible owing to the recent work of the enemy submarines on this side. Some of the men will take up their advanced training in bombing and machine guns and then be sent over. Am undecided just what to do at present. Suppose the Government will do just as they please any way. Another report is that if we are sent to do coast patrol work for subs, that we will receive our commissions shortly but am not worrying much about a commission now.
Park no doubt is on the other side by this time. Right now is the most serious time since the war started. He will not be sent in until late in the Fall at the earliest. It was fine that Meta was able to be home to see you Ed get his sheep skin. What ball team does he play with?
Last Saturday morning I got up at five and went up for 45 minutes. It was a beautiful sight. The sun was just coming up. Before I got back a little rain storm came up. I was up about one thousand when I felt the rain cutting me in the face. I at once nosed her over, cut the gun and glided down to the water and then ran for the hangers. It was quite an experience. I expect to get in about three hours flying each day now.
Best of luck and happiness.
Love, Byrl.

June 14, 1918- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Mrs. A. O. Knowlton, and Mrs. L. Hostettler of Elgin left for Minneapolis Tuesday morning as delegates from the Ladies Circle to attend the G. A. R. Convention.

June 21, 1918-
Plainview Boy Killed in Sea Plane Accident in Florida Wednesday.
Byrl E. Sylvester, This City’s Young War Here, Meets With Death While in Training
For Service at Air Station in Pensacola, Florida
Message Received First of Week Conveys Sad News to Parents
Popular Young Man, With Lots of War Experience, First Local Boy to Succumb
While on Duty for His Country – Body expected to Arrive Last of Week
The horrors of the world’s great conflict in which the United States and her Allies are fighting, was brought home to Plainview when on Wednesday word was received by Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester that their son, Byrl E. Sylvester, had been killed in a seaplane accident at the U. S. Naval Air Station at Pensacola, Florida.
The entire community was shrouded in deepest sorrow as the news was conveyed from one to another that Byrl, one of the best known and highly esteemed young men of this part of the state, had met sudden death in a seaplane accident.
The brief message communicated to his parents reached them shortly before noon. The tragic news spread rapidly and brought profound sorrow to all of this city. It made every parent of the boys now in the service shudder with the thought of safety for their own.
No young man of this community was held in higher regard than Byrl by young and old alike. His pleasing and friendly manner while at home and the courage he has shown in his loyalty of purpose in entering the service of his country a second time had made him fairly beloved by all the people of this part of the state.

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On April 24, 1917, he left his position with the Plainview State Bank to enter the service of the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps leaving for France where he served for nearly five months when on September 12, 1917, while in active service he was severely wounded being hit by parts of a shell in the hip and back. His chum and comrade, Robert Hall, was killed at the same time before his eyes.
After weeks in the French and American hospitals he returned home on November 3. He was presented with the French Croix de Guerre for courageous service in action.
During his service abroad his ardor to do his part in this great war was strengthened. In him had grown a desire to serve his country, it had become to him a sacred duty and he could not throw off the desire to return to the service.
Filled with so loyal a spirit he again entered the service on December 1st, joining the Naval Aviation Corps and entered the Dunwoody Institute at Minneapolis with a class of 25 where he spent the next few months in training. Early in the spring he was sent to Boston for further training. About six weeks ago he was sent to the Naval Air Station at Pensacola, Floa., to complete his training. He would have finished his training on Saturday of this week when he anticipated being placed into service at coast guard or sent to France.
It is said of Byrl that on his return from France he did as much for the government in the recruiting service as any man in this section of the state. His talks in the various towns telling of his experience and conditions in France enthused many a young man to see his duty.
The latest report from the Air Station to the effect that Mr. Sylvester and A. Breinblair, Naval Reserve Aviator, were killed near the navy air station Wednesday morning when their planes collided.
The remains were started from Pensacola Thursday noon and are expected to arrive here by Saturday night.
Funeral arrangements are being made for Monday afternoon from the home, weather permitting the services will be held on the lawn. A military service is being arranged for. A squad of the Home Guards from Winona and an escort of Naval men from Dunwoody Institute, Minneapolis, will be present and take part in the services.
MESSAGE TO PARENTS SHOWS APPRECIATION
Minneapolis, Minn. 12:30 PM
Thursday June 20, 1918
E. L. Sylvester
Plainview Minn.
Officers and Members of the Aero Club of Minneapolis extend to you and your family our most sincere sympathy in this hour of your great affliction. Your son was one of the most beloved members of the pilots class at Dunwoody Institute and housed in the Aero Club building. He died for his country and we wish to show in our humble way our appreciation. Will you kindly wire me full details of the accident when received by you, also wire me whether the remains will pass through Minneapolis on the way to Plainview as we should like to pay proper honor to your son.
Wm. F. Brooks, President.

June 28, 1918-
Plainview Dead War Hero Given Full Martial Honors
Business Suspends in Plainview While Thousands Gather at Funeral of Byrl
Sylvester on Monday – Military Escort
Popular Local Man Killed in Seaplane Collision at Naval Air Station in
Pensacola, Florida, on June 19th, Is Buried with Full Military Honors in Most
Beautiful and Impressive Way
Honor Memory of First Wabasha County Boy to Win the French Croix de Guerre
Dunwoody Training Station Students, Winona Home Guards and Various

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Lodges Pay Last Respects to Departed Hero – Abundance of Beautiful Floral
Tributes Bespeak High Regard by Friends and Associates
The profound honor and respect in which Byrl E. Sylvester was held by all of this community and surrounding country was clearly manifest by the throng of nearly 5,000 people who congregated in Plainview on Monday afternoon to pay a last tribute to this hero of the war. The funeral was one of the most impressive and largest burial services ever held in this part of the state.
The remains arrived from Pensacola, Florida, Sunday morning, having been accompanied through by his friend and companion, C. M. Sanborn, student naval aviator, and met at Chicago by the father, E. L. Sylvester. Several auto loads of friends drove to Eyota Sunday morning to accompany home the remains.
During Sunday and Monday morning the body lay in state and was viewed by many thousand friends at the Sylvester home. All Sunday afternoon and Monday morning thousands of friends passed the khaki colored bier and for hours the long line with bowed heads, slowly wended its way through the home.
Byrl Sylvester, Plainview’s war hero, who met death while flying at Pensacola Naval Station, Wednesday morning June 19 at 6:30 o’clock, was born at Plainview October 29, 1892, the second son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. His life in this community is known to all, cheerful, courteous and ambitious. As a boy, liked by all his companions, and as a young man admired and esteemed by associates and friends. He received his education in the Plainview High School, after which he attended the State University for three years, becoming a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. After leaving school he became connected with his father’s bank, becoming a valued assistance. In this position he added to his many friends by his courteous treatment, pleasant and accommodating manners.
After war had been declared he became enthused with the same spirit that prevailed in the hearts of many of his college friends. He left his position in the Plainview State Bank and on April 24, 1917 entered the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, leaving for France where he spent five months in active Red Cross service as an ambulance driver until he was wounded in action, September 12, 1917. After returning home to recover from his injuries, he had but one aim, that of returning to France to do his part in the great struggle. From the time of his return he was a changed man. That buoyant spirit he had carried all this life, had left him. The stern reality of war and what it meant to the people of Belgium and France seemed always to be his foremost thought. He had attained a serious attitude, feeling that he owed a duty in returning to that war ridden country to aid in securing a permanent peace.
As he regained his strength his chief thought was upon the war and the sacred duty of doing all in his power for suffering France. Most modest toward himself he was most enthusiastic in his patriotism. Acquainted with all the horrors of war, and well knowing his possible fate, he could remain home no longer, and reenlisted for service, this time with the U. S. Forces. From Dunwoody Institute he went to the Boston School of Technology, studying aviation as a member of the naval flying corps. Six weeks ago he was transferred to the naval aviation station at Pensacola, where he would have completed his course and received his commission within a few days. His death was due to a collision with another machine 700 feet in midair. His body fell into the bay and was recovered. The news of his death was the greatest shock that ever befell this community.
The funeral was held from the home in this city Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The services were conducted by H. J. Hill, pastor of the Church of Christ, who gave a most complimentary tribute to our departed hero. The services were held on the front porch in front of which several thousand people were gathered. The immediate relatives were seated in the front parlor near the bier. Dr. J. P. Caldwell, a brother-in-law of

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deceased, opened the services with a solo, "Lead Kindly Light." Mr. Hill offered prayer and Dr. Caldwell sang "My Country Tis of Thee" before the sermon was preached. The simple recounting of Byrl’s life was the greatest tribute that could be paid by the pastor in his sermon.
A large American flag was the only covering on the casket as it was borne from the house. A squad of sailors from Dunwoody training station at Minneapolis were the pall bearers and intimate friends were the body bearers. They were Glenn S. Witherstine, Rochester, G. A. Stoltz, A. S. Kennedy, George Vermilya, Ralph Murray, and Dr. T. J. Moore. A squad of twenty sailors and aviation students led the funeral procession. Immediately after the hearse came the pall bearers and body bearers. Medical officers and the Winona Home Guards proceeded the auto carrying the members of the family, relatives and mourners. Then came the long line of Masons, including many from Elgin, Eyota, Dover, St. Charles, Rochester, and Winona, the Odd Fellows and friends from many parts of Wabasha, Olmsted, and Winona counties. The burial rites at the grave were in charge of the Masonic Lodge, of which he was a member. The Masonic ritual was read at the grave after which full military honors were given, the squad of sailors fired a solute of volleys across the final resting place. Taps were then blown by one of the buglers, while another, standing some distance away, blew an "echo" of the taps and the beautiful and impressive service was over.
We would be glad if we could say all that there is in our heart to say, but how shall a man enumerate the virtues of a friend or catalog the factors of his affection? Yet we would like to have the world know him as we knew him. It is true he is gone, but his memory remains. What he was to each of us and what he was to this home will abide as a gracious recollection throughout all coming years. He will continue with us as a part of our experience and of our lives. In no other calling or pursuit do men learn so keenly and justly to appraise each other and to know and value them. Character in the area is always subjected to the acid test and nowhere else are such warm and enduring friends formed as these which develop out of this great world struggle we are now experiencing.
The supreme test now being asked of your young men reveal not alone what flaws and defects there may be in life and character, but it brings out the strong qualities and the noble qualities of character as well. It is in that same test the record and character of Byrl Sylvester shines stainless and flawless. He was one of the strong young men, industrious, studious, tireless, a high type of American soldier. His life must serve both as an example and as an inspiration to the young men of America. He was considerate and courteous, sympathetic to a degree and rejoined in the service of his country. In his quiet way he was eager and anxious to do his bit.
There is no many to whom this entire community turns with more profound respect than to our war hero. In all his efforts he was exact and painstaking and never spared himself. Few of us will ever forget his last appearance in Plainview. Though he had seen much of the great conflict and suffered from its pain, he gave no sign. He was cheerful, patient, polite through it all. His devotion to duty, his stern sense of responsibility, his obedience to conscious were so complete that all other considerations gave way for the task which he felt it was his duty to complete. He was modest and unobtrusive in his demeanor, but resolute and unswerving in maintaining a decision arrived at after reflection and always ready to give reason for the faith that was in him. He was a delightful and interesting companion as will be attested by all who knew him well. He was an optimist, hopeful not despondent. His whole philosophy of life was sweet and wholesome and he lived up to his philosophy. Whether it was stormy or whether the sun was shining, his attitude was one of complacency, for he lived as one who did daily his daily task and left the consequences with God.
We say he is dead, which is to say his soul has parted company with the

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tenement of clay; but the impulse he imparted to us shall continue to live in us and bear fruit, each after its kind; and we, in turn, shall pass them on to those that follow us. Our friend’s body is gone, but his dreams of service and of human duty remain. His death not only brought the deepest sorrow and sadness to the paternal home but has cast a gloom over the entire community. We are reminded in the sacrifice of this young man’s life for his country that we live not in years, but in deeds and the influence of his brave sacrifice upon our citizens and those of the state cannot be estimated. Realizing the sorrow it has brought in this home and feeling the los it has brought to our country all extend heartfelt sympathy.
Deceased is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, two brothers, Park, with the 315th Co. F. A. now in France, and Edwin Jr. at home, two sisters, Mrs. Nettie Caldwell, Coleraine, and Mrs. Meta Holmes, Ames Iowa.
Numerous and most beautiful floral tributes were in evidence at the services bespeaking the high regard in which he was held in the various orders and by his host of friends. Among the largest was the reproduction of a service flag of flowers with a gold star in the center. The American flag was also reproduced in flowers.
Mrs. J. W. Dyer came down from St. Paul last week to be present at the funeral of her nephew, Byrl Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes of Ames, Iowa arrived last week being called here by the sudden death of her brother, Byrl Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. C. Landon drove up from Winona Sunday on a visit to the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Fisk, remaining over to attend the funeral of Byrl Sylvester Monday.
Among the naval squad from Dunwoody who attended the Sylvester funeral was Norman Hick, a former Plainview High School student who considered himself very fortunate to be among those picked to attend the services.
U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION
Pensacola, Florida
My dear Mr. Sylvester,
In further connection with telegram sent you from this station, I am writing you additional details concerning the deplorable accident which resulted in the death of your son.
The accident occurred at 6:30 AM June 19th while Chief Quartermaster Sylvester and Blair were in formation flight together with two other planes. Your son was at an altitude of 700 feet, a few hundred yards in the rear of and 200 yards above the leader of the formation. Blair was on the same level with your son and a few hundred yards to the rear and to the left. The formation was making a right turn over the water near the station when your son’s plane was seen to skid to the left and crash into Blair’s plane while he was in the right turn. Your son’s plane seemed to slow up because of the skid and thus Blair’s plane hung up with him.
It appears the pilots of both lanes were intent upon following the leader and probably did not see each other until just before the crash. The planes immediately locked wings and swung around into a head-on collision and instantly fell into the water, separating after having fallen several hundred feet.
Blair was seen to fall from his plane at about 100 feet from the water. The force of the collision must have broken the seat strap with which he was secured and his death must have been instantaneous.
The speed boat proceeded immediately to the spot where Blair was seen to strike the water and one of the crew seeing him five or six feet below the surface dove

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down and managed to get hold of his life preserver, but when rising to the surface the life preserver slipped off and though diving was kept up in that vicinity for hours his body was never recovered. This was probably due to the fact that there was a strong ebb tide flowing at the time.
Since that time boats have searched the Bay thoroughly and constantly during the daylight; divers have examined the bottom; drag nets have been used as long as daylight has allowed and the beaches have been searched, but to no avail. The search will be further continued.
This special information in regard to Blair is given you in the hope that it may be some little comfort to you to know that the body of your own son was not lost as in the case of Blair.
Your son’s efficiency and aptitude have been so great that he was about to receive his commission in record time. He was one of our most promising young officers and his death was a sorrow to the whole station and a great loss to the Navy. In writing this letter I am endeavoring to do what I can to convey what little comfort is possible to the parents of this fine patriotic young man who has given his life in the line of duty for his country in her great crisis. The whole station extends deepest sympathy to the parents of Byrl Edwin Sylvester COM, U.S.N.R.F.
Very sincerely,
F. W. Bennett
Captain U. S. Navy
Commandant

July 5, 1918- Miss Marion Sylvester left Tuesday for Big Lake to spend a week with her friend, Miss Imogene Lutz.

July 12, 1918- Miss Marion Evans, who has been visiting Miss Katherine Sylvester for a few days, returned to her home at Wabasha Friday.

July 26, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and son Edwin Jr. left last Friday morning on an auto trip to Ames, Iowa and Coleraine, Minnesota where they will visit for sometime with their daughters.

August 16, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last Saturday from a long auto tour visiting many points in Iowa and Northern Minnesota. They have enjoyed a delightful visit and passed through some very beautiful country. With the abundant crops it is indeed a pleasure to drive through the country this year and note the prosperous conditions of our farmers.

August 23, 1918- The following letter of condolence to Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester indicate the length of time it requires for home news to reach the boys at the front in France.
My Dear Friends: I received a letter from Mother today (July 29) telling of the accident which resulted in Byrl’s death and it was indeed a great shock. Why one so dearly loved by all who knew him, should meet with such a tragic end is beyond our power to answer. We are on this earth for a purpose at the Great Master’s will and having served this purpose, He calls us home.
I offer my heartfelt sympathy during these dark hours of sorrow. "This was a man". His will be done.
Sergeant Thaddeus D. Davey. (NOTE: Thaddeus Davey will die of T. B. on board ship coming back from France.)
They also received a letter of condolence from Byrl’s former school mate and chum, Alvin Dickman.

August 30, 1918- G. F. Sylvester and family returned last week from their auto trip to Moline, Ill. They have greatly enjoyed their outing and visited many points of interest. On their return they spent a day at Camp Grant, but were unable to see many of the Plainview boys.
Miss Alice Dyer of St. Paul is a guest at the home of G. F. Sylvester.

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The Congregational guild will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children of Ames, Iowa are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

September 13, 1918- Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children, who have been guests at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester for the past few weeks, departed for their home at Ames, Iowa Saturday.

October 4, 1918- Students having 90 or above average for September – Marion Sylvester.

October 11, 1918- School Notes- Edwin Sylvester Jr. is a student at the University of Minnesota. Miss Katherine Sylvester of the class of 1918 is now a student at Hamline University.

October 18, 1918- Schools close Friday – Flu epidemic.
No church services, dances canceled. Travelers Club postponed. GEM theater closed.

October 25, 1918- 15 influenza victims is toll in Plainview past week. City hall turned into hospital.

November 1, 1918- Flu abating.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester were called to the Cities last week by the illness of their son, Edwin, who were pleased to state he is improving.
Word was received from Edwin Sylvester last week that he was able to sit up. He has been ill at the government hospital at Fort Snelling with the influenza. Latest reports state that he would be able to return to school in a few days.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Monday in Rochester.

November 8, 1918- School to reopen Monday. City hall hospital closed.
The following short letter was received by Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester from their son Park, now in France. September 8, 1918
Dear Folks at Home, Well here it is just one year since I left Plainview. Does not seem very long, time flies so fast over here. Just received your letter of July 7th, so you see mail travels very slow. Received a fine letter from Nettie, but we are on the go so much do not have any daylight to write in and cannot have a light at night, so will have to ask you to send this to them. When the drive is over will write more and at least once a week.
Was up with the horses last night and saw some fine artillery fire. Old Jerry did not return much of it either. We are having a lot of rain here now and some mud. It was quite clear the other day and I had a pretty good view of (cut by censor) so you know about where we are.
Wish you could send me a pair of high top shoes, as we cannot get any here. Could also use some wool socks with them.
Am feeling fine and have lots of friends here. The officers of Bat. C. have been fine to me and give me most anything I want. Say hello to all the boys, and cheer up folks for every dark cloud has silver lining.
Tell Dad not to miss the deer hunt this fall and next year I will go up with him. Love to all, Park D. Sylvester.

November 15, 1918- End of War Occasion of Big Demonstration on Monday.

November 22, 1918- E. G. Krause and W. C. Allen returned from Big Lake laws week near which they spent a few days hunting big game…
Prof. R. J. Holmes of Ames, Iowa has been elected head of the English department of the Jamestown College, Jamestown, N.D. and will soon move his family to that city.

November 29, 1918- Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and E. G. Krause spent Saturday with friends in Rochester.
Miss Katherine Sylvester, who is attending Hamline University, was a H. S. caller

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Monday.

December 6, 1919- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Saturday where she met her daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and little son Colraine, who will visit here for a time.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell, went to Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day with friends.

December 13, 1918- Poultry Show
Silver Campines: 1st cock – G. F. Sylvester, 1st hen – G. F. Sylvester, 2nd hen – G. F. Sylvester.

December 20, 1918- Program at High school
Piano duet – Marion Sylvester & Elsie Glaesmer
E. L. Sylvester accompanied by Alfred Burkhardt and Will G. Mack drove to Wabasha Tuesday afternoon where he met his son, Edwin, a member of the S. A. T. C. who was returning home from Minneapolis.
Local churches unit to give community Christmas tree at Wednesday evening December 25. Opera House.
"A musical Reading." Marion Sylvester.

December 27, 1918- Travelers Club December 31 – Opera House.
Comedy Program.
"Song Skit" – Marion Sylvester & Frank Austin
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Monday morning to spend the day with friends.
E. L. Sylvester received his Christmas letter from his son Park on Monday written November 23. He states that he was in the last drive from start to finish.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester received a letter last week which will be a reminder of an historic occasion, the first trip of the N.Y. – Cleveland – Chicago aerial mail. It is a letter from the Aerial League of America, expressing sympathy for the loss of her son, B. E. Sylvester, in which it says-
"He volunteered in the air service to help our country win the fight for civilization and humanity and the Aerial League of America feels proud to inscribe his name on its honor roll, which contains the names of all the brave aviators who lost their lives for their country. In expressing to you our heartfelt sympathy, we also wish to assure you that we shall feel honored to welcome you in the League as a member."

August Post, Ex. Secretary.

=== [ 1919 ] ===

January 3, 1919- The Ladies Union of the Christian Church will hold their annual meeting at the E. L. Sylvester home on Wednesday January 8. All members are earnestly requested to be present as there is important business to be transacted.

January 10, 1919- Theodore Roosevelt death.
Edwin Sylvester Jr. left for Mankato Saturday where he will take a course in the Commercial College.
(Miss Imogene Lutz, one of our former teachers, now at Hamline.)

January 17, 1919- E. L. Sylvester made a short business trip to Viola Monday morning.
Philomathian Literary Society program January 22 Wednesday evening. 10 cent admission.
Solo – Marion Sylvester
Quartet – Dorothy Slocumb, Ella Bolton, Elizabeth Mack, Marion Sylvester.

January 31, 1919- Edwin Sylvester Jr., who has been spending the past two weeks at home while nursing a broken thumb, returned to Mankato Saturday to resume his studies at the Commercial College.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was called to Coleraine Monday morning by the serious illness

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of her little grandson, the son of Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell. It was feared that the little one had developed pneumonia.

February 7, 1919- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last week from her visit to the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. P. Calwell at Coleraine, and reports her little grandson out of danger and improving.

February 14, 1919- Mrs. Buss of Rochester was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester a few days this week.
Old Settlers Meeting – E. L. Sylvester, secretary.

February 21, 1919- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester spent Friday in Rochester in attendance at the meeting of the Federation of Women’s Clubs.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for St. Paul Wednesday afternoon on a visit to their daughter, Miss Katherine and to attend the auto show. On their return they expect to be met by their daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill who is coming home on a visit.

February 28, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned the first of the week from their visit to the Cities. They were accompanied by their daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Moline, Ill. who will visit for a time at the old home.

March 7, 1919- Mrs. R. J. R. Baker who has been a guest at the home of her parents for a few days, departed for her home at Moline Ill Monday afternoon.
E. L. Sylvester is having his home on Broadway entirely remodeled and when completed will have as fine a modern home as there is in the city. H. C. Anderson is doing the work. While the work is going on, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester are boarding at the hotel.

March 14, 1919- Article about 23 "Dekes" unusual pact (Byrl Sylvester)
… Byrl Sylvester, Plainview boy who lost his life in an airplane accident and who was one of the most popular young men in Southern Minnesota, was one of 23 Deke fraternity brothers who shortly after the war broke out made a most unusual pact, at a reunion dinner. The pact, solemnly agreed to by all, was that the next reunion should be in Berlin. Their agreement can never be fulfilled for some, including Sylvester, have given their lives to their country and others have already returned to this country from foreign services. All gloriously distinguished themselves. 2 dead – Robert Hall & Byrl Sylvester. 15 in France awaiting orders, 6 home…
Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and Lillian Bateman went to Rochester Wednesday morning to spend the day.
A number of lady friends tendered Mrs. G. F. Sylvester a surprise last Friday evening. Bridge and a dainty lunch were enjoyed.
M. Schneider and E. L. Sylvester attended the Farm Bureau meeting at Zumbro Falls on Wednesday. They went by way of Theilman and on their return found the water so high in the Zumbro bottoms they deferred their return home until Thursday morning when the water was still up to the hubs of the buggy. (NOTE: Due to heavy rain and melting snow.)

March 21, 1919- Edwin Sylvester came down from Mankato Friday on a visit to his parents, returning to his school work Monday morning.

March 28, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Tuesday in Rochester.
A special meeting of the Ladies Circle will be held at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Monday evening. All members are requested to be present to meet Mrs. Holmbery, the District President.

April 11, 1919- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Wednesday for Lake City to attend the Victory Loan meeting and luncheon of the women of the 9th Fed. District, together with Wabasha county and adjoining counties.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, A. M. Wentworth, J. A. Slocumb, and C. D. Breed left for Lake City Thursday morning to attend a Victory Loan meeting and luncheon for the

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women of the 9th Federal District.

April 18, 1919- Honors for month of March – High School – Marion Sylvester.
The following Plainview members of the Scottish Rite left for Wabasha on Thursday morning to attend the Maundy – Thursday banquet: E. L and G. F. Sylvester, C. L. Waterman, H. D. and Dr. E. E. Smith, Victor Smith, and Chas. Posz.
The Ladies Circle will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon. A picnic supper will be served and all are invited.

April 25, 1919- Edwin Sylvester came down from Mankato last Saturday to enjoy the spring vacation at home.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester last Friday on a short visit to friends and to meet her daughter, Miss Katherine, who was returning from Hamline on a short vacation.
E. L. Sylvester, M. J. Manchester, Charles Richmond, W. G. Mack, and Victor Smith were among those from here who left for the Cities Wednesday where they are in attendance at the Shriners Convention being held there this week.

May 2, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester spent Thursday in Winona.

May 9, 1919- (Thaddeus Davey dies of TB before reaching states.)
Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and Lillian Bateman left for Minneapolis Sunday afternoon to spend a few days in the Cities.
Operetta in 2 parts, "The Japanese Girl."
Girls Glee Club – May 14 – Opera House.
"Miss Knowall, and American Governess" – Marion Sylvester.
E. L. Sylvester left for St. Paul Wednesday afternoon to attend the reception tendered the Rainbow Division.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester received a message from their son, Park, Monday announcing his arrival at N.Y. that morning. The whole 82nd division has returned. Park expects to be home in about 2 weeks.
Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, E. W. Schwanbeck and B. F. Nichols left for Waseca Thursday morning to attend the First District Federation of Women’s Clubs Convention.
"Japanese Girl" repeated at Opera House at afternoon matinee.

June 6, 1919- Miss Katherine Sylvester, of Plainview, attending Hamline University in St. Paul, will take part with 400 other students and faculty members in the Victory pageant of Hamline University on the college campus, Saturday evening June 7th as a part of the 61st annual commencement.
Miss Katherine Sylvester will be a representative of the Freshman class in the chorus of the grand finale…
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Buss and Miss Maybelle Brown of Rochester were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester on Memorial Day.
Walter Stephan and E. L. Sylvester have to their credit the largest pickerel caught by any Plainview fisherman this season. They landed a ten pound at Camp Schmoker Sunday afternoon.

June 13, 1919- Miss Marion Sylvester left for St. Paul Saturday morning to attend the Victory Pageant of Hamline University and to spend a few days with her sister Miss Katherine.
Park Sylvester left for Rochester Friday morning to spend a few days with friends.

June 20, 1919- Miss Katherine Sylvester returned from Hamline University last week for the summer vacation.
E. L. Sylvester on Monday purchased the old Krusemark farm consisting of 160 acres in Oakwood of Ernest Brueske. The deal was made through George Dickman.
Park Sylvester, who has been enjoying a 30 day furlough at the home of his parents in the city, left last Friday morning for Rochester to spend the day, leaving there Saturday morning for Camp Upton, M.Y. where he expects shortly to enter veterinary

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school.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and daughter Mrs. J. P. Caldwell went to Rochester Wednesday morning to spend the day.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and little son of Coleraine arrived last Saturday on an extended visit to the home of her parents. They were met at Rochester by her mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

July 4, 1919- E. L. Sylvester this week purchased about 120 acres of the John Lee farm in Highland.

July 18, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester moved into their newly remodeled home Saturday. They now have one of the finest homes in the city.
Miss Katherine Sylvester left for Rochester Monday where she has accepted a position in the Mayo Clinic laboratory.
E. L. Sylvester purchased the Pat Curran 160 acre farm north of the city last week. The deal was made through Geo. H. Dickman.

August 22, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, who have been enjoying a several days visit at the home of their daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker at Moline Ill, returned home last Thursday afternoon.
E. L. Sylvester disposed of the Curran farm this week to David Hill of Honey Ridge.

August 29, 1919- Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent Sunday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children of Jamestown, N.D. arrived Friday on a visit to the home of her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
The Congregational Guild will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester yesterday morning where she spent the day.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester received the sad news last week of the death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. James H. Whilt of Eureka, Montana who passed away at the Sacred Heart Hospital at Spokane, Washington last Thursday night.

September 5, 1919- E. L. Sylvester this week purchased through the S. S. Lyons agency, the Pete Peters 80 acre farm one mile north of Plainview.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day with her daughter Miss Katherine.

September 12, 1919- E. L. Sylvester disposed of the John Krusmark farm recently purchased, last week to William Krusmark, closing the deal through W. C. Allen.

September 19, 1919- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Saturday in Rochester.
E. L. Sylvester disposed of the 210 acre tract purchased of John Lee in Highland to Joe and George Markus Tuesday. The tract adjoins their land and will make them an excellent addition to their property.

October 3, 1919- Travelers Club to launch years work October 6 at the home of Mrs. G. F. Sylvester… The study of the different phases of foreign countries will receive adequate emphasis in the club’s work this year, and Americanization will be one of the feature studies by the organization…
Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Stanton have moved from Spring Valley onto their farm recently purchased of E. L. Sylvester known as the Pat Curran farm.
E. L. Sylvester disposed of the O’Connell residence and 7 acres of land in the Posz addition last week to Frank Wiley of Hammond who will make his home here.
E. L. Sylvester purchased the 30 acre tract of William Irish in Section 1, formerly known as the Theo Garrison farm last Friday.

October 10, 1919- Senior class officers: Iva Allen – President, Grace Belsheim – V.P., Marion Sylvester – Sec. Treas.

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The girls have organized an athletic association of which Marion Sylvester is president. The girls intend to play some great BB games and bring fame to our PHS. Each class will have a team…
E. L. Sylvester disposed of the 30 acre tract recently purchased of William Irish to Frank Governor the first of the week.

October 17, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker, accompanied by his mother Mrs. Alice Baker, autoed up from Moline, Ill last week on a visit to the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Wednesday afternoon to spend a few days with her son, Edwin who is attending the State University. On her return she expects to be accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of Coleraine.
Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck entertained at a 6 o’clock dinner Monday evening in honor of Mesdames R. J. R. Baker and Alice Baker at her farm home in Elgin township.

October 31, 1919- Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell spent Monday in Rochester.

November 7, 1919- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and little son, who have been spending a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, departed for their home at Coleraine last Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Marion, spent Saturday in Rochester.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Marion went to Rochester Wednesday morning to spend the day.

November 14, 1919- Among the party leaving Tuesday morning for Big Fork to hunt deer were E. L. Sylvester, W. T. Lea, Curtis Slawson, Charles and John Donaldson. They have made arrangements for a camp and expect to thoroughly enjoy a several days outing.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Tuesday morning for Eureka, Montana in response to a telegram announcing that her mother was not expected to survive long.
Among those who attended the Shrine gathering at St. Paul Friday evening from Plainview… Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Marion…

November 21, 1919- The following deer hunters returned last week from the northern part of the state: Will Allen, W. T. Lea, E. L. Sylvester, C. T. Donaldson, John Donaldson, and Curtis Slawson. They found lots of snow in the north but had a jolly good time and secured the limit of game.
Miss Katherine Sylvester came over from Rochester Wednesday and spent Thanksgiving at home.

December 12, 1919- The Ladies Union of the Christian Church will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester December 17.
The H. S. is preparing a 1 act comedy entitled "Too much of a Good thing" for the Christmas program which is to be given by the grades and H. S. Thursday evening.
Eunice Bawk – Marion Sylvester.

December 19, 1919- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Thursday to attend the funeral of Ensign J. C. Flood who was a member of the class of 25 – Byrl E. Sylvester and is the fourth to meet death by accident. Ensign Flood met his death at the Arcadia Aviation field, Florida, from injuries received when his plane crashed to the ground. He had been doing experimental flying and an "air trap" crash caused the accident.
December 26, 1919- Program Friday at Assembly Room in High School. Reading by Marion Sylvester entitled "Tom Sawyer’s Love Affair."

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=== [ 1920 ] ===

January 2, 1920- Miss Katherine Sylvester spent Christmas Day at the home of her parents, returning to Rochester the following day.

January 16, 1920- Members of the Masonic Lodge enjoyed a pleasant evening at dancing and cards Tuesday evening with a light lunch served at midnight. Upwards of 75 were present and spent one of the jolliest evenings of the season. Music was furnished by Joe Graner, Val Cook and Miss Marion Sylvester and was highly pleasing to all…

January 23, 1920- The Ladies Circle of the GAR will meet with Mrs. E. L. Sylvester next Tuesday afternoon January 27. A picnic supper will be served.
E. L. Sylvester has purchased the C. A Venables 120 acre farm, known as the Knapp place. This is a finely located farm and will make someone an excellent home.

February 6, 1920- The two pupils giving the best speeches were: Seniors – William Christison and Marion Sylvester. (NOTE: All English classes were required to give semester speeches – 5 minute talk.)
Travelers – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester; Music – Victrola Selections.

February 13, 1920- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester of this city has been chosen chairman of the Republican Women Organization of Wabasha County by the Republican Women State Executive Committee of Minneapolis. As county chairman, it will be her duty to interest the women of the county in Republican politics. She plans soon to appoint a chairman for each voting precinct in the county…
Last Friday morning the speakers of the various H. S. classes contested for the highest honors in oratory. The judges decided without debate that Marion Sylvester, senior, be given first place and Birdie Krause, junior, be given second.
E. L. Sylvester and Dr. J. P. Caldwell went to Rochester Thursday morning to spend the day.
The High School Philo Society program – Thursday February 26 – 8 PM.
1. Medley from the South Quartet – Ella Bolton, Vera Boehlke, Lola Hunter, & Marion Sylvester.
4. Reading "Jane" by Booth Tarkington – Marion Sylvester.

February 27, 1920- The Travelers, whilst primarily a study club, need occasional recreation and the most brilliant social event of the new year took place Monday evening February 23 when they entertained their husbands and guests at the beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester on Broadway.
Upwards of 90 were present but the spacious rooms of this perfectly appointed home accommodated all without the slightest degree of discomfort to anyone.
Artistically arranged potted plants, cut flowers, and the pretty gowns worn by the ladies gave the assemblage a distinctly festive appearance.
Guests arrived about 6 o’clock and were received by Mrs. T. J. Moore and enjoyed an hour of social merriment. Promptly at 7 o’clock the French doors leading to the dining room were thrown open by Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. Dinner was announced by Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck and the President, Mrs. B. F. Nichols, led the way.
The exquisite taste shown in the arrangement of the tables, the unique and efficient serving of good things, for with Travelers are justly famous reflected very creditably on the committee in charge, Mesdames Wichman, E. L. Sylvester, Moore, Bateman, Walker and Woodcock.

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(Program listed)
Victrola selections were enjoyed and it was near midnight before all wended their way homeward laud in praises of the Travelers as entertainers and Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester for their royal hospitality extended at this one of the most enjoyable parties in the history of the club. – contributed

March 19, 1920- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester spent last Saturday in Rochester and was accompanied home in the evening by her daughter, Miss Katherine, who spent Sunday at home.
Senior class play – "The Early Bird"
Rosa Bella Beavers, the Belle of Flogg Corners – Marion Sylvester.

March 26, 1920- County Republicans in Big Convention… 3 women, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Mrs. W. B. Webb of Wabasha and Mrs. W. B. Heagerty of Mazeppa will go to the Republican State Convention at St. Paul March 20…
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was called to Jamestown, N.D. the first of the week by the serious illness of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Holmes.

April 2, 1920- E. L. Sylvester, Dr. E. E. Smith, and Roscoe Schwanbeck left for Winona Thursday morning to attend the Maundy Thursday Banquet of the Scottish Rite Masons.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Saturday from her visit to Jamestown, N. D. and was accompanied home by her little granddaughter, who will visit for a time.

April 9, 1920- Edwin Sylvester Jr. returned to Minneapolis Monday afternoon to resume his studies at the State University.

April 23, 1920- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday morning to spend the day.
Mrs. R. J. Holmes and children of Jamestown, N. D. arrived last Saturday on a visit to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Miss Katherine Sylvester and friend of Rochester spent Sunday at the home of her parents.

April 30, 1920- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Tuesday afternoon for Eureka, Montana, being summoned there by the critical condition of her mother.

May 7, 1920- Republican County Convention name State Delegates – E. L. Sylvester, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…
Messrs and Mesdames E. L. Sylvester and G. A. Stoltz drove to Rochester Wednesday evening where they attended the lecture by ex-president Taft.

May 21, 1920- State Set for Commencement Week – 13 graduates
34th annual commencement Thursday May 27 – 8 o’clock.
Reading "Bobbie Shaftoe" – by Marion Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Thursday to attend the meeting of the Womens League of Voters.
Travelers club – Delegate to Kasson Convention… Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. Course study for coming year will be "Citizenship" and the magazine "The Woman Citizen" to be used as a guide.

May 28, 1920- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned Friday night from Eureka, Montana where they had been to attend the funeral of her mother. They were accompanied from Wabasha by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Foley who were returning from their wedding trip.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and son of Coleraine are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester this week.

June 11, 1920- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester is in attendance at the Republican National Convention being held in Chicago this week.

July 2, 1920- Republican Women County organization announced by Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, county chairman.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester who has been in attendance at the National Convention of the Federation of Women’s clubs at Des Moines, Iowa, returned home last Thursday

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morning.

July 9, 1920- Mesdames Reed Mills and G. F. Sylvester will entertain the Congregational Guild next Wednesday July 14 at the Sylvester home. Husbands of the ladies are invited.

July 23, 1920- E. L. Sylvester and peter Wood made a fine catch of pike at Camp Schmoker last Monday. It takes the old timers to lure the fish.

July 30, 1920- Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester last week.

August 13, 1920- Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent Sunday with her parents in the city.

August 20, 1920- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last Saturday from a weeks auto tour to Minneapolis, Duluth, and other northern Minnesota points.

September 3, 1920- The Plainview Shriners (NOTE: included – E. L. Sylvester) made a trip to Eau Claire, Wisconsin Saturday where they attended a big ceremonial. They report might poor roads through the sand.

September 10, 1920- Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Tues evening to act on the reception committee at the reception in honor of Mrs. Warren G. Harding, wife of the Republican Presidential nominee at the Curtis Hotel, Minneapolis, on Wednesday September 8.

October 1, 1920- Edwin Sylvester left for Minneapolis Tuesday to again enter the State University.
Miss Katherine Sylvester, who has been enjoying a weeks vacation at home, returned to Rochester Saturday to resume her work at the May Clinic.

October 8, 1920- Travelers – October 11 – Miss Mary Lahey
"Gleaning of the Republican Convention" – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

October 15, 1920- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester visited Rochester last Saturday.
Born to Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell Jr. 644 Marshall Ave. St. Paul, a son on Saturday October 9. We congratulate Grandpa and Grandma E. L. Sylvester. (NOTE: Chester Byrl. Chester will die from blood poisoning in his early teen years.)

November 5, 1920- Miss Katherine Sylvester came over from Rochester last Saturday and spent Sunday at the home of her parents.

November 12, 1920- The following Plainviewites left Thursday morning for the northern part of the state to enjoy a big game hunt: E. L. Sylvester, E. G. Krause, Curtis Slawson, John Allen, Will Gorrell, John Donaldson, and W. T. Lea… (NOTE: Deer hunting)

November 19, 1920- Edwin Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis last Saturday and spent Sunday at his home here.

November 26, 1920- The remainder of our deer hunters (NOTE: E. L. included) returned home Tuesday night each bringing a fine deer with him. This makes a total of 11 deer received in Plainview. In the latter party a large moose weighing 900 pounds was killed. When the party left for home there was a foot of snow on the ground in the northern part of the state.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left last week for Chicago and Port Byron Ill. on a few days visit to her daughters.

December 3, 1920- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, who has been spending a week with her daughters at Chicago and Port Byron, Ill. returned home Monday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a large party of friends at their home Monday evening. 500 and a splendid lunch was the pleasure of the evening.

December 10, 1920- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Monday afternoon as a delegate at large from the first district to attend the state convention of the League of Women Voters, held in the ballroom of the Curtis Court Hotel in that city.

December 17, 1920- The big game hunters, 9 in number, enjoyed an excellent game dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Wednesday evening. After enjoying

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the splendid feed the remainder of the evening was enjoyed in relating incidents of the hunt and all spent one of the most pleasantest evenings of the season.

December 24, 1920- Miss Marion Sylvester, who is attending Northwestern University, came home Saturday morning for the holiday vacation.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Marion, went to Rochester Thursday morning to visit Miss Katherine Sylvester and spend the day in the city.
The Ladies Circle of the GAR will meet with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester next Tuesday December 28. A picnic supper will be served.

December 31, 1920- Miss Katherine Sylvester was over from Rochester to spend Christmas at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

=== [ 1921 ] ===

January 7, 1921- Miss Katherine Sylvester returned to Rochester last Saturday afternoon after a short visit at home.
Edwin Sylvester Jr. returned to Minneapolis last Saturday afternoon to resume his studies at the State University.
Miss Marion Sylvester departed Saturday for Chicago where she will again take up her studies at Northwestern University.

January 14, 1921- Local Lady Attends Legislature Session – Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester, chairman of the First District Minnesota League of Women Voters, left for Minneapolis Tuesday afternoon to attend an executive board meeting which was called for 10:300 AM Wednesday morning. The entire board will attend the legislative session on Thursday.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester very pleasantly entertained a large company of lady friends last Thursday at a noonday luncheon. The afternoon was spent at progressive "500" and that gathering proved a most enjoyable affair.
Dr. E. E. Smith and G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday afternoon to attend the Shrine Club’s complimentary dinner in honor of Nobel G. Staar Judd, recently elected representative of Osman Temple to the Imperial Council.

January 21, 1921- Officers installed for Woodmen… Clerk G. F. Sylvester. At the conclusion of the work a fine supper was served by the ladies and the remainder of the evening was enjoyed at games and in a pleasant social manner.

January 28, 1921- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Monday afternoon for Minneapolis where she will attend the University Short course in Citizenship for Woman Voters, which is being held during the week.

February 4, 1921- Miss Katherine Sylvester came over from Rochester the last of the week and spent Sunday at the home of her parents.

February 11, 1921- Women Organize Legion Auxiliary – A meet of the ladies who had sons, husbands or brothers who are members of William Allen Post of the American Legion, was called to order by Post Commander Askew Saturday afternoon February 5 for the purpose of organizing a women’s auxiliary of the American Legion… Officers elected – Mrs. Hettie Sylvester, President. (NOTE: American Legion rooms over F. J. Cornwell store. ALSO: When the original Legion was organized, Mrs. Sylvester wanted it named after her son Byrl, but the Legion voted to name it after the first Plainview fallen soldier, William Allen.)
Messrs and Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and E. W. Schwanbeck left Wednesday afternoon for Minneapolis to attend the auto show and spend a few days with relatives and friends.

February 25, 1921- Old Settlers met Wednesday. E. L. Sylvester Secretary.
The City hall was the scene of an exceptionally pretty function last Monday evening, when the members of the Travelers Club with their husbands and gentlemen friends assembled for "Guest night," the premier social event of the club year.

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About 70 were present. The hall was completely transformed by means of numerous easy chairs, floor lamps, rugs, plants, etc., giving it a cozy home appearance. (NOTE: Baked ham dinner at 7 and program following).

March 4, 1921- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester went to Rochester Thursday afternoon on a short visit to her daughter, Miss Katherine.

March 11, 1921- E. L. Sylvester left for Rochester Wednesday afternoon to be present at the operation of her son, Edwin Jr.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Tuesday morning to meet her son, Edwin of Minneapolis, who was to undergo an operation for appendicitis. He had suffered the third attack from the affliction and an operation was imperative.

March 25, 1921- Edwin Sylvester Jr. was able to return home from the hospital Saturday afternoon. He has made a quick recovery from his operation and is feeling fine.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester last Friday on a visit to her son, Edwin.
H. D. Smith, E. L. Sylvester, and Dr. E. E. Smith left for Winona Thursday morning to attend the Maundy-Thursday banquet of the Scottish Rite masons.

April 1, 1921- Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent Easter Sunday at home, returning Monday morning.

April 22, 1921- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for St. Paul last Friday afternoon where he attended a meeting of life insurance agents.

April 29, 1921- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Thursday to spend a few days and while there attend the White Shrine meeting.

May 6, 1921- Mrs. Meta Holmes came down from Minneapolis Wednesday to spend a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

May 13, 1921- Mesdames E. W. Schwanbeck, and G. F. Sylvester left Tuesday morning for Albert Lea to attend the district meeting of the Women’s Federation of Clubs.
E. L. Sylvester, Mesdames C. L. Waterman, and E. J. Thurman left for St. Paul Tuesday to attend the Eastern Star Grand Chapter, the latter two delegates from the local lodge.

June 3, 1921- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell came down from St. Paul last week on a visit to her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

June 10, 1921- Miss Katherine Sylvester came over from Rochester Saturday afternoon to spend Sunday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

June 17, 1921- Miss Marion Sylvester who has been attending Northwestern University returned home the first of the week for the summer vacation. She joined her parents Monday on a trip to the big Shrine meeting at Des Moines, Iowa.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Glenn Mack, and Roscoe Schwanbeck drove to Rochester Monday where they joined a party of Shriners on their trip to Des Moines, Iowa to attend the Imperial gathering.

June 24, 1921- The Shriners who attended the Imperial meeting at Des Moines last week returned home Friday morning. They report a jolly time and a great entertainment but all were pretty tired from the several days of strenuous life during the hot weather, and it sure was warm in Des Moines.

July 1, 1921- Mesdames G. F. Sylvester, Matt Schilling, and Henry Limekoul will entertain the Congregational Guild at the home of Mrs. Sylvester next Wednesday afternoon. Gentlemen are invited to lunch.

July 22, 1921- We have all known for sometime that E. L. Sylvester is some fisherman, but recently he pulled one that caps them all. It is said that while fishing at Pugh’s Point recently, he landed 2 fish – a bass and a pickerel – at the same time on an artificial minnow. If it were not that we considered Edwin truthful, even when telling a fish story, and that the statement is verified by T. A. Askew, we might suspect that someone had put up a job on him. However, this is the real fact and we must consider the statement

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correct until proven otherwise.

August 5, 1921- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester drove to Winona last Thursday where they enjoyed the Banker’s excursion to Trempealeau, Wisconsin.
At the Convention of the Women’s Auxiliary of the American Legion held in Winona this week, some of our Plainview ladies were again selected for important offices in the district. Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was elected President of the district and Mrs. M. V. Foley was selected as secretary. Mrs. Sylvester was also made chairman of the finance committee. The Plainview unit is indeed proud of this honored distinction.

August 19, 1921- Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent a few days at home last week.

August 26, 1921- Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and children of St. Paul who have been visiting a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, returned home Sunday.

September 23, 1921- Fair winners – Baby Sunflower – 1st Marion Sylvester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, chairman of the League of Women Voters in the First Congressional District, has been named to membership on the nominating committee of the League which has been called for next month in Minneapolis…
Edwin Sylvester Jr. left Monday for the State University to take up his studies at the fall term opening on Wednesday.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned from St. Paul Sunday evening where she spent the week with her daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell, Jr.
Miss Marion Sylvester left for Evanston, Ill. last Sunday evening where she will resume her studies at Northwestern University.

October 7, 1921- The Ladies Union of the Christian Church will meet at the home of Mrs. E. L. Sylvester Wednesday October 12, at 3 PM.

October 21, 1921- Today’s Minneapolis Journal carried on its front page a cut of a group of prominent women who are attending the meeting of the Minnesota League of Women Voters, among whom was Mrs. E. L. Sylvester of this city.

November 4, 1921- E. L. Sylvester and E. G. Krause have all made arrangements to leave Monday or Tuesday for the northern woods to hunt big game. While the present weather is not the best for big game hunting, they expect by the time they reach their location, conditions will be more favorable. So far they are the only two who have made positive plans for the hunt, but there are others who are seriously contemplating making the trip and when the time comes to leave may join the party.

November 10, 1921- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Wednesday evening for Minneapolis to be present at a board meeting for the State League of Women Voters to be held Thursday at 10 o’clock.
Travelers Club – Mrs. A. E. Becker
"Disarmament" – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

November 25, 1921- E. L. Sylvester and E. G. Krause returned Sunday evening from their hunting expedition in the northern woods, bringing a fine buck as a trophy. They made the trip in a Ford car and never experienced the least delay. This little car never missed a stroke on the entire trip.
Most of the way they found wonderful roads. The poorest road found on the entire journey was the Rochester road between Elgin and Doty. The roads in the northern part of the state are simply fine, they state. On their return trip, making a stretch of 94 miles into the Cities, they made the run in less than 3 hours, while from the Cities home it required over 6 hours, the roads being more slippery.
They took a camping outfit with them and never spent a night under a roof, but remained in their tent. Whenever night overtook them, they set up their camp and report it a great life.

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December 2, 1921- First year of Women’s Auxiliary of American Legion proves successful.
Article – Any donations will be gladly received. Miss Hettie Dillon Sylvester, President. Mrs. Katherine Leonard Foley, Secretary.
Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. spent Thanksgiving at home. He was accompanied by J. H. Hoffman his roommate at the University.
Meta Sylvester Holmes came down from Minneapolis last Wednesday evening and remained over Thanksgiving with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester have entertained friends at a series of parties the past week.

December 23, 1921- Miss Marion Sylvester came home from Evanston, Ill. Sunday to spend her vacation.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Marion, left for the Cities on Thursday morning on a short visit.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and family plan to spend their Christmas with friends in Rochester, their daughter, Miss Katherine of Chicago will join them.

=== [ 1922 ] ===

January 6, 1922- Annual meeting of Congregational Church – Clerk G. F. Sylvester.
Miss Marion Sylvester, who has been enjoying the holiday vacation at home, left Sunday for Evanston, Ill. to resume her studies.
G. F. Sylvester, who is local agent for the N.Y. Life Insurance Company, received a draft on Thursday for $10,000 payment on the death claim of William Yandon. This is one of the first double indemnity policies written by Mr. Sylvester and the prompt returns are indeed commendable.

January 27, 1922- Travelers met at Mrs. Warren Woodcock last Monday evening… Mrs. G. F. Sylvester reviewed the lives of Burrows, Burbank, and Muir…

February 3, 1922- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and grandchildren spent Saturday in Rochester.

February 10, 1922- Old Settlers Meeting – 46th annual. E. L. Sylvester, secretary.
E. L. Sylvester, J. H. Eggers Jr., Albert Eggers and Will Sell enjoyed a fishing trip to Pugh’s Point last Saturday and were fortunate in securing a nice mess of the finny tribe. They plan to go to the river again in a few days to enjoy the sport.

February 24, 1922- Annual Travelers Club Banquet in City Hall February 20.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained at "Bridge" Saturday evening.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck left for the Cities Tuesday morning where they will attend the annual meeting and banquet of the Women’s Federation of Clubs.

March 10, 1922- A gay crowd gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Wednesday evening at 6 o’clock. They came with a fine picnic dinner to help Mrs. Sylvester celebrate her birthday. The evening will long be remembered as an exceedingly happy event.

March 17, 1922- G. F. Sylvester made a business trip to Rochester Saturday.
Park Sylvester went to Rochester Saturday returning home Monday morning.
J. H. Eggers and E. L. Sylvester made an auto trip to Pugh’s Point Sunday, starting on the return trip after about an hour spent at the river and reaching as far as Indian Creek where the river had raised to such a height it was impossible to cross. They were compelled to remain at a farm house until Monday morning when they returned home.

March 24, 1922- Republican County Convention convenes in Wabasha Saturday – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…

March 31, 1922- Edwin Sylvester Jr., who has been spending a few days at home,


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returned to Minneapolis Tuesday to resume his studies at the state "U."
G. F. Sylvester went to Chicago Saturday to spend a week. While there he visited his daughters Marion and Katherine.
E. L. Sylvester disposed of the William J. Karsten 160 acre farm in Elgin Township to Edward Karsten.

April 7, 1922- Teacher’s Club at home of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Friday evening. A very dainty midnight lunch was served and April Fools jokes participated in. Some of the jokes being unusually clever, yet all went home happy in spite of the fact they had been the cause of mirth. All were loud in their praises of the entertainers who certainly know how to celebrate the coming in of April first.
A large number of Plainview Rebekas left Wednesday morning for Winona to attend the district meeting of the order. (NOTE: 20 from Plainview including E. L. Sylvester.)

April 14, 1922- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Friday morning for Chicago where she will visit a few days and then go to Moline Ill. to visit at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. R. Baker. She will be accompanied from Chicago by her daughter Miss Marion.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Chicago (NOTE: meant Chatfield) Tuesday afternoon on a visit to friends.
Park Sylvester left Monday morning for Farmersburg, Iowa where he has accepted a position with a road crew. He will have charge of a grading crew during the summer.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Chatfield Tuesday where she assisted in organizing an Auxiliary of the American Legion, returning home Wednesday.
E. L. Sylvester left for Winona on Thursday afternoon to attend the Maundy-Thursday Banquet of the Scottish Rite Masons.

April 21, 1922- Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester of this city, is a delegate to the Pan-American Conference and National League of Women Voters, from the First District. The appointment was made this week by Congressman Anderson and shows an appreciation for the work done by Mrs. Sylvester during the past few years.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned Wednesday from her visit to her daughters at Chicago and Moline, Ill.
G. F. Sylvester is arranging to install the first radio phone in the city. He will place the apparatus in his home and expects to derive much pleasure by listening in for special news and musical concerts.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester departed Tuesday evening and met the State Delegation at Chicago. From there they will travel over the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to their destination.

May 5, 1922- Travelers Club – Mrs. F. A. Taylor
Officers… Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, sec.
Delegate for District Convention at Austin – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester is on the convention program for a short talk on Art.

May 12, 1922- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last Friday from the East where she had been in attendance at a conference of the League of Women Voters. Mrs. Sylvester reports a wonderful trip both in pleasure and valued information. While in the East she had the pleasure of being a dinner guest of Senator F. B. Kellogg and also spent time with Congressman Anderson in Washington.

May 19, 1922- Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. spent Sunday at home, returning to the University on Monday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck and Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester drove to Winona Sunday where they attended the recital given by Geraldine Farrar in the

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afternoon.
E. L. Sylvester can doubtless claim the first catch of Pike of any Plainview fisherman, for on Monday he landed a nice one at Pugh’s Point with "Jakie" Eggers daredevil bait.
E. L. Sylvester went to Wabasha Friday afternoon.

May 26, 1922- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell Jr. and two sons Phaon Jr. and Chester Byrl arrived from St. Paul Sunday to spend the next 2 weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.
Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester spent last Thursday in Lake City making final arrangements for the First District Convention Auxiliary of the American Legion to be held there June 4-5-6.
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and Mrs. I. W. Finch, drove to Winona Sunday evening to the Central Methodist Church to attend the last of the services of organ programs by the Quartet and Arthur P. Thompson, an artist on a wonderful instrument.

June 2, 1922- Legion Convention at Lake City to be great event… Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester attended the Schuman – Heinck concert in Rochester last Thursday evening. Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Jones accompanied them.

June 9, 1922- Park Sylvester, who has been supervising road work near McGreger, Iowa, for the past few months has completed his work and returned home last week. He has again taken work with the Ploof road crew.

June 23, 1922- Edwin L. Sylvester spent a few days at home this week, returning to Minneapolis where he will take the summer course at the University.
Miss Marion Sylvester returned home from Evanston, Ill. where she has been attending school, Tuesday morning for the summer vacation.

June 30, 1922- Mrs. Meta Holmes and son of Minneapolis spent last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

July 7, 1922- Miss Katherine Sylvester, accompanied by her friend Miss Eleanor Frye and parents came over from Rochester Sunday and spent the day at the G. F. Sylvester home. Miss Katherine is having a vacation from her duties in Chicago and will spend most of the time with the Frey’s on an auto trip through northern Wisconsin.

July 14, 1922- Edwin Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis and spent Sunday with his parents, driving his Ford back Sunday.

July 21, 1922- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Manchester attended the Bankers excursion from Winona to LaCrosse on Tuesday evening.
Miss Katherine Sylvester is spending a few days at her home this week. Miss Florence Frey of Rochester is her guest.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mr. and Mrs. Reed Milles, and Miss Florence Frey attended the Bankers excursion from Winona to LaCrosse Tuesday evening.
G. F. Sylvester has installed a new and larger radio instrument on Wednesday morning, listening in on Minneapolis markets, reports on the strike situation and other important news matters, getting it perfectly clear. He states that the new instrument certainly works fine and he is highly pleased with the results and expects to take much enjoyment with his new apparatus.
The Misses Marion Sylvester, Ella Bolton, and Elizabeth Mack went to Winona on the excursion out of Wabasha last Thursday to visit Miss Lucy Duerre at the state teachers college. They all returned Friday evening.

August 4, 1922- G. F. Sylvester and family drove to Rochester Sunday evening to attend the band concert.

August 11, 1922- The Misses Marion Sylvester, Ella Bolton, and Elizabeth Mack went to West Newton Tuesday afternoon for a swim, returning early in the evening.

August 18, 1922- George F. Sylvester reported that he caught Atlanta, Georgia

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Tuesday night and enjoyed a fine program. His radio instrument worked perfectly and was clear as a bell.

August 25, 1922- Miss Marion Sylvester left last Friday for Waterloo, Iowa on a few days visit to friends.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Saturday morning on an auto trip to St. Cloud and other Minnesota towns on a several days visit to relatives and friends.

September 8, 1922- Edwin Sylvester came down from Minneapolis last week on a few days visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

September 15, 1922- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul Tuesday to attend a state board meeting of the League of Women Voters to lay plans for the state convention which is to be held in St. Paul in October.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to St. Paul last Friday where they attended the funeral of J. P. Caldwell Sr. of St. Paul.

September 22, 1922- Fair results – Baby sunflower – Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, first.

September 29, 1922- Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. left for Minneapolis last Saturday noon for the fall quarter at the U which opened this week.
Mrs. A. S. Kennedy and Miss Mynn VanHorn entertained a large number of ladies Saturday evening at a bridge dinner. There were eight tables prettily arranged and a delicious dinner served at 6:30. Mrs. G. F. Sylvester won the high score prize and Mrs. W. Woodcock the consolation prize.

October 27, 1922- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, one of the First District delegates at the American legion and Auxiliary convention at New Orleans, returned home Tuesday. She left the special train at Owatonna and returned home by auto bus route. She reports a wonderful trip, with many sights and interesting incidents throughout the journey, while the trip was one of a great deal of pleasure, there was much hard work and she states that it seems might good to get back to Minnesota, the best state in the Union.

November 10, 1922- The party of deer hunters composed of E. L. Sylvester, E. G. Krause, Park Sylvester, and Arthur Wempner left Sunday morning by auto for the northern part of the state where they will spend the next several days hunting big game. The season opens on the 10th, but thy made the trip north at this early date to get their camp located and everything ready for the opening day.

November 17, 1922- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester is entertaining this evening at a 5 o’clock dinner in honor of Mrs. Effie Wedge.

November 24, 1922- The party of hunters composed of E. L. Sylvester, E. G. Krause, Park Sylvester, and Arthur Wempner, returned from the northern part of the state last week bringing with them four fine deer as trophies of their hunt. On the opening day they secured their first deer and a few days later they secured the other three in one days hunt. The trip was a hard one but they returned by a different route and found much better roads.

December 1, 1922- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester entertained a company of friends at a 6 o’clock dinner last Friday evening.

December 8, 1922- Edwin Sylvester Jr. was down from Minneapolis to spend Thanksgiving at home.

December 29, 1922- Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. has been selected manager of swimming at the University for the next year. Student managers for major sports were selected as a result of competition under a system instituted by Mr. Leuhry, director of athletics last year…
Miss Marion Sylvester is home from Northwestern University at Evanston, Ill. to spend Christmas vacation.
Edwin Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis Friday evening to spend the Christmas vacation at home.

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Miss Catherine Sylvester of Chicago, who has been spending a few days with friends in Rochester, arrived home Wednesday to spend a portion of the holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

=== [ 1923 ] ===

January 5, 1923- Miss Marion Sylvester returned to her school duties at Northwestern University Tuesday evening.
The Murray Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Mrs. L. E. Ryan Wednesday evening January 10… "Trip to New Orleans" – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

February 9, 1923- Old Settlers Met February 7, Opera House… E. L. Sylvester reelected Secretary.
Mrs. A. P. Stafford arrived here last Saturday, being called here by the death of her father, John Horn.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Monday to attend the State Speakers Bureau for the Republican Party held in Minneapolis this week.

March 2, 1923- E. L. Sylvester not only reports that he speared a 15 pound pickerel last Sunday, but also claims the record for the largest fish during the spearing season.
A crew of men from town went out last Thursday and Friday and opened up the Beaver road so that it could be traveled by car. It was reported that E. L. Sylvester used the $25 he won at the drawing last Thursday for this purpose so he could get to his cottage at Pugh’s Point to go fishing. At least he went down to the river Saturday night.

March 9, 1923- Prize winner drawn last week… E. L. Sylvester.

March 16, 1923- Election on Tuesday a Quiet Affair – Village offices… E. L. Sylvester, Treasurer…

March 30, 1923- E. L. Sylvester left for Winona on Thursday morning to attend the Maundy Thursday Banquet at the Scottish Rite Session last evening.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Friday on a visit to her daughter, Miss Katherine at Chicago, Miss Marion at Evanston, Ill. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker at Port Huron, Ill.

April 6, 1923- Edwin Sylvester and Alfred Burkhardt, University students, are spending their spring vacation at their homes here this week.
Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. left Monday for the State University after spending his vacation at home.
Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned on Thursday from several days visit to her daughters at various points in Illinois.

April 13, 1923- The social meeting of the Ladies Circle G.A.R. will be with Mrs. G. F. Sylvester Tuesday afternoon April 17.

May 4, 1923- Mesdames G. F. Sylvester and G. A. Walker entertained a number of lady friends at "Bridge" at the home of the former on Tuesday evening.
E. L. Sylvester and Geo F. Sylvester left for St. Paul Thursday afternoon having been called there by news that their sister, Mrs. Nellie Dyer had suffered a stroke of paralysis.

June 29, 1923- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester spent Tuesday in Rochester.
Mrs. E. L. Sylvester was called to St. Paul to a State Central Committee meeting for the G.O.P. to plan the campaign of Gov. Preus for U.S. Senator on Friday.
Edwin L. Sylvester, who recently returned from school at the University, left this week for France. With a school friend he will accompany a stock train to New Jersey. From there they will work their way on a steamer to France. They will spend some time touring that country and expect to work their way back.

July 6, 1923- (Three column adv. For J.A.O., Preus for U.S. Senator.)

July 13, 1923- Gov. J.A.O. Preus, Republican candidate for the office of U.S. Senator at a special election to be held next Monday July 16, will deliver an address in Plainview

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this Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock…
(Oronoco Bank is closed: shortage discovered.)

August 23, 1923- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Wednesday on an auto trip to Northern Minnesota.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned last Saturday night from an extended auto trip to Northern Michigan and Wisconsin. They report everything suffering from the dry weather.
Miss Marion Sylvester left Sunday for the Cities to spend a few days and will join her parents on their auto trip through the northern part of the state.

August 24, 1923- Message from Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. states that he sailed the first of last week for the United States and expects to arrive home about the 30th of this month.

September 7, 1923- Miss Katherine Sylvester, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, returned to her work in Chicago Tuesday.
Edwin Sylvester, who has spent the summer in France, returned home Sunday. With a University chum he worked his way over and back. On their return trip they pinned Minneapolis and St. Paul signs on their back and started out to hike. Passing motorists gave them lifts and they rode nearly all the way.

September 21, 1923- Miss Marion Sylvester left for Evanston, Ill. Tuesday afternoon to resume her studies at Northwestern University.

September 28, 1932- Edwin Sylvester Jr. returned to the State University last Saturday where he is a senior.
Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester left for Rochester Thursday to attend a district meeting of the American Legion Auxiliary.

October 19, 1923- M. J. Manchester and G. F. Sylvester left by car Wednesday morning for Milwaukee, Wisconsin where the former will attend to business matters and the latter will visit his daughters, Katherine and Marion at Chicago and Evanston.

November 9, 1923- Mrs. Ethel Nunamaker and Mr. Park Sylvester were united in marriage at Rochester last Wednesday morning. The couple were unattended and after the ceremony they left for Red Wing where they visited relatives until Friday when they returned to this city where they will make their home in the R. W. Chapman residence on West Broadway. Their many friends wish them happiness.

November 16, 1923- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester entertained a party of ladies at a bridge party Tuesday evening.

November 23, 1932- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and grandchildren Hettie and John Holmes drove to Minneapolis last Friday afternoon where they visited their daughter, Mrs. Meta Holmes and their son, Edwin. They also attended the football game Saturday between Minnesota and Iowa and said that it was one of the most thrilling games they have ever seen.

December 14, 1923- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Plainview Club Woman, was yesterday elected one of the vice presidents of the Republican Volunteer League of Minnesota, a new Republican organization formed with the object of "saving" the G.O.P. in this state…
The Ladies Union will meet with Mrs. P. D. Sylvester Wednesday afternoon December 19. A good attendance is desired as there will be special business.

December 28, 1932- Miss Marion Sylvester who attends Northwestern University at Evanston, Ill. returned home Friday to spend the holiday vacation.
Edwin Sylvester, Chas. Slocumb, Alfred Burchardt, and Herbert Schwantz, students at Minnesota University, returned home Friday for the holiday vacation.

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=== [ 1924 ] ===

January 4, 1924- Edwin Sylvester returned to his school duties at the university Sunday, after a weeks vacation at home.
Miss Marion Sylvester returned to her school work at Evanston, Ill. Wednesday after spending her vacation at home.

January 25, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Friday morning for Minneapolis where she will attend a meeting of the State Central Committee of the G.O.P. on Saturday.

February 8, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left for St. Paul Saturday where they attended the funeral of a friend returning home Sunday.

February 22, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left Thursday morning for St. Paul where she will attend the mid-winter meeting of the Federation of Women’s Clubs. She will attend a meeting at the Coolidge headquarters.

March 7, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Thursday to attend the district Republican convention held there on Friday.

March 28, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left on Friday morning for Winona to attend the Institute of Government and Politics under the auspices of the Winona Teachers College and the Winona League of Women Voters held in that city today and tomorrow.

April 11, 1924- Miss Katherine Sylvester arrived here Wednesday from Chicago on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester. She drove through in a car.

April 25, 1924- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester returned last week from a brief visit to her daughter, Miss Marion at Chicago.

May 2, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester named district Vice President of Rebekah’s Lodge…

May 16, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester returned Monday after spending Saturday at the Mother’s Day program at the State University.

May 23, 1924- Mrs. E. L. Sylvester went to Rochester Wednesday to attend a candidates meeting of the first District Republican organization.

June 20, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left on Tuesday evening for Minneapolis where the attended the University commencement, their son, Edwin Jr. taking part in the exercise.
Miss Marion Sylvester returned from Evanston, Ill. where she has completed her music course, on Tuesday.

June 27, 1924- Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. returned to Minneapolis Sunday evening to commence his new duties.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell and two sons came down from St. Paul last Saturday to spend some time at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. Mrs. Caldwell assisted her mother as hostess at the Rose Shower given in honor of Miss Dorothy Parker on Monday afternoon. (NOTE: Dorothy Slocumb Parker.)

July 4, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Marion, went to the State Park on Sunday where they met Miss Katherine Sylvester and the Fryes of Rochester and enjoyed a picnic. (NOTE: Today it is Whitewater State Park near Elba, Minnesota.)

July 18, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter Miss Marion returned from their trip to Moline, Ill. Wednesday.

July 25, 1924- Millville Community Club – a delightful program was furnished by Miss Elsie Glaesmer and Marion Sylvester of Plainview and Misses Schleicher and Sommers of Millville.

August 1, 1924- Misses Marion and Katherine Sylvester spent a few days last week with relatives and friends in the Cities.
Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester spent a few days last week at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester.

August 8, 1924- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester will entertain the Congregational Church Guild Wednesday afternoon August 13 assisted by Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck. Husbands are

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invited. Adv.

August 29, 1924- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of St. Paul is spending the week with her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester in the city.

September 5, 1924- Miss Marion Sylvester left the first of the week for Salt Lake City, Utah where she has been engaged as music instructor in a college there.

September 19, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester motored to St. Paul Sunday to attend the National Convention of the American Legion where Mrs. Sylvester was in the receiving line for the Gold Star Mothers at the State Capital on Monday.

September 26, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester and Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Manchester motored to Rochester yesterday morning where they heard the address by Gen. Chas. G. Dawes.

November 7, 1924- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester very pleasantly entertained the members of the Bridge Club at her home on West Broadway Friday evening. The affair was in the order of a costume party. Refreshments were served before the departure of the guests of their respective homes.

November 28, 1924- Edwin Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis Wednesday evening to spend Thanksgiving with his parents. He is now employed by the Washburn Crosby Co. in the Chamber of Commerce Building.

December 5, 1924- Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester, Mrs. William Millin and Miss Margaret Apple were Rochester visitors Wednesday.

December 12, 1924- American Legion Auxiliary election… Publicity – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Executive Committee – Mrs. E. L. Sylvester…

=== [ 1925 ] ===

January 2, 1925- Mrs. J. P. Caldwell Jr. spent the week end at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester.

January 9, 1925- John and Hettie Holmes, who have been making their home with their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, spent Christmas at the home of their mother in Minneapolis. They are now making their home with their mother and have begun their school work there.

January 30, 1925- E. L. Sylvester, T. A. Askew, Sr., Park Sylvester, and Harmon Herron went down to Pugh’s Point Saturday evening on a fishing trip. Mr. Sylvester returned home Sunday afternoon but the others remained until Tuesday. Their luck was none too good as the thickness of the ice made it hard to locate their shacks.

February 13, 1925- Izaak Walton League now assured – 15 members… Park Sylvester, E. L. Sylvester…

February 20, 1925- Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Sylvester left for Minneapolis Saturday afternoon on a short visit to relatives.

March 4, 1925- clipping
Plainview State Banks is Closed
Bank Officers Call in State Banking Dept.: Lack of Reserve is Cause
The Plainview State Bank of Plainview, 25 miles northeast of Rochester, failed to pen its doors for business today and a state bank examiner is in charge of the affairs of the bank.
No reason for the closing was given out today but it is presumed lack of reserve forced the closing.
According to word received here today, directors and officers closed the bank voluntarily and called in the state examiner who arrived at Plainview this morning.
E. L. Sylvester is president, G. F. Sylvester, cashier; A. S. Kennedy, formerly of Rochester, assistant cashier and G. A. Stoltz, assistant cashier.
While the stock holders may lose heavily, depositors will not sustain much if any

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loss it is believed. (NOTE: This observation would not hold true.)
The closing is the result of serving its community too well in its generousness to borrowers and taking upon itself to a great degree the troubles of others, it was expressed in banking circles today.
The capital of the bank is $30,000 and surplus a like amount, according to published statements. The deposits in the Plainview State bank aggregate approximately $700,000.

March 6, 1925- State Bank Closes on Thursday.
State Bank Doors Close on Tuesday
Voluntary Action By Officers Cause of Business Suspension
City’s Oldest Financial Institution Taken Over By State Examiner
Talk of Reorganizing But Nothing Definite Can Be Assured
The Plainview State Bank was closed Wednesday morning by the voluntary action of the officers of the bank. On Tuesday when the decision was made the state banking department was informed and the next morning members of the department were here to take charge of affairs. Members of the banking department who are taking charge of the bank are John G. Schultz, Jr., E. A. Highum, and A. A. Sorenson. News of the closing did not spread until that morning and during the rest of the day there was considerable discussion all about town. There were many long faces, and yet there was very little excitement. Everyone seemed to feel that there were others more seriously effected than themselves.
The Plainview State Bank is one of the oldest institutions in this section of the state and has always been considered one of the strongest. In their quarterly statement made in January was over $850,000, including about $700,000 in deposits. This was the lowest that their totals have been in years. Post war conditions brought on an impossibility of realizing profits from property which was held as security and the property replaced the loan. The bank has been under a heavy strain for the past few years but superhuman efforts of its officers during the past few months has made its condition look the most favorable for some time and it was thought by many that they were past the crises.
In their efforts to clear their accounts the officers who are stockholders have put in every bit of their personal resources. It is expected that they will suffer a complete loss. How the depositor will fare will not be determined for some time and will likely be years before the whole situation is cleared up, but it is expected that eventually a satisfactory settlement will be made. It will perhaps be a month before statements of any definiteness can be made.
There is talk of reorganization, but nothing can be done until a definite statement can be given of the present situation. E. L. Sylvester, president of the bank, left Saturday from the Cities and has not returned or been heard from since.
Mrs. J. P. Caldwell, Mrs. Meta Holmes, and Edwin Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis Monday and spent a few days with their mother.

March 9, 1925- Rochester Daily Bulletin
Sylvester Missing; Plainview Bank Head, Embezzled $45,000, is Charged
Warrant is Issued for His Arrest
John Foley, Wabasha County Attorney, Issues and Signs Warrant
Authorities Will Hunt for Banker
Family Can Give no Hint of Whereabouts; Speculation Will Total High
Plainview, Minn. March 9 – E. L. Sylvester, president of the Plainview State Bank, was charged with embezzlement of $1,650 in a warrant issued here today by John Foley, Wabasha County Attorney. The alleged defalcation probably will run much higher, Mr. Foley said.

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"While the specific charge is embezzlement of $1,650 on May 31, 1924, I have no idea how much the total amount will run," Mr. Foley said. "I consulted with bank examiners but they are unable to tell shat the loss will be. The examination is being continued today.
"I conferred with Mrs. Sylvester this morning to see what she could tell as to Mr. Sylvester’s whereabouts. Her daughter, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of St. Paul was with her and they both seemed to be laboring under considerable nervous strain. They were kind and courteous to me however, and told me what they knew about Sylvester’s movements since he disappeared February 28th," Mr. Foley said.

May Reach $45,000
The county attorney also questioned George Sylvester, brother of the missing president, as to the movement of the president prior to his disappearance.
"I have found no trace of Mr. Sylvester, other than that he is said to have been traced to Chicago," Mr. Foley said.
The county attorney was accompanied in Plainview by a deputy sheriff from Wabasha. The defalcation may run over $45,000 it was unofficially reported today. George Sylvester, brother of E. L. Sylvester, President of the Plainview Bank, declined to comment on the case.
"I do not know where my brother is," he said. "I have not heard from him since he left a week ago Saturday. I have nothing to say about the matter." George Sylvester is cashier of the bank.
Traced to Chicago
When Mr. Sylvester left home February 28th, he also left traces which enabled relatives and officials to check his trip as far as Chicago. There the trail was lost.
Sunday Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, his wife, announced that no effort would be made by members of the family to find him. The family is satisfied that he is alive. Shortly after Mr. Sylvester’s disappearance, his brother, George, said the bank president "had been despondent of late about the bank affairs."

March 13, 1925-
Whereabouts of Missing Banker Still Unknown.
Nation-Wide Search for E. L. Sylvester, President, Continues.
State Dept. Opens Doors of Bank Tuesday for Benefit of Patrons
Shortage, According to Examiner in charge, May Reach $100,000
The Plainview State Bank opened its doors Wednesday morning in charge of the state banking department for the benefit of the bank’s patrons. C. L. Mikkelson, assistant deputy examiner, is in charge and will remain here indefinitely. John G. Schultz, head examiner, will remain for a few weeks to assist in the rush of giving out papers and securing further information. The examiners are interviewing patrons in gaining information regarding the bank’s relations with its customers and answering the many questions asked. The examiners finished listing the bank’s properties Tuesday and have taken their papers to the department headquarters for summarizing.
The first irregularity was reported to the state department on Saturday afternoon. Previous to that all reports had been favorable. A. S. Kennedy was called to St. Paul for a conference following which A. J. Viegel, State bank superintendent, asked County Attorney John R. Foley for a warrant for the arrest of E. L. Sylvester, charging embezzlement of $1,650.
Mr. Viegel at that time said that shortages of $45,000 had been found and later stated that the figure might reach $100,000. He also stated that more warrants would be issued when conditions were more definitely known.
"Some one in the bank has been listing paid mortgages and notes as live assets," Mr. Viegel said, "made possible by the carelessness of patrons, who left to the bank the cancellation of their obligations." Included also in the bank’s assets were papers belonging to estates the handling of which was left to the bank.

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Information regarding the true situation of the bank is hard to get here as the examiners are strictly forbidden from making any statements. Their reports go into the state department where very little is given out. The topic is under discussion continually all through the community. There is considerable speculation in opinions and new stories are constantly appearing. The bank however still holds the confidence of many of its old patrons, many of whom have said that if the bank were to open again under the same management they would gladly entrust all their business to them.
County Attorney John R. Foley and Deputy Sheriff John Jacobs were here Monday with a warrant. They interviewed members of Mr. Sylvester’s family and friends but none had the least idea of his whereabouts. Mr. Foley carried his investigations to St. Paul Monday afternoon where he perfected plans for a nation wide search. He would not disclose his methods but his and the sheriff’s office were very busy Tuesday in carrying them out. A large number of photographs have been ordered for distribution.
Mr. Sylvester is one of the oldest residents of this community. He is well liked and had always been one of our most prominent and respected citizens. He was born on a farm near here. Previous to his entrance into the bank in 1882 he taught school for a few years. By hard and faithful work he gradually improved his standing until in 1905 he was elected president of the bank with which he has been connected for forty-three years. He is at present sixty-six years old.
Miss Katherine Sylvester of Rochester visited at the home of her parents Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester over the weekend.

March 20, 1925-
Defalcations Extend over Many Years
Evidence of Old Irregularities Uncovered by Examining Papers
Trace of Absconding Banker Fruitless After His Long Absence
Wabasha County Officials Using Effort to Locate Missing President
The conditions of the affairs of the Plainview State Bank are still a mater of speculative opinion. The state bank department has made no further statements except that the shortage has gone over $50,000. The general impression here is that it will take some time to get a definite statement of condition and that it will take several years to straighten out affairs.
The handling of mortgages is causing some of the greatest confusion. In one instance there are three mortgages on the same property and each was thought by the holder to be a first mortgage. In another instance a $2,200 mortgage has been issued eighteen years ago and final payment was made eleven years ago. Following the closing of the bank this mortgage showed up in the possession of a man at Beaver Dam, Wis. Questioning brought out the fact that no payments of interest had been missed but that none of the principal had been paid on the mortgage. The mortgagor, however, showed receipts from the bank totaling full payment of the mortgage and that the final payment had been made in 1914. Other mortgages are showing up that were thought to have been settled years ago. It is also being found that the bank has been very lax in recording papers.
There have been misrepresentations in obtaining signatures to papers. The appraisers in one estate of which Mr. Sylvester was executor signed the appraisal blanks. They were asked to sign two papers. In looking up the estate it was found that the second paper was signed as bondsmen. The estate is ten years old and is still partially unsettled. The Stratton Estate left a fund, the income from which goes to the Methodist Church and to the cemetery for twenty years and then the principle was to go to the church. The fund has been there twenty-three years.
How mixed up papers will effect the payment on deposits cannot be determined. Papers of estates and other things that have been used as the bank’s assets, we understand, will be taken care of, and an equity established for them.
County Attorney Foley reports that no progress has been made in the search for

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E. L. Sylvester. A nephew of F. J. Nettekoven, who visited here last summer, wrote him that he had seen Mr. Sylvester at Middleton, Wis., but did not know at that time he was wanted. When questioned he was not positive that it was Mr. Sylvester. Active search has however ceased, but officers are watching for any clue that might lead to his trail.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sylvester drove to Rochester Sunday where they spent the day with their daughter, Miss Katherine.

March 27, 1925-
Dead Man had Ed. Sylvester Appearance
Belief of Preston Resident Causes Investigation at Lanesboro
Marks on body Show Great Difference From the Missing Banker
Report Now Current That Absconding Banker Had Considerable Money
The man killed near Lanesboro following the disappearance of E. L. Sylvester was not Mr. Sylvester according to J. A. Watcher, who with P. D. Sylvester viewed the body Sunday. A glance at the face Mr. Watcher said showed some resemblance but a closer look showed the man to be older and smaller. To be positive they checked over various markings. The teeth, hands and finger and the markings on the body showed a great difference from those of Mr. Sylvester.
No trace of Mr. Sylvester has been found. The search is confined to the activities of local officers and County Attorney Foley has advised that a reward should be offered. So far none has been raised.
Feeling of patrons of the Plainview State Bank is gradually turning against Mr. Sylvester. The long period over which defalcations and irregularities have extended is creating the feeling that it was al definitely planned out. There have been so many cases which involved the title of property that property owners are all a little on edge. The question of how much will be returned to the depositors is still causing worry. There are a great many cases where people of little means or earning capacity will be seriously effected if a good percentage is not paid.
It is now known that Mr. Sylvester had a good sum of money when he left here. $500 has been traced directly to him, he having received it only a few hours before he left. Many are of the opinion that finances are the least of his troubles.

March 28, 1925- Clipping
Arthur S. Kennedy, Plainview Banker is Arrested Today
Plainview, Minn. March 28 – Arthur S. Kennedy, assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank was arrested at noon today charged with grand larceny, according to county Attorney John R. Foley of Wabasha.
The warrant charged embezzlement of $650. Kennedy will be taken to Wabasha this afternoon and arraigned in justice court. The warrant was issued on information given by State Superintendent of Banks, A. J. Viegel of St. Paul.
Arthur S. Kennedy, assistant cashier and one of the stock holders of the closed Plainview State Bank, was arrested at noon today in Plainview on a warrant charging grand larceny, according to County Attorney John R. Foley of Wabasha County.
The warrant specifically charged embezzlement of $650.
The warrant on which Kennedy was arrested was the second to be issued in connection with the closing of the Plainview State Bank which shut its door March 4th.
E. L. Sylvester, president of the institution, left Plainview on the Saturday before the bank closed and has not been seen since. He is sought on a warrant charging him with embezzlement of approximately $700.
The embezzlements in the defunct institution, according to bank examiners will total at least $50,000 and possibly much more.
The arrest of Kennedy, according to J. A. Watcher, town marshal of Plainview, was not unexpected, and was delayed only pending the investigation into the affairs of the bank conducted by the examiners from the state department. Two examiners are still on the scene.

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E. L. Sylvester, the missing president, is the subject of a nation-wide search. Every clue which has been traced down to date has failed to reveal his whereabouts.

April 3, 1925- (from Winona Republican-Herald of March 28)
Bank Cashier is arrested in City Saturday
Warrant Issued for A. S. Kennedy on Information from Examiner
Charged with Larceny as Result of Irregularities Found
No New Clues Found in the Search for Sylvester, Missing President
Arthur S. Kennedy, assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, was placed under arrest this non charged with grand larceny, as a result of irregularities found there by state bank examiners, according to County Attorney John R. Foley, over long distance telephone from Plainview.
The warrant charging embezzlement of $650 was issued this morning by County Attorney Foley, upon information furnished by Superintendent of Banks, A. J. Veigel.
Kennedy will be taken to Wabasha this afternoon and arraigned on the charge in justice court there, according to Mr. Foley.
The arrest of Kennedy, following the irregularities at the institution discovered by bank examiners and the disappearance of Edwin L. Sylvester, for whom a warrant has already been issued, was no surprise to those close to the tangled affairs of the bank. It had been predicted for weeks by officials investigating the affair and county authorities.
The information resulting in the arrest was transmitted to the county attorney yesterday from St. Paul. This morning, armed with the warrant, they arrived at Plainview at 11 o’clock and Kennedy was immediately taken into custody.
This afternoon Deputy Sheriff John Jacobs and County Attorney Foley will return to Wabasha with the prisoner. He will be arraigned and bail will be furnished according to Mr. Foley.
(Kennedy pleaded not guilty and was released under bonds of $2,500)
Arthur S. Kennedy is one of the outstanding boosters for Plainview. During the ten years he has been connected with the Plainview State Bank, he has been one of the heaviest backers of all progressive movements inaugurated in that section. Perhaps his biggest achievement was the launching of the annual Wabasha county fair held at Plainview each fall and developing it into "the biggest little fair in Minnesota" as he termed it. Kennedy has been the secretary of the organization since it was established and has been credited with being the man who "put over" the fair.
A former secretary of the Plainview Commercial Club, he devoted a great deal of time to the developing of the truck farming industry around Plainview. He was a bog booster for the famous "Greenwood Prairie cabbage" and was instrumental in bringing a canning factory, a pickle station, and other markets for truck farming products to Plainview.
Kennedy is locally known as the outside man at Sylvester’s bank. He clerked at auctions held in that section and was in the foreground in all commercial enterprises.
He came to Plainview 10 years ago from Rochester. He is married and has three children.

April 10, 1925-
Bankrupt order Sought in Missing Banker Case
County Attorney J. R. Foley Moves in Matter of E. L. Sylvester
C. L. Mikkelson, Deputy Examiner, is Appointed Receiver
Steamship Records Show Absconding Banker has Not Left Country
County Attorney John R. Foley filed a petition in United States Court at Winona last Friday morning asking that E. L. Sylvester be declared involuntarily bankrupt. In this action Mr. Foley is acting for the state banking department. The petition cites six items as grounds for the action.
First – That on December 18, 1923, E. L. Sylvester gave a promissory note for

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$3,534.17 to Geo W. French of Carleton, Ore. which remains unpaid.
Second – That on December 26, 1924, he gave a promissory note for $500 to W. C. Allen that remains unpaid.
Third – That on June 1924 he gave Peter Fender of Little Valley a promissory note for $3,000 that remains unpaid.
Fourth – That on February 27, 1925 removed from the Plainview State Bank, $78.85 with the intention of hindering, delaying and defrauding his creditors.
Fifth – That on February 27, 1925 he withdrew $105.24 for paying taxes from the bank, on property that belonged to his wife, with the same intention.
Sixth – That he has disappeared and has made no effort to meet these obligations.
A hearing will not be arranged on the petition until a receiver was appointed. This appointment was rushed through and C. L. Mikkelson, deputy examiner in charge of the bank, was appointed by Judge Sanborn of the St. Paul U.S. court. Papers are being prepared at once for the bankruptcy suit and they will likely include more than the six items already mentioned as much of the paper in the bank is in Mr. Sylvester’s name and these proceedings will enable the banking department to establish the bank’s title.
In connection with the bank’s affairs, Mr. Mikkelson says that they are making good progress in tracing out accounts. There are however new things showing up nearly every day and he asks that people who have not presented their papers to do so at once. At present they are working on checking accounts and they ask that any who have pass books that have not been balanced since the closing to bring them in at once. The books will be balanced and returned with any canceled checks.
We have received a legal publication from the bank department which will be published next week and continues for the next three months. This notice gives the date and place for the presenting of claims against the bank.
In his search for E. L. Sylvester, County Attorney Foley has had a check made of all steamship records, and these records and those of passports issued show that Sylvester had not left the United States by the regular channels.

April 17, 1925-
Depositors to place Claims Against Bank
State Banking Department Issues Blank for That Purpose This Week
All Claims Must be Presented to Department of Banking at St. Paul
On all deposits Drawing Interest Claims Allowed Up to March 3
A notice for the presentation of claims against the Plainview State Bank is being published in the News this week by A. J. Veigel, superintendent of banks. The notice, which will continue to be published for the next three months, limits the time for the presentation of claims to August 4, 1925.
Blank forms on which claims are to be made are being mailed from the St. Paul office of the banking department to all patrons of the bank. The mailing started this week and if you have not received a blank you will likely in a few days. These blanks contain instructions for listing checking deposits, saving deposits, certificates of deposit and all other claims against the bank. While the blank is made out it will likely be well to take it to the bank to be checked by the examiners in charge to verify the amounts with the books of the bank. Having this verification it will then be necessary to have the blank signed by the notary public. All claims must be mailed or presented to the Department of Banking at St. Paul.
The examiners in charge of the bank with the claim blanks expect to verity amounts. They will however be glad to give any information or advice in properly making them out. Before these claims can be made it will be necessary that your passbook be balanced so if that has not been done since the closing of the bank it will be well to do so at once. On deposits drawing interest a claim may be presented for that interest up to March 3, the date of the closing of the bank.

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LEGAL NOTICES
Notices to creditors to make and file proof of claim.
WHEREAS, I, A. J. Veigel, Superintendent of Banks of the State of Minnesota, have taken possession of the property and business of the Plainview State Bank, Plainview Minnesota, and am liquidating its affairs pursuant to the laws of the State of Minnesota.
NOW THEREFORE, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That all persons who may have claims against said bank shall make legal proof thereof and file same with me at my office in the State Capitol at Saint Paul, Minnesota, on or prior to Monday, August 3rd, 1925, and I hereby direct that this notice be published for three successive months in the "Plainview News", a weekly newspaper published at Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota.
A. J. Veigel
Superintendent of Banks of the State of Minnesota

May 8, 1925- Mrs. E. W. Schwanbeck, Mrs. G. W. Sylvester, and Mrs. W. F. Woodcock are in Wabasha attending the 21st Annual Convention of the First District Women’s Club…
Edwin L. Sylvester Jr. came down from Minneapolis Saturday evening and spent Sunday with his mother.

May 15, 1925- Winona Republican Herald
Indictments Returned By Grand Jury at Wabasha
Cashier George F. Sylvester, Brother of Missing President, and Adolph Stoltz,
Assistant Cashier, Are Arrested After Grand Jury Investigating the Affairs of
Closed Plainview Bank Reports in Wabasha District Court
Are Released on Bail of $5,000
Wabasha, May 15 – George F. Sylvester, cashier, and Adolph Stoltz, assistant cashier of the Plainview State Bank of Plainview, were released on $5,000 bail here today following their arrest last evening at Plainview. Their arrest resulted from three indictments against each of them returned at 6 PM yesterday by the Wabasha county grand jury when it completed its work of investigating alleged irregularities in connection with the closing of the bank march 3, 1925.
Arthur S. Kennedy, the other assistant cashier of the closed institution, appeared before the court immediately after the grand jury report was received, and his bail was increased from $2,500 to $5,000 as a result of four indictments against him in the grand jury report. Arraignment of the three officers of the bank on the grand jury indictments will take place here Saturday noon.
Although no announcement was made of indictments against Edwin L. Sylvester, missing president of the bank who is now being hunted by Wabasha county authorities, it is believed that there were several against him in the secret indictments returned by the jury. Those, under the laws of Minnesota, cannot be made public until the defendants named in the indictments are under arrest.
The three officers of the bank indicted yesterday and Edwin L. Sylvester, the missing officer, were the sole owners of the closed institution’s $30,000 worth of capital stock.
Face Prison if Convicted.
Falsification of bank records and receiving of deposits with good reasons to believe the bank unsafe, are the charges in the three indictments against George Sylvester and Stoltz, while Kennedy is also charged with embezzlement in the matter of August Briese. Each indictment carries a charge that is a felony under the Minnesota laws which provide for a prison sentence.
The arrest of George Sylvester and Stoltz at 7 o’clock last evening by Deputy Sheriff John Jacobs at their homes in Plainview came as a complete surprise to the

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residents of Plainview. Heretofore they had been free from all charges in connection with the closing of the bank. Kennedy, the other officer indicted, had previously been arrested on the embezzlement charge as a result of a complaint issued by the banking department.
George Sylvester was found by the deputy sheriff at his home cutting the lawn, and was brought to Wabasha last evening dressed in working clothes. Stoltz was found eating supper with his family at home. He was taken in the same care with Sylvester to Wabasha.
The deputy sheriff, who was in Plainview on other matters when the grand jury returned in indictments, was notified by long distance telephone to make the arrest. This resulted in almost immediate execution of the wishes of the jury.
Dramatic Court Scene
Senator James A. Carley of Plainview appeared before the court and made arrangements for bonds for the two officers of the bank. Thomas McMeighen of St. Paul, appeared as Kennedy’s attorney. The reporting of the grand jury was one of the dramatic events in Wabasha court history. It had been rumored all day that the jury, which had spent three days investigating the tangled affairs of the closed bank, would report before the court adjourned for the day. At 5:30 PM Judge C. E. Callaghan dismissed the civil action being tried for the day, but remained on the bench and joined the small crowd in the court room watching the grand jury door. Just as the hands of the clock pointed to six the grand jury double doors opened and silently the jury marched out one by one up the alley to the judge’s bench and took their seats.
"Gentlemen, are you ready to report?" Judge Callaghan asked.
The foreman stood up and handed the judge a bundle of blue bound documents. The judge opened each one carefully and looked at the contents. There were ten documents. One by one he handed them down over the front of the bench to Clerk of Court Simon Drury, and the clerk entered them in the court records.
Kennedy Bail Raised
The Judge thanked the jury, and dismissed them. Kennedy, who had been one of the most interested onlookers during the day, and Attorney McMeighen marched up the alley to the judge’s bench.
A brief conversation between County Attorney John R. Foley and the St. Paul attorney followed. The judge’s attention was then called to Kennedy’s former bond of $2,500. The judge looked at Kennedy for a whole minute without saying a word. A pin could have been heard dropping in the court room.
"I don’t believe that is enough bail, under those charges," Judge Callaghan said slowly. "I place your bail at $5,000."
The attorney spoke up immediately and said they were prepared to furnish that amount.
An outline of the charges against the three defendants under arrest, announced last evening to newspapermen by John R. Foley shows the extensive investigation made by the grand jury.
Summary of Indictments
Following is a summary of the indictments:
First – All three officers of the bank are charged jointly with receiving deposits with good reasons to believe the bank unsafe.
Second – George Sylvester, with receiving deposits on March 3 with good reasons to believe the bank unsafe.
Third – Stoltz receiving deposits on March 3 with good reasons to believe the bank unsafe.
Fourth – Kennedy receiving deposits on March 3 with good reasons to believe the

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bank unsafe.
Fifth – Kennedy, embezzlement in the matter of August Briese.
Sixth – Kennedy making false entries on bank records.
Seventh – George Sylvester, making false entries on bank records.
Eighth – Stoltz, making false entries on bank records.
The other indictments returned by the jury were not made public.
Daughters are Students Here
Stoltz, according to information from Plainview today, has been a stockholder and officer of the Plainview State bank for the past eight years. He was assistant cashier. He is a married man with a wife and four children, two boys in Plainview and two girls who are students at Winona Teachers College.
George Sylvester was cashier of the bank and is a married man with a wife and three grown daughters, none of whom are at home.
Both officers of the bank who became involved yesterday in the Sylvester case as a result of the grand jury indictments have been active in business circles in Plainview and are widely known in Wabasha county.
The date of trial of the actions resulting from the grand jury indictments will be set Saturday when the three officers arrested are arraigned. The regular criminal calendar will come to trial May 25 at this term of court. The Sylvester cases, however, may not come before the court before the November term, it was rumored about the courtroom today.
Convention of Federation of Women at Wabasha. Mrs. W. F. Woodcock, B. E. Rohweder, C. D. Burchard attended with Mrs. E.W. Schwanbeck…
Indictments number 10 against trio – G. F. Sylvester and G. A. Stoltz placed under arrest at once.

May 22, 1925-
Bank Officials enter Plea of Not Guilty
Geo. F. Sylvester and G. A. Stoltz, officers of the Plainview Bank were arraigned in District court… on Monday Sylvester and Stoltz entered pleas of not guilty to the three charges against them…

June 5, 1925- Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Caldwell drove from St. Paul and spent the weekend with their mother, Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester.
Miss Marion Sylvester wishes to announce that she will take piano and voice pupils for a 6 weeks period term beginning July 1. Rates for term $12. 2 Lessons per week. Adv.

June 12, 1925- People State Bank Opens Doors
(Adv. from Marion Sylvester repeated.)

June 26, 1925- Miss Marion Sylvester who has been teaching at West Minister College Salt Lake City, Utah, returned home this week for the summer vacation.

July 24, 1925- Insurance business of Geo. F. Sylvester bought by People State Bank.

August 21, 1925-
Pioneer Banker of this City Dies Suddenly –
Geo. F. Sylvester, Indicted in Bank Case Here, Drops Dead
Prominent Resident Here Many Years – Funeral Held Wednesday
Geo. F. Sylvester, one of Plainview’s most prominent residents for nearly 30 years, dropped dead at his home Monday afternoon at 3:30 while writing at his typewriter. Just a few minutes before he had been about the house as usual and had been up town during the day. The cause of death was heart failure. For many years he has suffered with diabetes and since the closing of the Plainview State Bank, of which he was cashier, has failed rapidly but the finding of his lifeless body by his daughter, Miss Marion, was a great shock to the family and the community.
Mr. Sylvester was born on his father’s homestead in Plainview township July 20, 1862. Completing his education in the Plainview schools, he went to Madison Wisconsin where he learned telegraphy. From 1882 to 1886, he was employed as

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Telegraph operator at various places in the Great Northern Railroad. On June 6, 1886, he became station agent at Milaca and was thus employed until March 17, 1897. In that year he came to Plainview and became associated with his brother, E. L. Sylvester, in the Plainview Bank, becoming cashier. Only July 6, 1906, the bank was organized as the Plainview State Bank and he continued as cashier until it closed on March 4th of this year. He was one of the organizers of the Wabasha County Fair Association and has served as secretary of that association for 14 years and with his retirement became and honorary member. He was a member of the Methodist Church for many years and later became a member of the Congregational Church, acting on the boards and working diligently in the interest of the church. For 20 years he served as a member and secretary of the Board of Education. He was also clerk of the local Woodmen Lodge, Past Grand of the Odd Fellows Lodge, treasurer of the Eastern Star, a past member of the Masonic Lodge, and a member of the Scottish Rite Consistory at Winona and the Mystic Shrine at St. Paul. He has always been prominently associated with business, community and social enterprises of the city.
On January 1, 1886 Mr. Sylvester was united in marriage to Catherine M. Whilt. They have been the parents of five children: Leon C., who died while they were at Milaca, Anna S. who is Mrs. R. J. R. Baker of Port Byron, Ill, Beatrice, who was burned to death in the Iroquois Theatre fire in Chicago (NOTE: This is an error.), Katherine s. of Rochester, and Marion F. at home. The wife and three children survive.
Funeral services were held at the home Wednesday afternoon, conducted by C. F. Martin, pastor of the Church of Christ. Interment was made in the Woodland Cemetery. The Odd Fellows Lodge gave the burial service at the grave.
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. R. Baker arrived Monday evening from Port Byron, Ill. being called here by the death of her father, G. F. Sylvester.

September 4, 1925- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester and daughter, Miss Marion, returned home Saturday from Port Byron, Ill. where they have been spending a few days at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. J. Baker.

October 2, 1925- Mrs. G. F. Sylvester left Monday for Lincoln, Nebraska and will make her home with her daughter who is teaching there.

October 16, 1925- Clipping
Plainview Folk Act to Capture Missing Banker
Citizens Organize to Halt Removal of Sylvester Property
Say "things are going too easily"
Indignation Aroused Over Failure of Action in Case
To prevent alleged removal of property of E. L. Sylvester bankrupt, to provide for offering a reward for the capture of the missing Plainview banker, and to delve deeply into the affairs of the defunct Plainview State Bank of Plainview, a citizens’ organization has been perfected in the village with the avowed intention of assisting the public officials and the banking department and depositors, in salvaging al that is possible and in bringing the guilty to justice.
Officers have been elected as follows, it was announced late yesterday: Chairman – Judson Wentworth, Secretary – Lawrence C. Ryan, Working Committee – Judson Wentworth, George F. Duerre and Charles E. Richmond.
The citizen’s organization has been under consideration for weeks past due, it was stated, to the fact that a good deal of the property of E. L. Sylvester was being carried away and that the remainder was about to be removed.
County Attorney Acts
This condition of affairs was called to the attention of the County Attorney John R. Foley of Wabasha county and he immediately took steps to prevent further disposition of the property in this manner, it was stated.
His action was for the purpose of making it possible to bring the property into

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court so that ownership may be established. This action was possible because of the fact that Mr. Sylvester has been judged as bankrupt.
It was the sense of the citizens organization at a recent meeting that "things have been sliding along too easily" and members of the organization are said to be determined that public sentiment should be aroused and efforts made to conserve in every way the property which is believed to belong to depositors of the bank.
It was decided to petition the board of county commissioners of Wabasha county to offer a suitable reward for the apprehension of one, E. L. Sylvester.
Demand Fair Deal
Announcement was made to the public as follows: "It is the desire of the citizens’ committee to assist the public in getting a fair deal as far as possible. The committee will be glad to have the support of the people of Plainview and vicinity in their work and any information which will be of value, will be gratefully received."
The latest sensational development in the affairs of the Plainview bank comes as a climax of a series of incidents which started February 28 when Edwin Sylvester, head of the institution, bade his family goodbye and disappeared.
Events in Bank Case

March 4 – Plainview State Bank voluntarily closed its doors. State examiners began work.
March 5 – Authorities asked to search for Sylvester.
March 7 – Sylvester traced to Chicago.
March 9 – Warrant issued for Sylvester charging embezzlement. Shortage placed at $45,000.
March 10 – Wabasha county authorities launched nationwide search for Sylvester.
March 13 – Examiners announced that irregularities had extended for a period of 18 years.
March 19 – Double of Sylvester found near Madison, Wisconsin.
March 27 – Arthur S. Kennedy assistant cashier arrested on charges of embezzlement.
May 9 – First hearing of creditors in involuntary bankruptcy case of Edwin L. Sylvester, held at Winona. Bank shortage officially placed at $97,000.
May 12 – Wabasha county grand jury started investigation of alleged irregularities in connection with closing of the bank.
May 14 – Further indictments returned.
George Sylvester, a brother of the president of the bank, was among those indicted. He recently died of heart trouble.

October 30, 1925-
Date Named for Sylvester Bankrupt Case

November 7th Set By Winona Officials For Hearing
Application of Banker’s Wife to Set Aside Personal Property
Warm Legal Battle Expected in Federal Court Next Week
Winona will be the scene of the next act in the Sylvester case, when an application of Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester to set aside the homestead and personal property will be heard. H. M. Bierce, referee in the bankruptcy, has set the hearing for 1:30 PM on Saturday, Nov. 7.
The application asks that in the absence of the involuntary bankrupt, that the personal property and homestead, which are exempt from the assets of the bankrupt man under the bankruptcy laws, be turned over to his wife.
The application will be poised by the receiver, C. L. Mikkelson, supported by Plainview citizens, on the theory that money wrongfully taken from the closed Plainview State Bank by E. L. Sylvester, who is now a fugitive from justice, was used in the purchase and improvement of the exempt personal property and for that reason it should be included in the assets. Some action along the same line is expected in regard

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to insurance policies.
Mr. Mikkelson prepared his answer to the application Thursday and informs us that the hearing will take the form of a regular trial. He also said that information known only to the members of the closed bank and the state banking department, will likely come out at this hearing which will show the manner of handling deposits in the bank. A warm legal battle is expected in the federal court.
In case the application is not allowed by the federal court, the case is expected to be continued in district court as a civil case.
The Wabasha County Commissioners at a special meeting Tuesday duplicated the $500 reward offered last week by Governor Christianson for the arrest of E. L. Sylvester. The depositors committee appeared before them, presenting their petition, which was granted without hesitation. This makes the reward for the capture of the missing banker $1,000. These rewards have revived the speculation as to Mr. Sylvester’s whereabouts and many rumors are passing around, among them a statement supposed to be made with authority, that he would be taken within a week.
The depositor’s organization has, for the past week or more, been circulating a paper asking for subscripters to a fund for providing funds to carry on their work. Their main expense will be that of attorney’s fees, but the committee will need some money to carry on their work.
The Wabasha county authorities have been constantly working toward the capture of Sylvester ever since he boarded the train for Chicago. They have found some information but while none of it has led them any nearer, apparently, to his arrest, it has proven to them that he is still alive.

November 13, 1925-
Sylvester Case Hearing Saturday Discloses Startling Facts
Finances of Missing Banker’s Family Are Barred at Winona
Senator Carley Makes Public Information Concerning Expenditures
Bank Records show Mrs. Sylvester Drew Checks for $55,000
Young Son of Family Drew on Father for $11,000 in 4 years
Fifty-five thousand dollars, it is alleged, was drawn from the Plainview State Bank by Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, wife of the missing president of that institution, during the eleven years ending Dec. 31, 1924 and Edwin L. Sylvester Jr., "baby" of the Sylvester family, spent $11,000 attending the University of Minnesota in four years.
That is where some of the money went which Edwin L. Sylvester, now a fugitive from justice with a reward of $1,000 offered for his capture, is alleged to have taken from the bank according to a statement issued to the press by Senator James A. Carley, attorney for the closed bank, and for the trustees in the involuntary bankruptcy case of the vanished Plainview banker.
Figures Taken From Bank Statements
Senator James A. Carley’s sensational disclosures given as reasons for the bank’s failure, were taken from data furnished by the Minnesota banking department, and the detailed table of checks drawn on the bank, that will later be introduced as evidence in the trustee fight to save for the bank depositors the money that can be realized from the Sylvester homestead, and other personal property of the bankrupt normally exempt as assets under the federal bankruptcy law.
The information would have been released through direct testimony of banking experts Saturday if the hearing here had not abruptly ended after a clash over legal questions with a continuation to Dec. 12 without the trustee witness testifying.
The vast volume of data representing months of work by the employees of the banking department was thrown open to the press at the close of the hearing so that the people of Plainview and the depositors of the closed bank might learn for the first time

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some of the facts back of the failure of the institution, according to Senator Carley.
Time to Let People Know
"We have sat still for almost eight months without making a move," the lawyer declared, "and during that time have had criticism after criticism heaped upon our heads up there, but I feel that it is now time to let the people know some of the facts and a little about the tremendous expenses of Mrs. Sylvester and her children."
The testimony on the witness stand at Winona Saturday of Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester, who was the first member of the banker’s family to talk at a public hearing since the crash came at Plainview last March, and who for the first time disclosed to the public in direct testimony the financial methods used within the Sylvester family, together with the inside bank information made public by Senator Carley, gives a complete insight into the wrecking of the bank.
A detailed table showing month by month amounts drawn on the bank by Mrs. E. L. Sylvester covering the period from Dec. 31, 1913 to Dec. 31, 1924, was one of the big features of Senator Carley’s disclosure.
The total for each year follows:
1914 – $3,091.21
1915 – $3,818.09
1916 – $4,682.89
1917 – $4,233.33
1918 – $5,011.83
1919 – $5,224.35
1920 – $6,764.81
1921 – $5,283.70
1922 – $5,578.93
1923 – $4,958.09
1924 – $4,573.73
Total – $53,220.95
Other Checks Not Included
A note at the bottom of the detailed table lists checks amounting to $1,781.42 drawn by Mrs. Sylvester on the bank during the above period and not included in the total. These checks were drawn against the building fund, one of the features of the attempt to show that money wrongfully taken from the bank was used to improve and purchase the property normally exempted from bankrupt assets. This additional sum according to Senator Carley, makes the grand total of money drawn out of the Plainview State Bank by Mrs. Sylvester during this eleven year period $55,002.37.
"This vas sum of money," Senator Carley said, "does not include checks given by E. L. Sylvester for household expenses, electric lights, telephone bills, fuel, auto expenses or for taxes upon the property for either E. L. Sylvester or Mrs. E. L. Sylvester. It is only money drawn through checks by Mrs. Sylvester for her own personal use."
"During the period covered by this table," the Wabasha county attorney continued, "Sylvester’s salary for the last few years of that period was only $200.00 per month and for the first few years only $150.00 per month, according to his own bank records. His other bank income consisted of dividends of the bank stock which did not exceed $1,500 a year and there were no dividends paid since 1920."
"In addition to Mrs. Sylvester’s checks," Senator Carley added, "the other five members of the Sylvester family drew large sums of money each year from the bank on their personal checks and through notes. The records of the bank disclose that Edwin L. Sylvester Jr., son of the head of the family, spent $11,000 during the four years he attended the University of Minnesota."
"It must also be remembered that during the same period," Senator Carley said, "that Sylvester paid out $12,500 in insurance premiums on the $26,000 worth of


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insurance which was introduced at today’s hearing and asked by Mrs. Sylvester’s attorneys to be exempt from the assets of the estate."
At the Saturday hearing Mrs. Sylvester on the witness stand described the financial methods used in the Sylvester family as that of simply drawing checks upon the Plainview State Bank whenever funds were required. She stated definitely on the stand that she knew nothing about the bank and was never behind the counter of the institution.
No Knowledge of Source
During the cross examination by Senator Carley, Mrs. Sylvester stated that she had no knowledge of the source of the money she was spending. The checks she wrote, she declared were always good and were taken care of at the bank.
"Mrs. Sylvester," Senator Carley continued, "today on the witness stand stated that the money to rebuild or remodel the Sylvester home, which according to the appraisers, appointed by the court, is worth $10,000, came from her dead soldier son’s insurance, but the bank records show this money to a large extent was used to meet notes of the family."
The following statements give the disposition of this insurance money as Sylvester bank records have it, according to copies of bank examiner’s reports submitted by Senator Carley:
Life Insurance Reports
Report of Life Insurance policies of Byrl Sylvester, payable to his mother, Hettie D. Sylvester.
Banker’s Life Insurance policy check dated July 28, 1918 – $5,000.
This check was issued as follows: Note of B. E. Sylvester dated May 14, 1917, Paid July 2, 1918 – $5,000.
Interest on above note – $30.00.
Note of Hettie D. Sylvester Dated May 9, 1917 – $2,000.
Proceeds of note deposited to R. Chapman estate paid July 2, 1918 – Interest on above note – $120. Certificate of deposit $2,350.
The certificate of deposit of $2,350 noted above was cashed on July 11, and $350 credited to the account of E. L. Sylvester and the remaining $2,000 placed in another certificate of deposit.
The new certificate was cashed on July 19, 1918 and $1,000 was placed in the Building account of Hettie D. Sylvester.
On the other policy check dated July 3, $5,020.55 was received.
This amount was placed on deposit July 6. It was used as follows:
Meta Holmes (a daughter) note - $1,700.
Interest on note - $91.57
Meta Holmes Note - $2,000.
Interest on Note - $107.72
Certificate of Deposit - $1,311.95
Balance made up by check of E. L. Sylvester - $190.69.
This last certificate of deposit was cashed and the fund used to increase the surplus of the bank from$20,000 to$30,000 September 23, 1920.
The Building Fund, around which the hearing in federal court at Winona Saturday revolved, consisted of $1,850 that can be traced to Mrs. Sylvester’s deposits, according to Senator Carley, and the remainder of the $6,500 in the fund comes direct from the missing president’s account.
"We have checks and receipts to show," Carley added, "that E. L. Sylvester himself paid the greater part of this remodeling or rebuilding expense."
Kept Accurate Records

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"One of the features of the entire Plainview State Bank affair," Senator Carley added, "was the remarkable records left by the missing president. Every transaction made was shown on the records and the work of untangling it has been made much easier on this account."
"His wrong doings," Carley continued, "were all along one line. Mortgages was his field and he kept strictly to his field. His whole misappropriation consisted of selling mortgages that were already paid to some investor which he knew and used this money for his own purposes and to meet other mortgage payments that he had previously sold. Some of those already paid mortgages he used as live assets in the bank." A certain percentage of the funds was taken from "Peter to pay Paul."
Many examples of the methods employed by Sylvester in his handling of the mortgages were related by Senator Carley.
Saw That Interest Was Paid
"He always saw that the interest was paid to the investor on his purchased mortgages, and make it clear to him that for the best interest of the bank," Carley narrated, "that the mortgagee should not know that the bank had resold his paper."
"There is one man, a former resident of Plainview, who had $41,000 worth of these mortgages," Carley added. "He used to come to Plainview each year and spent two weeks with Sylvester. They were great fishing pals. Before this man would return home, some night in the bank, Sylvester would show him a neatly typewritten sheet stating ‘here are your mortgages.’ Each item was carefully listed. The man took Sylvester’s word and after the closing of the bank his safety deposit box, which was supposed to contain these securities was opened. It contained only notations of the transactions. Not a mortgage was there. He had only a typewritten list of mortgages that had long ago been paid by the mortgagees. (NOTE: This may have been Pete Wood.)
Other examples Cited
Data backing each of these examples was produced from the voluminous records of the bank, which were brought to Winona, and from which then banking experts were to testify at the hearing.
The remarkable confidence that the people of Plainview and the surrounding territory had in Sylvester made this possible, according to Carley. It was a plain case, as Mrs. Sylvester stated on the witness stand at the Saturday hearing of "Confidence breeds carelessness."
Bank Situation Brighter
What percentage of recovery the depositors of the bank will receive cannot yet be determined, according to Senator Carley. The exact amount of the shortage is not yet even known, he revealed. This is due to many entangled mortgages the bank held or was handling. Sylvester’s plan of taking funds from "Peter to pay Paul," and visa-versa has left a cross-word puzzle that is going to take plenty of time to clear up.
"But I will say," Carley added, "that the whole situation today is much brighter than it was three months ago. Mr. Mikkelson, the receiver of the bank, has done some remarkable work during the past three months in collecting notes and straightening out mortgages and the depositors today stand in a much more favorable position than they have at any time since the doors of the bank closed. There are cases coming in court, the outcome of which will materially affect the bank, and many other tangled legal and banking affairs must be settled before anyone is in a position to state what percentage of recovery the depositors will received.
Raps Bankers Association
"Another remarkable thing about the Sylvester case," Senator Carley added, "and I believe it’s true of many others, is that the American Bankers Association and the Minnesota Bankers Association has done nothing to capture this fugitive, who worked from behind the counter of the bank robbing the people, but these same organizations

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form rangers, offering big rewards and hire many detectives to hunt and fight robbers who work from the outside. I believe it’s about time something was done by the bankers of this land to get the robbers who work from within the bank. Just think, eight months elapsed before a reward was offered for the capture of Sylvester and then the reward was advanced by the state of Minnesota and the county of Wabasha."
"Just think" the attorney said, "what a man could do to change his appearance in a period of eight months. Why, he has had sufficient time to change his every means of identification and who knows if he’ll ever be found. But at least we have brought a few facts to light to show who unquestionably was partly to blame for Sylvester’s wrong doings."

November 20, 1925-
Plainview Bank Officials Enter Not Guilty Pleas
Two of Four Indicted Men Were Assistant Cashiers of Institution
A. S. Kennedy and G. A. Stoltz Plead Not Guilty in Wabasha Court
Bank Actions on Criminal Calendar to Have Statewide Interest
At the beginning of the District Court session at Wabasha on Monday, with Judge Carl Finkelnburg of Winona, presiding, the civil calendar of twenty-seven cases was placed before the criminal calendar. It was expected that the civil calendar would take about ten days. The criminal cases would be called some time next week. In the criminal cases the charges against the officers of the Plainview State Bank will have statewide interest.
G. A. Stoltz and A. S. Kennedy, assistant cashiers of the bank, appeared before the court Monday to enter their pleas. Stoltz pleaded not guilty to the three indictments against him and asked the court to appoint an attorney to represent him stating that he had no money to hire a legal representative. A rumor had reached the court that Stoltz had inherited several thousand dollars and said they would investigate his case before taking action.
Kennedy’s attorney was not present and his plea was made at the session Wednesday. His plea was not guilty to the four charges against him much to the surprise of the few who are familiar with the evidence, much of which is substantiated by his own handwriting.

November 25, 1925- clipping – Rochester Daily Bulletin.
"Get Sylvester" Foley’s motive for Man Hunt
Plainview Bank Cashier Fails to Take Stand
Thrilling Session of Court Moves to Speedy Climax as Defense Rests
Former Local Man on Trial for Fraud
Oratory Sweeps the Court Room as Counsels Plead Conviction, Freedom
Wabasha, Minn., Nov. 25 – The fate of Arthur Kennedy, former Rochester man, and assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, is in the hands of a Wabasha county jury.
In a thrilling session of district court here this morning, the case moved to a speedy climax when the state rested at 9:30 and the defense presented its case without putting Kennedy on the stand.
The decision of the defense to keep Kennedy off the stand and present its evidence solely through character witnesses was the principal surprise of the concluding session. It had been freely predicted that Kennedy would testify in his own behalf, and when the defense rested after half a dozen residents of Plainview and Wabasha county had testified as to his character, the surprise was general.
Completes Charge
It was exactly 12 o’clock when Judge Carl Finkelnberg completed his charge to the jury and ordered the 12 men to be sworn. The jury went out to dinner and then began its closed session.

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Oratory swept over the crowded court room in waves as County Attorney John R. Foley and Thomas McMeekin, prosecutor and defense attorneys, exhorted the jury to deal fairly.
County Attorney Foley began his oration with a resume of the facts in the case and the evidence presented by the bank examiners.
Then he plunged into a scathing denunciation of men in public places – of men in whom rests public trust and who violate that trust.
"There are Judases in our midst!" he shouted, waving his arms at the jury.
"There are men sitting behind cages of our banks, taking our money and our wives’ and children’s money. Kennedy here, had a good reputation in this community. Of course, he did. So did Sylvester. But the bank is closed. THE BANK IS CLOSED! We are not charging Kennedy with stealing. We are charging him with falsifying the records of the bank."
A Friend of Kennedy’s
"I care not who Kennedy is. I care not for his religion or his nationality. Religion, nationality and politics have nothing to do with the case. Nor did I care what he was before the bank was closed. I was a good friend of Kennedy and we did many things together. But that has nothing to do with this case. We are here to decide his guilt or innocence and with the facts you have been given, I trust you will bring in a fair and just verdict."
Throughout the bitter harangue, Kennedy sat with his head in his hands, moving not a muscle.
Then Tom McKeekin, Mr. Kennedy’s lawyer arose.
"Counsel has suggested," he began in a low, quiet voice, "that someone has lost his money through the perfidy and criminality of Arthur Kennedy. Gentlemen," and his vice rang through the court room with these words: "Can you find anybody in this county who will come in and say, ‘you stole my money?’ If you can find someone to come in and say that Kennedy stole his money, then Mr. Kennedy should be found guilty and you should put him away."
Are Trying Kennedy
"But we are not trying the failure of the Plainview bank in this case. We are trying Mr. Kennedy. And gentlemen, you have heard that Mr. Kennedy, after the bank closed, worked hand in hand with the bank examiners. We are trying here a man who did not run away – who went to the bank day in and day out, helping to explain the records and clear up the facts. Does that show his guilt? Ask yourselves, gentlemen, would I trust this man with my confidence…" (NOTE: End of clipping.)

November 26, 1925- Winona Republican Herald.
A. S. Kennedy, Plainview Banker, Found Guilty
Crime Carries Penalty of One to Ten Years
Eloquent Closing Pleas Made by Foley and McMeekin – Kennedy Not Called
to Stand – Cries during Plea of Counsel
Widows, Orphans Robbed – Foley
The case of Adolph Stoltz, former assistant
cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, will
come to trial Monday at 9 o’clock, it was
announced by County Attorney John R. Foley at
the closing of the Kennedy case at noon today.
Wabasha, Minn., Nov. 25 – Arthur S. Kennedy, former assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, was found guilty by a jury in district court here today of a charge of making false entry on the books of the corporation.
The jury got the case at noon, and after dinner began deliberation, bringing in the verdict at 2:15 PM. They pondered over the decision about half an hour, only two

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ballots being taken. The first was 11 to 1 for conviction.
The crime carries with it commitment of from one to 10 years in the state penitentiary at Stillwater. Sentence was expected to be imposed this afternoon.
Wabasha, Minn. Nov. 25 – The case of Arthur S. Kennedy, assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, and defendant in a criminal action resulting from irregularities in the affairs of that institution, being tried in district court here, was given to the jury at 12 o’clock this noon.
The morning session was occupied with the pleas of County Attorney John R. Foley, who is representing the state, and Thomas W. McMeekin, counsel for Kennedy, after which Judge Karl Finkelnburg gave his instructions to the jury.
Much to the surprise of the court attaches and spectators who again filled the court room today, the defendant Kennedy was not called to the witness stand in his own defense.
With the verdict of the jury, court is expected to be adjourned over the Thanksgiving holiday.
Branding Kennedy as a Judas, betrayer of God, and Benedict Arnold, traitor to his country, County Attorney Foley, make a fiery appeal in presenting the state’s arguments to the jury.
Had Always Been Friends
In opening he stated that Kennedy had always been a warm personal friend of his, and recalled the pleasant instances of the acquaintance. "It requires an immense amount of courage," he said "to come out and prosecute a friend, and before this came up I would have testified to the excellency of his character. It is one thing to think of a friend as a friend, and another to think of him as a law violator. A banker is a man outstanding in his community, a leader, a man in which you can place unlimited trust."
Mr. Foley then told of the shock which Plainview felt at the bank’s failure, and of the effect on the community after the closing of the institution.
"They have been stealing from widows, orphans, and old gray men, people who had sacrificed their whole life savings when the bank went down, stealing from their very own friends."
Claim Records Falsified
"This has been going on over a long period of time, and was made possible by the falsifying of records. Bank laws have been made for the protection of depositors so that the community might with safety take confidence in the bank and the people who represent it."
He then referred to the particular… (NOTE: End of clipping.)

November 27, 1925-
A. S. Kennedy Loses Fight in Bank Case
Former Cashier of Closed Institution Convicted on Wednesday
Jury Makes Decision in Record Time at Wabasha
Arthur S. Kennedy is guilty of the falsification of bank records was the verdict of the jury, returned in less than two hours after receiving instructions. At the conclusion of the pleas the jury was given the charge at just 12 o’clock noon Wednesday. Fifteen minutes later they went to dinner and returning, presented their verdict after a twenty minute session.
The pronouncement of the sentence was postponed by the court until next Monday morning. The penalty in this case is not less than one year and not more than ten. No statement has been made by the prosecution as to what would be done with the other three indictments as to whether they would be pushed or not. In case of an appeal by the defendant the other cases will of course be taken up. The court has called G. A. Stoltz to appear for trial on Monday and he will be tried on the indictment of taking money when he knew or believed the bank was insolvent. As yet no further action has

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been taken in regard to Stoltz’ attorney, application for which he made to the court when he entered his plea of not guilty.
The case is the first of the criminal actions to be tried in connection with the closing of the Plainview State Bank on March 4. With four indictments against him, Kennedy was called for trial at 1:30 PM Monday of this week. At that time the selection of the jury began, two Plainview men being chosen. The jury was completed just before six o’clock as follows: Jess Herron – garage man, Plainview, Ernest Tesmer – farmer, West Albany, John Berktold – farmer, Mt. Pleasant, Henry R. Gray – business man, Plainview, Henry Eversman – farmer, Kellogg, Bert Hoskins – garage man, Zumbro Falls, John Muldon – farmer, Gilford, Chas. Giesler – farmer, Lake City, Lawrence Holden – grocer, Lake City, Charles Cleveland – farmer, Glasgow, Tony Beck – hardware man, Lake City, John Sexton – farmer, Oakwood.
The actual trial began Tuesday morning with County Attorney John R. Foley prosecuting the case unassisted. Following a brief history and explanation of the bank affairs, Foley began the presentation of evidence by calling John G. Schultz, bank examiner to the stand. Schultz identified the books presented by the state as those of the Plainview State Bank and testified that he had visited the bank officially as examiner last fall and twice later on business of the banking department on the complaint of one of the bank’s depositors. In the cross examination McMeekin fixed the fact that the bank had closed voluntarily and that the examiner had made visits to the bank in the few months preceding its closing.
Foley then called C. L. Mikkelson, deputy bank examiner in charge of the bank affairs, to the stand. He further identified the books and papers and the handwriting of officers of the bank, particularly that of Kennedy in the transaction which was to be taken up. The transaction on which the case centered covered the payment of interest and the sale of notes. The sum of $280 was paid to John Joachim last December on recommendation of the bank when he had wished to draw $4,000 from the bank for which he had a certificate of deposits and which he had intended to deposit elsewhere. The notes he purchased bore eight per cent interest of which the bank was to receive one per cent as commission. The interest was paid when due to Mr. Joachim from the cash account of the bank and a slip was placed in the cash drawer to show the disposition of that amount. Later on January 12 following John A. Appel paid interest of over $400 to the bank on notes totaling over $5,000 on four notes fro money which he had borrowed from the bank. He also paid some on the principal of the notes and in the transaction cancelled the old notes and made two new ones totaling $2,500. The falsification of the records occurred in the entry of the interest paid by Appel. The entries in the ledgers of the bank showed that Appel had paid $280 less than was due and was actually paid. The listing of the interest in this manner cancelled the shortage in the cash account for the money paid Joachim and left a perfect balance in the bank books. Objections sustained by the judge prevented the prosecution from bringing out further facts in regard to the $4,000 note transaction with Joachim.
In cross examination McMeekin brought out the fact that Kennedy worked with the officers in the state banking department in every way possible to assist them in straightening out the tangled records. That he had rescued information only once and that was on this $280 transaction. He also endeavored to show that no money was gained by the bank or any one in this case.
Mikkelson continued on the stand in the afternoon and John Joachim was also called. John Appel was in the hospital at Wabasha and his testimony was taken in the evening and read to the court the next morning. Several Plainview men were called to the stand as character witnesses for Kennedy and the testimony was finished.
Foley opened his plea to the jury summing up the evidence and bringing out

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pointedly the facts that proved Kennedy guilty. He stated that the defendant had always been a warm personal friend of his and recalled the pleasant instances of the acquaintance, "it requires an immense amount of courage," he said, "to come out and prosecute a friend and before this came up I would have testified to the excelllency of his character. It is one thing to think of a friend as a friend and another to think of him as a law violator. A banker is a man outstanding in his community, a leader, a man in which you can place unlimited trust."
Foley then told of the shock to Plainview at the bank’s failure and of the effect on the community following the closing of the institution.
"They have been stealing from widows, orphans and gray men, people who sacrificed their whole life savings when the bank went down, stealing from their very own friends.
This has been going on over a long period of time and was made possible by the falsifying of the records. Bank laws had been made for the protection of depositors so that the community might with safety take confidence in the bank and the people who represent it."
He then referred to the particular charge against Kennedy and rehearsed the records in the case. He told how Appel, had he not been paid by check, would have been out the $280. Branding Kennedy as a Judas, betrayer of God, and Benedict Arnold traitor to his country, Foley made a fiery appeal in presenting the state’s arguments. That he won his case in his plea is the opinion of many who followed the trial. The plea was far stronger than that of the defense attorney.
The plea of McMeekin was based on the testimony that there was no money loss sustained by the transaction. "Can you find a man in Wabasha county," he said, "who will come into court and say that there was a loss in this transaction? Kennedy worked hard, day after day, helping to straighten up the affairs of the bank. He did this voluntarily, he did not run away, he stayed on the job. Men from all over the county came today and testified that Kennedy’s reputation is as good today as it was when the bank closed.
"We did not put Kennedy on the…" (NOTE: End of Clipping.)

December 4, 1925-
Indeterminate sentence to Bank Cashier – A. S. Kennedy gets
from 1-10 years at Stillwater
Trial of G. A. Stoltz Opens At Court House in Wabasha Thursday
Bank’s Method of Doing Business To Be Aired in Court
An indeterminate sentence of from one to ten years was given to Arthur S. Kennedy by Judge Carl Finkelnburg in district court at Wabasha last Wednesday afternoon when the jury found him guilty of falsifying the records of the Plainview State Bank. He was given a stay of sentence until Monday noon and placed under $10,000 bond.
G. A. Stoltz, whose case was to be tried on Monday appeared in court represented by Murdoch & Lothrop. On Stoltz’s plea of lack of money the court had appointed Phillips & Lindemier of Lake City to defend him but friends had secured the Wabasha firm. The attorneys were granted time to prepare their case and trial was set for Thursday morning. The charge on which Stoltz is being tried is receiving money on deposit when he knew or believed the bank to be insolvent. The particular case in the indictment is receiving money from John Boehlke the day before the bank closed. The case is expected to bring out more completely the bank’s method of doing business than in the previous Kennedy case. Thirty more jury men were subpoenaed for service as the original panel was not sufficient for a selection.

December 4, 1925- clipping
New Evidence in Plainview Bank Case Introduced
Attempt to Prove Shortage Occurred Due to Bank Officials

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Offer Sylvester Notes to Court
Mikkelson Declares List of Exchange Money Boosted by the Bank
Wabasha, Minn. Dec. 4 (AP) – An attempt to prove that a loss of $108,498.38 was incurred by depositors of the defunct Plainview State Bank through the action of its officers in carrying paid up notes on the books as live assets was started in the district court here today in the trial of Adolph Stoltz, assistant cashier of the closed institution.
Stoltz, whose trial follows that of Arthur S. Kennedy, also an assistant cashier at the bank, who was given an indeterminate sentence of from one to ten years at Stillwater is charged with accepting depositors at a time when he knew the bank to be insolvent.
Occupies Stand
C. L. Mikkelson, receiver of the closed institution and star witness for the state, occupied the stand during the entire morning session, pouring into the court records scores of examples of alleged irregularities, facts which have never before been made in public.
Among other things he said that the two Sylvesters, Kennedy and Stoltz had notes in the bank totaling $18,000 which the bank carries as assets; that these four men owned all the stock which totaled $300,000; and that the listed assets at the time the bank closed were $698,481.
Upon cross examination Mikkelson was asked whether or not he could read the notes of the owner’s valuables and he replied that he could read them absolutely valueless.
Exhibits were also introduced which showed a considerable variance in the actual condition of the bank and its condition as reported by the officers.
Introduced Testimony
The minutes of the meeting of the board of directors at the time of the election of Stoltz as assistant cashier, were introduced in evidence.
Under direct examination Mikkelson declared at the time of the closing of the bank, the actual amount due from the Merchants Bank of Winona was $2,169.65, whereas the books of the Plainview institution showed that the amount ostensibly due on exchange from the Winona bank was $4,179.41.
The jury selected to try the case is composed almost entirely of farmers. One retired merchant, Jerry Keeman of Kellogg, is on the case. The other jurors are Walter Carsten, Oakwood; F. A. Wassman, Lake City; Frank Carrels, Wabasha; H. J. McDowell, Lake City; James Tittrington, Elgin; Clem Kreye, Hammond; Frank Ryan, Mount Pleasant; Wm. Howatt, Kellogg; Ralph Richardson, Elgin; J. A. Lamey, Kellog.
Resume Testimony
As evidence for the state was resumed this afternoon intended to show that the bank carried $108,489.38 in worthless paper of which but $25,000 was introduced before the noon recess, it became evident that the state would take up a large part of the Saturday session and it is likely that the defense will not take up the case until Monday before the noon recess, it became evident.
December 4, 1925-
Bank Loses Note Case on Tuesday
Jury Returns Verdict in Favor of H. G. Austin in Session
The case of the Plainview State Bank vs. H. G. Austin went to the jury Tuesday afternoon and was decided in favor of Mr. Austin. The bank was suing to collect on $5,700 in notes made out by Mr. Austin. The bank based its suit on the notes which they claimed were renewals of the old notes as evidence of the indebtedness and that there were no records or checks to show a payment of anything but interest.
In his defense, Mr. Austin stated that on January 5, he had gone to the bank and paid the interest on the notes by check and had made a settlement with E. L. Sylvester for the full value of the notes by paying him $3,500 in cash. G. A. Stoltz testified that Mr.

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Austin had come into the bank on that day to transact business connected with his notes and that he and Sylvester had gone to one of the office rooms at the back of the bank. When questioned regarding the carrying of that amount of money in cash Mr. Austin said that it consisted of three $1,000 bills and one $500 bill. The money, he said, was sporting money used in betting and that for years he had carried such sums. The records of the bank had already been proven unreliable in the Kennedy case. The question of the signature of the notes was not stressed. Senator James A. Carley represented the State Bank and Paul Strickland of Minneapolis, the defendant.

December 11, 1925-
Stoltz’ diary Reveals Much in Evidence
Trial of Assistant Cashier of Plainview Bank on at Wabasha
Large Expenditures of Sylvester Family Arouses Suspicion
Introduces Notes in Evidence – Examiner Fails to State Loss
With the state resting its case against G. A. Stoltz at 10:15 Thursday, defense attorney J. W. Murdoch made his statement of the case and called Stoltz to the stand for testimony. Murdoch pictured Sylvester as a dominating power in his community, trusted by everyone as a man who could do no wrong in taking up the task of proving to the jury that Stoltz was an innocent victim, that the insolvency of the bank was due to the same trust in Sylvester that was held by the community.
Stoltz had kept the list of transactions, known as the Sylvester IOU, through fear of his own safety. On various occasions he has signed bonds for Sylvester until at present he is liable to the extent of $23,000. When the spending of unusually large sums by the Sylvester family came to his notice he made this list as a means of checking up his own situation. Murdoch characterized Sylvester as the financial power of the community, the executor, the guardian and trustee of the entire countryside. "That is what he looked like to the people of the community when he left Plainview on February 28, and that’s who he looked like to Adolph Stoltz when he accepted the deposits from Annette Gorrell at 1:30 PM on the day the bank closed." He also pictured Stoltz as jealous and curious when Sylvester was spending such an ungodly amount of money on his children, his wife and his home, and wanted to know if Sylvester could afford the "splurge" or whether he was forced to borrow money. Then there came the mental picture of the bonds for which he was liable if Sylvester became involved. He found the overdrafts and checked up the sources of the money that went into the account, but never knew that Sylvester was dishonest or stealing money from friends who had entrusted their money to him. That the Sylvester family had no knowledge of his plans and that they feared for his safety was revealed by Stoltz soon after he went on the stand. He declared that Sylvester left the bank on Saturday morning saying that he was going to Minneapolis and would stay at the home of his daughter there. Nothing unusual was suspected until Monday morning when park Sylvester came into the bank and inquired if anything had been heard from his father, saying that he had failed to arrive in Minneapolis. "Mother is hysterical and we fear something has happened to father," he said.
Stoltz averred that he realized that if this knowledge came to the public, resulting in a run on the bank, a collapse was inevitable as at the time they carried considerable paper that could not be negotiated on short notice. Although he did not suspect the true condition he advised the closing of the bank but was overruled by Kennedy. On March 3, he continued working and at 1:30 accepted the deposit of Annette Gorrell. At 2 o’clock, he said, when he could stand the strain of uncertainty no longer, he went home and told his wife that he had quit. Kennedy called him back to the bank to discuss affairs and at 4 o’clock the doors were closed never to open again.
Murdock brought out the facts of Stoltz’s life, showing that contrary to usual procedure of today Stoltz entered the bank with only a seventh grade education. He entered he said at the urgent request of E. L. Sylvester after he had sold his farm and

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moved to town in the spring of 1911. Sylvester called him into the bank he said when he was preparing to move to Canada, where he owned land, having already packed his household goods. After several conferences he purchased $5,000 worth of bank stock for $6,500 and accepted a position in the bank. He was told by Sylvester that his duties at first would be selling insurance and otherwise making himself useful. "I’ll be the boss and you the hired man," he said Sylvester told him.
The trial of G. A. Stoltz, assistant cashier of the closed Plainview State Bank, has been proceeding in district court at Wabasha for a full week with a tedious production of evidence in the form of bank records and their explanation. The selection of a jury was accomplished before the close of the session on last Thursday. The jurors drawn are Jerry Keenan, Kellog; Walter Karstens, Oakwood; F. A. Wasman, Lake City; Frank Carrels, Wabasha; H. J. McDowell, Lake City; James Tittrington, Elgin; Clem Kreye, Hammond; Frank Ryan, Mount Pleasant; Wm. Howatt, Kellogg; Ralph Richardson, Elgin; J. A. Lamey, Kellogg.
With the actual trial of the case starting Friday morning, County Attorney John R. Foley called C. L. Mikkelson, deputy examiner in charge of the bank, to stand and put the presentation of evidence of the bank’s insolvency. Mr. Mikkelson has since that time been almost continuously on the stand. In presenting the books and papers of the bank the state has shown nearly 200 different items in books, notes, deposit slips, checks and other papers.
In stating the case Foley said that they would prove that a loss of $108,489.38 was incurred by the action of the officers of the bank in carrying paid up notes on the books as live assets. He began with testimony by Mr. Mikkelson that the two Sylvesters, Kennedy and Stoltz had notes in the bank totaling $18,000 which were carried as bank assets and were absolutely valueless. These four men also owned all the capital stock of the bank, $30,000 and that when the bank closed the assets listed totaled $698,481. With this beginning Foley then began to show the true condition of the bank. An item in the assets showed $4,179.41 to be due from the Merchants Bank of Winona where as the actual amount due was $2,169.95. This and other items were followed through.
On Saturday morning the prosecution opened its first direct attack on Stoltz. A sheet found in the bank’s papers by the examiners was produced with a list dating back to 1916 of various transactions whereby E. L. Sylvester had replenished his continuously overdrawn personal account. This list was proved to have been made by the defendant, G. A. Stoltz, and was made by him when he realized that Sylvester was drawing large sums of the bank funds. The statement has become known in court as the Sylvester IOU statement and has continually reappeared in the testimony.
In connection with the statement Mikkelson testified and explained from the bank’s ledgers that Sylvester was overdrawn at times as much as $5,000. Stoltz’s list contained a mortgage note of Otto Johnson for $11,000 which, without Johnson’s knowledge the note was sold to Wm. Koenig on Nov. 1, 1917. Johnson paid the bank $5,500 in principal and interest which was not paid to Koenig nor credited to Johnson’s account but was placed in E. L. Sylvester’s account. Sylvester however continued the interest payments to Koenig. This transaction resulted in a loss to the bank of $7,300 all of which was paid to Koenig.
A loss of $8,710 was taken on a note to David Hill for $9,000. Hill went into bankruptcy and only $290 was salvaged in the proceedings. Two notes one of $600 and one of $500 given by Frank Governor were a total loss to the bank when Governor went into bankruptcy. In the same way $300 was lost on a note given by N. T. Evans. Others of the notes listed in the assets were paid up and were as follows: Ida B. and Howard Amos $1,952.32, John Cunningham $700, Dennis Feehan $500, William Krusmark $7,100, Mike Klatt $2,300, John Lee $925 & $1,650, Pat E. Lyons $1,700, Arthur Lawton $200, Walter McNallan $4,500, J. J. Ryan $1,000, John Zimmerman

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$1,200, $1,500, $7,000, Charles Zirbel $2,000, Charles Nienow $3,000, Frank L. Kruger $625, Joseph and George Markus $3,500, A. G. Blowers $850, Dave Hill $8,700, Frank Governor $1,100, N. T. Evans $300, Otto Johnson $5,500, Amos Estate $1,654.15, Winona Merchants Bank draft $2,020.33.
Following is Stoltz’s list of the notes of which Sylvester bolstered up his personal account:

July 15, 1916 $1,654.15 Amos Estate
Sylvester Brothers account March 27, 1917 $850
Hammel Estate Nov. 3, 1917 $1,000
C. Umbreit October 15, 1920 $5,000
Otto Johnson Mortgage July 6, 1921 $5,500
Peter Fender Mortgage March 1, 1922 $2,000
W. J. Stephan June 26, 1922 $2,077.17
P. C. Wood June 29, 1922 $4,800
Susie Weise Mortgage September 27, 1922 $3,000
Mrs. L. R. Bateman Dec. 30, 1922 $7,000
C. Zirbel Mortgage Aug. 13, 1923 $1,500
Paid Mrs. Bateman January 10, 1924
L. D. Colby December 13, 1923 $6,129.66
G. W. French Dec. 12, 1923 $3,534.17
Mrs. Look Dec. 31, 1923 $1,336.12
M. Grieve Dec. 31, 1923 $500
In the fall of 1924 Mr. Mikkelson testified, Christ Umbreit came to Sylvester and asked the payment of a $5,000 personal note that he had given him. Sylvester put him off but in January Umbreit insisted that the note be paid and in order to extricate himself from the difficulty Sylvester gave Umbreit a mortgage for $5,000 of the latter’s son and daughter-in-law, which was held by the bank. In order to square the bank’s records and cover the amount taken from the bank’s assets for his personal use, Sylvester went to the safety deposit box of Mrs. Anna Reich, took out a mortgage amounting to $8,200 and listed it in the bank’s assets. This was $3,200 more than was required and he therefore took of the assets a note for $3,400 signed by Henry and Ella Umbreit. Then the assets were short again, this time to the amount of $200 so he evened things up by making a notation on the note that $200 had been paid on it. County Attorney Foley went into other deals in which similar methods were used in keeping the bank going by "robbing Peter to pay Paul." According to the county records the bank was short $1,482.48 of tax money that it had collected. Its surplus fund which should have been $30,000 at the time of closing was $28,183.84.
Transaction after transaction and records upon records were introduced until the proceedings became dull and tedious, showing the discrepancies of Sylvester in an attempt to show that there was so much of this work going on that anyone working in the bank could not help but know that the bank was insolvent. Records and entries were made by Stoltz but in cross examination Murdoch showed that Stoltz acted the part of a bookkeeper and that in obeying the instructions of a superior might not know the significance of his entries.
The state case is fixed on the IOU statement as the only concrete fact implicating Stoltz. The evidence of witnesses who were customers of the bank has all pointed to the fact that no executive power was delegated to Stoltz, that he never made a loan and never went further than receiving an occasional payment. Mrs. Carley who was employed in the bank for five years, testified that the actual work leveled upon herself and Stoltz and that Stoltz was the first to arrive at the bank in the morning and often worked after the rest had gone home after closing time. He even kept a record of the time that other members spent at things not connected with the bank work. She also testified that

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the management of the bank’s affairs were in the hands of Kennedy and Sylvester exclusively.
The defense scored a point Wednesday when Murdoch pointed out that the indictment mentioned the checks that had been deposited by Miss Gorrell and that none of them had been presented in court. He therefore asked that her testimony and exhibits connected with them be stricken out. The records of the R. E. Jones Co. for whom the money had been deposited showed who had issued the checks and subpoenas were issued that the checks and their makers might appear in court.
In Stoltz’s defense Murdoch expects to call a large number of witnesses and the case will occupy all of the court’s time for this week.
Due to the poor roads only those who have been called to testify have been attending the trial and because of the tedious procedure of piling up evidence of the bank’s insolvency outside interest has not been very great. The mass of testimony and records exhibited makes it impossible to follow and file a full account of the trial.

December 18, 1925-
Jurymen Disagree in Stoltz Case Early Sunday Evening
Jurors Fail to Bring in Verdict After 26 Hours Deliberation
Wabasha, Minn., Dec. 14 – After being out for more than 26 hours the jury in the trial of Adolph Stoltz reported at 8:30 PM Sunday that they were unable to agree on a verdict and were discharged by Judge Karl Finkelnburg.
County Attorney John R. Foley moved at once that the case be tried a second time at this term of the district court, but the court continued the case until the next regular term next May. Stoltz, who is at liberty on $5,000 bail, will be tried at that time on the same indictment under which he was tried at this term, that of receiving a deposit in a bank which he is alleged to have had good reason to know was insolvent, Mr. Foley said. There also are two charges of falsifying bank records pending against him.
The trial, which was in several respects the most unusual in the annals of Wabasha county, lasted for nine days, going to the jury at 6 PM Saturday, after more than half a day had been consumed in the closing arguments of Mr. Foley for the state, J. W. Murdoch for the defense, and the court’s instructions. The jurors almost from the start of the balloting stood 8 to 4 for conviction, it was said, and were divided in the same way when the last ballot was taken.
Seek Further Instructions
Shortly after 2 AM Sunday, it appeared that the jury might reach an agreement when they called for further instructions from the court. Judge Finkelnburg was summoned from the hotel where he had retired when it was evident that there was no immediate prospect of a verdict, and the opposing attorneys, the defendant, and court officers hastily gathered in the court room.
The jurors then inquired of the court whether it would be possible form them to bring in a verdict with a suggestion for clemency or with a recommendation that a fine rather than a prison sentence be imposed. Judge Finkelnburg informed them however, that it was their sole duty to determine the facts in the case and that the matter of punishment, if any were to be fixed, was the function of the court. It was not proper for them to compromise in reaching a decision, he said, and any juror who was convinced that the defendant was not guilty should not vote for conviction. From that time on, it was reported, the jury was hopelessly deadlocked and continued their deliberations for 18 more hours without sleep until they were dismissed.
Attorneys Picture Ruin
Eloquence and persuasiveness featured addresses to the jury of Mr. Foley and Mr. Murdoch, each of whom spoke for nearly two and one-half hours. Each of them made as the background of his plea the contrast between the peace and quiet and safety of the community at Plainview in the early part of the year, and the storm which

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broke when it was found that E. L. Sylvester, president of the Plainview State bank, and the town’s leading citizen, had disappeared and the bank had crashed, carrying with it the funds and savings of many residents of the surrounding countryside.
Mr. Murdoch pointed to the situation as indicating that Stoltz, a minor officer of the bank, and not in the confidence of any of the others, could not be expected to know that Sylvester was a crook and had ruined the bank, when no one else in the village of Plainview or in the state of Minnesota, including highly trained bank examiners, were aware of the fact.
Mr. Foley, on the other hand declared that Stoltz had shown, by the I.O.U statement which he made of Sylvester’s dealings, that he had access to information which was available to but few others and that his special knowledge of conditions in the bank made it impossible for him not to have known that Sylvester had depleted the bank’s assets to the point of insolvency, when he received a deposit two days after the president had disappeared. By remaining silent, he asserted, Stoltz had criminally neglected his duty and had been responsible to a great extent for the sorrow and loss to the depositors, and Sylvester’s successful escape.
Stoltz Not Faultless
"Stoltz does not come in here with clean hands," Mr. Foley declared. "He signed bonds as a freeholder of land and possessed of property in excess of $5,000 at a time when he did not own a foot of land in Minnesota and was practically broke. He had nothing to worry about in signing the bonds – they couldn’t collect anything from him when he didn’t have anything.
"He was the one of whom the responsibility of the bank rested by his own declaration, and yet he tries to tell you he did not know what was going on. He saw money taken out of an estate and put in Sylvester’s checking account, and yet he says he thought he money obtained in that way was ‘borrowings.’ His IOU explanation is ridiculous. How could he be the manager of a creamery, keeping its books and keep all those bank records, if he is so dumb and ignorant as he would have you believe, of course he knew what was going on – he is not telling you the whole story of the plots and intrigues that went on behind the doors of that bank.
"If Stoltz never got a cent out of the bank that is no defense. Like Pilate, he wants to wash his hands of the whole mess. On the day the bank closed, he said, ‘I’m going home,’ and he went home to read, when he knew that in a few hours the whole countryside would be sorrow-stricken realizing that their faith and trust had been violated.
"Stoltz tells you it was all the fault of the other officers and none of his. We can’t get these other men in here. Ed Sylvester has departed for parts unknown. Frank Sylvester has gone down to his grave, and Kennedy is gone. Mrs. Carley, the bookkeeper, is the only one who can come here and look everyone in the face with a clear conscience.
Failed to Protect Relatives
"This man stood idly by and let his own relatives put their money in danger, but he couldn’t have cared much for his relatives or he would not have given them worthless security for his notes. As soon as he heard that Ed. Sylvester had gone he knew his hour had struck, that it was the end of his sorry, sickening mess that had enmeshed the whole countryside. No wonder he got nervous. He knew what had transpired in the bank for years, and that with Ed. Sylvester’s going went the funds of widows and orphans.
"Had he lost all sense of duty for the sake of a few paltry dollars every month, that he could let his friends and neighbors bring their money into a bank that was rotten to the core? If he had done his duty the head of that concern would long since have been behind prison bars. Is it worse to have the brand of criminal stamped across this

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man's brow or to have the faith of the whole countryside violated?’
Mr. Murdoch started by asking that the jury not be swept off their feet by popular clamor or prejudice, and to take themselves back to the atmosphere existing before the crashing of the bank. He asked the jurors not to be swayed by the "inflamed, impassioned address of the county attorney, who sounded," he said, "as though he were on the steps of the bank addressing an angry mob of depositors."
"The closing of the bank was a calamity," Mr. Murdoch said, "like a conflagration or an earthquake, stirring the whole country to its depths. On top of that the president of the bank, the most loved, the most trusted man in the community, had fled with criminal charges hanging over his head.
"In the midst of that atmosphere the grand jury indicted all the officers of the bank, but the atmosphere how has cleared and it is time to take sober, second thought and investigate to what degree, if any, this defendant was responsible. Let us get back and consider the actual charge against this man – that of having received a deposit in a bank he had good reason to know was insolvent.
"It is conceded that he received the deposit and that the bank was insolvent, and the only remaining question then being whether he knew the bank was insolvent. We know today how rotten at the heart Ed Sylvester was, and that instead of being a model of honor and integrity he was a thief at the time he left Plainview, but we must get back to the condition of mind in which the people of Plainview and Adolph Stoltz were before any of these things were uncovered.
"Up to that time that Ed. Sylvester left, not a man, woman, or child questioned the solvency of the bank and for a quarter of a century the president stood as the guardian and confidant of the whole countryside. No one questioned his integrity until the day that he fled. Even Senator Carley, the attorney for the bank and Sylvester, who can smell a rat as far as anyone I know, never got a scent of the stench of Sylvester’s crookedness, for if he had he would have sounded an alarm bell on the streets of Plainview. He seemed, like all the rest, to be hypnotized by this man who was so tall that you could hardly see the top of him.
Stoltz No Super Man
"Yet they say that poor Adolph Stoltz should have known more than anyone else in the state of Minnesota – even more than the trained bank examiners. When Ed. Sylvester had deceived everyone for a quarter of a century, Stoltz should have been the only one to find him out.
"The State of Minnesota is not trying to discharge its bank examiners for incompetency for not sounding the alarm, and for passing the bank as solvent year in and year out, but all it is trying to do is to send Adolph Stoltz, a man with a seventh grade education, to prison for not finding out what the bank examiners failed to discover. That’s al the state is trying to do, but my God, it’s enough."

=== [ 1926 ] ===

January 15, 1926-
Trustee is Ill, Bankrupt Case is Postponed
Hearing in Bankruptcy of E. L. Sylvester, Advanced to January 30th
Illness of C. L. Mikkelson Delays Hearing for Another Week
The hearing in the bankruptcy case of Edwin L. Sylvester scheduled for Saturday Jan. 23, in the United States court at Winona, has been postponed until Jan. 30, on account of the illness of C. L. Mikkelson, trustee in the estate.
The hearing is to be decided whether or not Mrs. Hattie Sylvester, wife of the missing president, shall be given control of the normally exempt personal property and homestead. The bank’s attorneys contend that money wrongfully taken from the bank, and rightly belonging to the depositors was used to develop and purchase this property and that the property should be included in the assets of the closed bank.

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The Plainview State Bank has not yet declared any payments to the depositors.
Mr. Mikkelson’s condition has greatly improved although he is not yet able to resume his work here.

January 30, 1926- The Winona Republican-Herald
E. L. SYLVESTER ARRESTED
FUGITIVE BANK PRESIDENT FOUND AT GULFPORT, MISS.;
IDENTIFICATION ADMITTED
Capture Not Surprise to Authorities
Suspected Man Watched for Weeks
Located after 11 Months Nationwide Search
Traced Through Circulars With Photograph and Communication With Family
Wife in Winona Today for Bankruptcy Hearing
Edwin L. Sylvester was arrested at Gulfport, Miss., late yesterday. A telegram reading "Sylvester arrested. Admits identification" was received by Sheriff Anna Fitzgerald at midnight last night. County Attorney John R. Foley of Wabasha announced today.
The arrest came as the climax of an international manhunt extending over 11 months. Sylvester disappeared from Plainview, Minn., Feb. 28, 1925, three days before the shortage in the funds of the bank totaling more than $200,000 according to C. L. Mikkelson, receiver of the bank, has since developed.
Watched for Weeks
The arrest of Sylvester was not a surprise to Wabasha County authorities. It had been expected for a week by County Attorney Foley, who has been in touch with Mississippi authorities for some time. Foley today refused to disclose where the information leading to the fugitive’s arrest had come from, although he admitted that he had expected the arrest hourly for the past week.
"I cannot tell how we obtained our information except to say that his arrest was effected by circularizing the country and keeping watch on his family," he said.
"I wired the sheriff at Gulfport Friday to arrest the man we believed was Sylvester and there is no doubt in my mind that it is Sylvester, for my wire stated that he had admitted that he is the Plainview man. This search has cost Wabasha county about $2,000."
Communicated With Family
Mr. Foley admitted that Sylvester had communicated with his family at various times and the inference is that it was through this communication that the county attorney was able to trace the elderly banker to Mississippi.
Foley, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald, will leave tonight for Gulfport to return the fugitive to Wabasha.
Details of his arrest were not contained in the telegram. Gulfport is a city of 5,000 inhabitants located near Biloxi, Miss., a winter resort city of 15,000. It is in Harrison county. The country back of the city is undeveloped. The city of Gulfport is mainly a seaport on the Gulf of Mexico and a shipping point.
What Sylvester was doing there and how he happened to be in that section of the United States is still a mystery that will not be solved until Wabasha county authorities reach the city.
Wabasha county authorities have wired the sheriff of Harrison County to hold the prisoner and not permit him to give out any statements until they arrive, which will be about Monday noon. The trip, according to railroad ticket agents, requires about 30 hours.
Wife in Winona

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Meantime this afternoon in Winona, Mrs. Sylvester, wife of the arrested fugitive, will appear before a hearing in United States bankruptcy court here, in her attempt to obtain administration of the property of the banker normally exempt.
Reporters sent by the Republican-Herald to Mrs. Sylvester’s apartment at 3146 Lyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis learned from the janitor that she had left for Winona this morning.
The news of Sylvester’s arrest traveled over the territory like wildfire today. Senator James A. Carley and C. L. Mikkelson, who were in Winona for the bankruptcy hearing this afternoon, were the first residents of Plainview to get the news. The wires have been busy all morning carrying messages to various sections of the territory.
"It’s great work," Senator Carley stated.
Disappearance Baffling
The mystery of Sylvester’s disappearance has been a baffling one. He apparently had dropped out of the world completely. In County Attorney Foley’s office at Wabasha is a file telling of the search. It contains hundreds of reports from detectives who have been watching the Sylvester family and of the running down of rumors from almost every corner of the world.
The investigation at one time last summer was extended to Paris, France. The government agencies have been co-operating extensively. Secret reports signed only by the initials of the operators hare contained in the files.

May hundreds letters have gone out from the county attorney’s office to various parts of the United States. Automobiles have been employed by Burns workers in following the Sylvester family members for weeks. It has undoubtedly been the greatest man hunt in the history of southern Minnesota.
Governor Receives Letter
It was revealed at St. Paul today that on January 2 Governor Theodore Christianson received a letter from G. W. Hoffstetter of Biloxi, Miss., near Gulfport, in which Hoffstetter asked about further information concerning Sylvester. The letter recited that the writer thought he had seen Sylvester in that vicinity. The governor forwarded the letter to County Attorney Foley at Wabasha, but whether this played any part in Sylvester’s capture is not known. After Sylvester’s disappearance, the state offered a reward of $500 for the banker’s apprehension and subsequently Wabasha county announced a similar reward. Governor Christianson announced that he will issue requisition papers to the Wabasha County attorney, John R. Foley, for the return of E. L. Sylvester. The Wabasha attorney was to appear before the governor late today. (NOTE: Article continued on another page that was not among the clipping.)
SYLVESTER CASE IN CHRONOLOGY
Feb. 28 – Edwin L. Sylvester bid family goodbye and leaves Plainview on evening train.

March 4 – Plainview State Bank, of which Sylvester was president, voluntarily closes. Bank examiners begin work.
March 5 – Authorities seek Sylvester arrest for embezzlement.
March 7 – Sylvester traced to Chicago.
March 9 – Warrant issued for Sylvester on embezzlement charge. Shortage placed at $45,000.
March 10 – Wabasha County authorities launch nation-wide search for Sylvester.
March 13 – Unidentified man killed near Lanesboro, not Sylvester. (NOTE: Dr. Slocumb and dentist Dr. E. E. Smith were sent to look at the remains.) Authorities announce that bank irregularities extend over 18 years.
March 19 – Double of Sylvester found near Madison, Wis.

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March 28 – Arthur S. Kennedy, assistant cashier of Plainview State Bank, arrested in connection with irregularities.
April 4 – C. L. Mikkelson named receiver in bankruptcy for Sylvester.
May 9 – Bankruptcy hearing bares Sylvester shortage as $97,000.
May 12 – Grand Jury investigation of Sylvester case begins.
May 15 – Wabasha County grand jury indicts George F. Sylvester, cashier, and Adolph Stoltz and A. S. Kennedy, assistant cashiers of closed bank. Names of victims of shortage made public.
May 18 – G. F. Sylvester, Stoltz, and Kennedy plead not guilty and cases are set for trial at November term.
August 18 – G. F. Sylvester dies suddenly.
Oct. 16 – Citizens of Plainview object to removal of household goods from home at Plainview by Mrs. E. L Sylvester.
Oct. 20 – State offers $500 reward for capture of Sylvester.
Oct. 29 – Wabasha county board increases Sylvester reward to $1,000.
Nov. 7 – Does not know where husband is, Mrs. Sylvester testifies at bankruptcy hearing here. Finances of Sylvester family barred.
Nov. 17 – Adolph Stoltz enters plea of not guilty in bank case.
Nov. 18 – A. S. Kennedy pleads not guilty in bank case. Details revealed of nation-wide hunt for Sylvester by County Attorney J. R. Foley.
Nov. 19 – Stoltz requests appoint of attorney by court.
Nov. 23 – Kennedy trial opens in Wabasha.
Nov. 25 – Kennedy found guilty of falsifying bank records and given indeterminate term in state prison.
Nov. 30 – Stoltz trial opens at Wabasha.
Dec. 4 – Sylvester shortage of $105,489 revealed at Stoltz trial.
Dec. 5 – Stoltz memorandum bares $55,681 additional shortage.
Dec. 12 – Jury in Stoltz trial for receiving deposits in insolvent bank disagrees. Case to be tried again.
Jan. 29, 1926 – Sylvester arrested at Gulfport, Miss.
Have No Statement to Make – Mrs. Sylvester
Wife of Plainview Banker Calmly Receives News of Husband’s Arrest
In city for a Bankruptcy Hearing
"I have no statement to make," Mrs. Hettie Sylvester, wife of Edwin L. Sylvester, fugitive from justice arrested at Gulfport, Miss., stated this noon when approached by reporters of the Republican-Herald, in the lobby of the Hotel Winona.
Mrs. Sylvester appeared calm. She already had received the news of her husband’s arrest. Her attorney J. W. Murdoch, of Wabasha, was with her. They were holding a conference regarding a bankruptcy hearing to be held this afternoon.
A telegram was awaiting Mrs. Sylvester’s arrival at the hotel. Whether this had any bearing on the news of his arrest she would not disclose. However, her attorney J. W. Murdoch, stated that a message from County Attorney John R. Foley, of Wabasha County, had informed her of Sylvester’s arrest.
"I have had enough of this case and don’t want to be involved in it any further."

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Mrs. Sylvester added. Her attorney stated that Mrs. Sylvester knew nothing of the affairs of the bank. He also made it clear that he was representing Mrs. Sylvester and not the man arrested at Gulfport.
Mrs. Sylvester came here from Minneapolis to be present at the hearing this afternoon. The meeting between her and Murdoch had been previously arranged. (NOTE: In another clipping was the following account – Mrs. Sylvester conferred in Winona with her attorney, J. W. Murdoch. Her first knowledge that her husband had been arrested came while she was sitting in the sun parlor of the Hotel Winona Saturday morning awaiting the arrival of Mr. Murdoch. She overheard the conversation of a man washing windows nearby, she revealed to a friend later.
"I was sitting in the parlor," she said, "when some one came in and remarked: ‘Well, they have caught Sylvester.’ The news was such a shock to me that I nearly fainted. I suppose they did not know who I was or they might have been more careful about what they said.")

January 30, 1926 – Rochester Daily Bulletin
E. L. Sylvester, Plainview Banker, Captured in Mississippi Village
Working as Fireman in Hotel When Found; Glad Hunt is Ended
County Attorney Foley Gets News of Capture Friday Night
Will Be Brought Back For Hearing
Arrest Ends Continent-wide Search that Began Last Spring
Gulfport, Miss. January 30 (Special) – Edwin L. Sylvester, missing president of the Plainview State Bank, was arrested by Sheriff Duckworth at Biloxi, Mississippi, last night at 9 PM.
Sylvester was acting as a fireman at the Avon Hotel in that city, having been there for two weeks. He was acting suspiciously, it was said, and someone associated with him reported his case to the sheriff. He was recognized by the sheriff from a picture sent out by the Burns Detective agency.
Sylvester calmly submitted to arrest and admitted his guilt.
He stated that the money had been lost in land speculations. Falling prices had caused him to use additional sums in an attempt to cover up the losses until the illegal transactions could no longer be covered up.
He absconded to escape arrest. Sheriff Duckworth notified the authorities of Wabasha County and told them to come and get him.
Sylvester is in good health, and seems to be glad that the man-hunt is over. He will probably return without requisition papers. He has been on the Mississippi coast for several weeks.
Long Man-Hunt For Banker is Success
The continent-wide hunt for Edwin Sylvester is ended, County Attorney John R. Foley announced today.
Sylvester is in the hands of authorities in Gulfport, Mississippi, awaiting the arrival of authorities to take him back home, where he must face charges of embezzling $120,000 from the Plainview bank.
A telegram received last night by County Attorney Foley from the sheriff at Gulfport read: "Sylvester arrested, admits identity."
County Attorney Leaves to Bring Sylvester Back
The county attorney, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff Ed. Fitzgerald, left Wabasha today for Minneapolis to take a train for Chicago. From Chicago they will go to Gulfport to bring the missing banker back to Minnesota to face charges. At St. Paul County Attorney Foley visited the governor’s office to secure the necessary papers to assure Sylvester’s extradition.
County Attorney Foley declined to disclose how he had traces Sylvester to Gulfport. "I cannot tell how we obtained our information, except to say that his arrest

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was effected by circularizing the country and keeping a close watch on his family, living in Minneapolis," he said. "I wired the sheriff at Gulfport Friday to arrest a man we believed was Sylvester, and there is no doubt in my mind that it is Sylvester, for my wire states he is the Plainview man.
County Spent $2,000 in Nation-wide Hunt
"The search has cost Wabasha County $2,000." The county attorney also declined to state who would receive the reward, saying that it would be announced later. Mr. Foley promised to divulge, on his return, further details of the search that spread over the United States and into foreign countries.
Mr. Foley admitted today that Mr. Sylvester had communicated with his family at various times and the inference is that it was through this communication that the county attorney was able to trace the elderly banker to Mississippi.
It was revealed today that on January 2, Governor Theodore Christianson received a letter from G. W. Hoffstetter, of Biloxi, Miss., near Gulfport, in which Hoffstetter asked about further information concerning Sylvester. The letter reiterated that the writer thought he had seen Sylvester in that vicinity.
The governor forwarded the letter to County Attorney Foley at Wabasha, but whether this played an important part in Sylvester’s capture is not known.
After Sylvester’s disappearance, the state offered a reward of $500 for the banker’s apprehension and subsequently Wabasha county announced a similar reward.
Governor Announced He Will Issue the Papers
Governor Christianson announced that he will issue requisition papers to the Wabasha county attorney, John R. Foley, for the return of E. L. Sylvester.
It is expected that the deputy and the county attorney will return with the prisoner the latter part of next week.
The international search for Sylvester began in earnest four days after he disappeared last February, when the bank closed its doors voluntarily and banking department examiners started an investigation that disclosed shortages approximating $120,000.
The county authorities, including Mrs. Edward Fitzgerald, Wabasha county’s sheriff, and county attorney, planned the search with the help of detective agencies, that eventually sent descriptive circulars and pictures to every city of size in America and Canada.
Repeated reports were received of the death of some unidentified man, either at some point in Minnesota or in other parts of the Northwest and officials were sent out on "Wild Goose" chases.
Believed Man Killed By Train was Banker
When an unidentified man was killed by a train near Lanesboro last March 13th, the report went out that it was E. L. Sylvester. Several Plainview citizens went to Lanesboro and viewed the body in the morgue. Some of them said it was the missing banker, while others insisted it was not. In general appearance the body resembled Sylvester, but certain identifying marks were lacking which convinced the authorities it was not the fugitive.
Mrs. Sylvester continued to remain uninfluenced by reports of the death of her husband, insisted that she believed him to be alive.
There were no circumstances, to warrant suspicion when the venerable Plainview Man – a leader in social, civic, and business affairs of the community – said goodbye to his family and took a train, presumably for the cities.
But when a day or two went by and nothing was heard from him, and when it was learned that he had failed to appear at the home of his daughter in Minneapolis, whom he had intended to visit, his family became worried.
Doors of Bank Closed Voluntarily March 4

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on March 4, four days after he disappeared, the Plainview State Bank was voluntarily closed and state examiners came to Plainview to begin work. On the following day the search for Sylvester was placed in the hands of authorities.
On March 9 a warrant was issued for Sylvester, charging embezzlement. The shortage then was placed at $45,000. Later further investigation brought to light more shortages until the total amounted to $120,000.
According to records in the office of A. J. Viegal, commissioner of banks, it is charged that Sylvester took mortgage loan papers of depositors from safety deposit boxes and placed them in the bank as assets and appropriated the proceeds therefrom.
On March 19 Sylvester’s double was located near Madison, Wis. The rumor that this man was Sylvester came from a small boy, living in a town near Madison, who had frequently visited relatives in Plainview and who had often seen Sylvester. The boy saw a man in a restaurant who looked like the missing banker. The authorities took the trail, but found the man was not the missing banker, although there was a striking similarity in appearance.
On March 27, Arthur S. Kennedy, former Rochester man, was arrested on a charge of embezzlement and on May 12 the Wabasha County grand jury met to begin its investigation into alleged irregularities in connection with the closing of the bank.
Officers of Bank Under Indictment

May 14 the grand jury returned indictments against E. L. Sylvester, his brother, George Sylvester, Arthur S. Kennedy and Adolph Stoltz. Some time later George Sylvester died at Plainview. Last November Arthur S. Kennedy was tried on a charge of making false entries in the bank’s records. He was found guilty by a jury at Wabasha and was sentenced to the state penitentiary. He is now serving his sentence there.
Shortly after his trial came the trail of Adolph Stoltz, assistant cashier. The case lasted more than a week, and much sensational evidence of Sylvester’s peculiarities was introduced during the trial. Many transactions by which Sylvester acquired funds were gone over in great detail and explained to the jury. The jury disagreed however, and County Attorney Foley announced he would try Stoltz again next May. Stoltz was charged with accepting deposits in the institution while knowing it to be insolvent.
On November 7, at Winona, bankruptcy proceedings were heard before Herbert M. Bierce, referee in bankruptcy at Winona. At this time sensational disclosures were made by Senator James Carley representing the bank’s depositors. He revealed, among other things, the amount of money spend by Mrs. Sylvester and by her son Edwin and went into great detail.
Keep Sylvester Away From Here Says Plainview
Plainview Folk "Tickled" at News of Capture of Missing Banker
"They’d better not bring Sylvester back to Plainview." This is the threat made in the village of Plainview today when its citizens learned that Edwin L. Sylvester, their banker, who is alleged to have embezzled approximately $120,000 of the bank’s funds, was captured last night at Gulfport, Mississippi.
The town of Plainview was jubilant over the news of Sylvester’s apprehension. As soon as word was received is spread like wildfire, and in a few moments everyone was talking about it.
"It’s the best news we’ve heard in a long time," said one citizen. "We’re all tickled down here."
Some of the citizens were inclined not to believe the report when it was first received. "It’s only another rumor," they said.
"Don’t Give Him Bail"
But when confirmation came from County Attorney John R. Foley, the man who has been behind the search for the missing banker, the citizens were gratified and


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jubilant.
"I hope they don’t give him any bail," said one townsman. "I hope they slap him into prison and keep him there."
When the news of what had happened to the Plainview bank was first published last March, the citizens of Plainview were stunned. They could not believe that the man who had loomed so tall among them could do anything wrong. Sylvester had a hand in everything. He was the most trusted man in town. He was executor and administrator for scores of estates. Widows came to him to have him take charge of their meager property and his friends appointed him guardian over their children’s estates. No on in the village was more honored and looked up to.
Sylvester’s Work Revealed
Then came revelation after revelation. As the bank examiners delved into the tangled affairs of the institution they unearthed an odorous mess – the work of Edwin L. Sylvester.
It was weeks and months before the citizens really began to believe that Sylvester was a thief and a crook – that he had stolen money from his best friends, and from the widow and children of men who had placed their trust in him.
The climax came at the trial of A. G. Stoltz, assistant cashier, when all the facts that had been unearthed by the bank examiners were laid before the jury at Wabasha.
Details of transactions so enormously fraudulent as to be almost unbelievable were laid bare. The exact method Sylvester used in robbing his friends was described step by step.
The citizens of Plainview read of these transactions and the sorrow they had felt at first, which had subsequently merged into suspicion and anger, became blind, mad hatred.
Rumor Says Sylvester Wired Asking for Delay in Hearing
Wife Bears News of Arrest Bravely
Mrs. Sylvester Refuses to see Press – Gets Wire from Husband
Shocked and badly shaken, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, wife of the former president of the defunct Plainview State bank, learned the details of her husband’s capture at Gulfport, Mississippi when she arrived in Winona this morning from Minneapolis to be present at the bankruptcy hearing, scheduled for this afternoon before Herbert M. Bierce, referee in bankruptcy.
A telegram which arrived sometime during the night awaited Mrs. Sylvester at Winona. The telegram from her husband to Mrs. Sylvester read: "Am under arrest. Postpone bankruptcy hearing."
The wife of the Plainview banker who was to seek this afternoon to have sustained her petition to set aside the bankruptcy proceedings involving the homestead and furniture normally exempt, bore upon bravely under the blow, shocked as she must have been.
Postponement Seen
There were indications at noon that the bankruptcy hearing might be postponed, partly at the request of Senator James Carley, attorney for the bank depositors, and partly at the request of E. L. Sylvester himself.
According to reports, Sylvester telegraphed County Attorney John R. Foley asking that the hearing be postponed until he arrives to testify himself. And Mr. Carley was not only willing to agree to such a postponement, but virtually demanded it.
"I was to get Sylvester where I can examine him," he declared. "I want to ask him several things."
Murdoch Undecided
J. W. Murdock of the Wabasha law firm of Murdoch and Lothrop, representing

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Mrs. E. L Sylvester, was not so certain at noon that he would agree to a postponement. He declared, however, that if the request was made on reasonable grounds, and if the reason put forward were sufficient, he would agree to it.
Herbert M. Bierce, bankruptcy referee, could not say definitely at noon what might happen to the hearing when it opened at 1:30. "Of course I do not know," he said, "but there are indications that a postponement will be sought, and perhaps it will be granted."
Mrs. Sylvester Silent
At Winona today Mrs. Sylvester remained in seclusion, refusing to see reporters and refusing to give out any statement.
If it is true that E. L. Sylvester wants to be present at the bankruptcy hearing, which has already been postponed several times, there is every assurance that when it is ultimately held, there will be many startling disclosures.
The revelations made by Senator Carley several months ago, when made public a statement showing where much of the bank’s money had gone aroused considerable excitement.
Doubt, however, was expressed in some quarters today, that Sylvester would ever take the stand in the bankruptcy case.

February 1, 1926 – Winona Republican-Herald
Carelessness of Sylvester Led to Arrest
Return to Biloxi After Warning That Officers Were Training Him, He Says
Jumped From Place to Place Getting Letters
Mind is Hazy of Wanderings
Gulfport, Miss., Feb. 1 – Carelessness in his method of concealing his whereabouts led to Edwin L. Sylvester’s arrest here last Friday evening. If he had followed the method that had given him his liberty for ten months since the time of warrant for his arrest was sworn out by the Minnesota banking department he would still be a fugitive from justice.
However, Sylvester made his fatal mistake by becoming careless in his plan. He had come back to Biloxi after being warned that the officers were on his track again and after he had once moved on.
Sylvester revealed this today to Sheriff Frank Duckworth of Harrison county, the man who arrested him while he was shoveling coal in the engine room of the Avon Hotel Friday night.
Mind Hazy on Wanderings
"Since I have been away," Sylvester said, "I have received letters from relatives in Minneapolis, St. Paul and Plainview, but I moved as soon as I got a letter. My family did not know where I was. I was in Biloxi two months ago but I left when I learned that officers were on my track again. I have lived for months watching the faces of others. I came back here two weeks ago and went to work at the hotel. That was where I made my mistake. However I am glad it is all over."
Sylvester would not discuss where he had been since he boarded the Pioneer Limited at Winona, Minn. on the evening of Feb. 28, a year ago.
"I can hardly tell where I’ve been al these months that the Wabasha county authorities have been searching for me," he said, "I went first to Chicago but learned that the officers were on my track. I do not remember where I went, I was so weak and ill when I left Plainview. My only thought was to get away and forget it all. I had been in hell for months, knowing the shortage was there and was bound to be discovered."
Sylvester’s plan which was successful for months in throwing Burns detectives off his trail, was one followed by many criminals. As soon as he came into

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communication with friends he would immediately board a train and move. This would leave the detectives in the dark when they tracked the letters addressed to him.
To Find Changed Man
When County Attorney John R. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Ed. Fitzgerald meet Sylvester in the officer of Sheriff Duckworth here this afternoon, they will find a changed Sylvester.
Instead of the man who had the confidence of the entire Minnesota community, walked with his head erect and dressed in the clothes of a prosperous business man, they will find a bent and feeble old man, with white hair and calloused hands, dressed in the clothes of a hotel fireman.
What Sylvester will tell the Minnesota authorities is not known, but from the statements he has made so far, it is apparent that he will make a clean breast of everything and aid the authorities in cleaning up the tangled affairs of the closed bank.
He readily admitted the shortage in the funds of the bank but declared that the shortage was much less than claimed by Minnesota authorities.
"The losses were occasioned by land speculations," he said. "I purchased the land for purposes of speculation and a declining marked brought about trouble. When the decline became so pronounced that an early improvement in the market seemed unlikely, I used the bank funds to cover it up."
Puts Shortage at $60,000
Sylvester placed the actual shortage at about $60,000 or about one third of the amount that Minnesota banking officers stated has been discovered.
The matter of who will receive the reward for the information leading to Sylvester’s arrest is a question here. The news of his whereabouts was doubtless first carried to Minnesota Governor Christianson of that state, by G. W. Huffstetter, a local businessman. Mr. Huffstetter, however prefers not to discuss the matter until he talks with County Attorney Foley upon his arrival here this afternoon.
See Untangling of Affairs
Plainview, Minn. Feb. 1 – On the face of information coming out of Gulfport Miss., where Edwin L. Sylvester was arrested, prospects today are brighter than they have been for months for a speedy untangling of the affairs of the closed Plainview State Bank.
Three outstanding developments in the last 24 hours lead men close to the affairs of the bank to be very optimistic here today. They are as follows:
First – That Sylvester is ready to talk and has already admitted the shortage, although he states that it will only be about $60,000.
Second – That Sylvester has been in touch with what has happened here since his disappearance through letters and newspaper clippings sent by his family and friends.
Third – That many matters in question, which may increase the assets of the closed bank, can easily be untangled by the missing president, who had charge of marking most of the loans of the bank.
Plainview today has settled down after Saturday’s excitement to await word from County Attorney John R. Foley regarding the details of Sylvester’s statement. The town had a general celebration Saturday night.
To Arrive Last of Week
Wabasha, Minn. Feb. 1 – E. L. Sylvester will not arrive here until the latter part of the week Friday or Saturday, Deputy Sheriff John Jacobs stated this morning. County Attorney John R. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald expected to reach Gulfport tonight. No additional information regarding Sylvester has been received by Wabasha County authorities.
Wife Returns Home
At the conclusion of the bankruptcy hearing here Saturday, Mrs. Hettie Sylvester,

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wife of the former Plainview banker, returned to her home in Minneapolis it was stated this morning at the residence of P. H. Smith, 227 West Fifth Street.
Mrs. Sylvester had received a telegram from her husband stating that he had been arrested and urging her to have the hearing postponed until his arrival. Mrs. Sylvester did not state whether she planned to meet Mr. Sylvester at Wabasha upon his return.

February 3, 1926- Rochester Post Bulletin
Worked in Fields As A Laborer;
Ate Meals With Negro Workmen;
Betrayed by a Farmer for $1,000
Brown Bag and Bundle of Work Clothes His only Baggage When Taken into Custody
Tells of Labor in Cotton Fields at $1 a Day
Expected to Return to Wabasha With Authorities Friday Night
Truck Farmer for Whom He Worked Betrayed Him to Authorities After He Refused to Buy Farm
Asks About Life in Prison
A farmer friend who, Judas-like, betrayed him to the authorities for a $1,000 reward, was responsible for the arrest of Edwin L. Sylvester, absconding president of the defunct Plainview State Bank.
This was the bitter story the aged banker told to reporters as he sat in his cell in the Parish prison in New Orleans this morning, waiting to begin the second lap of the long journey that will bring him back to Wabasha county Friday to stand up before the bar of justice.
While Story of Wanderings Revealed
In a special dispatch to the Post-Bulletin from New Orleans this morning, the whole story of Sylvester’s wandering, his trials and hardships, and his final capture after the man he thought was his friend game him away, was revealed for the first time.
His story disclosed how the one time prominent citizen of Plainview worked for a dollar a day as fireman at the Avon Hotel at Biloxi, Miss., how he tended gardens and peddled vegetables and how he ate his meals in a kitchen with the colored help.
Lived the Life of a Common Laborer
Almost from the time he fled from Plainview just before his bank closed its doors forever last March, the fastidious, reputedly wealthy banker lived the life of a common laborer and suffered mental and physical trials that left him more bent and careworn than even his 66 years would account for.
Sylvester was taken into custody of Minnesota authorities at three o’clock yesterday afternoon at Gulfport. Deputy Ed Fitzgerald and County Attorney John R. Foley arrived in Gulfport at 11:30 in the morning from the state capital, where they had secured from the governor the papers necessary to assure Sylvester’s extradition.
When the Wabasha county officials went to the jail they were received by Sheriff Frank Duckworth, the man who had arrested Sylvester and were escorted by him to the jail where Sylvester sat behind the bars.
"Hello, Ed," said County Attorney Foley, reaching his hand through the bars.
Smiles at Officers
Sylvester gave the officer a smile and a warm hand clasp.
"Hello, John," he said. Then a similar greeting was exchanged between Sylvester and Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald.
"Well," said the county attorney, "We are here."
"I see you are," said Sylvester with a smile.
Sylvester expressed a willingness to go with the officers without questioning the requisition papers, but Sheriff Duckworth interfered, and for a few moments it appeared as if a legal delay was going to block the departure of the authorities and their captive for home.

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Sheriff Wanted Reward
The Gulfport Sheriff demurred, then hesitated and finally announced he wasn’t sure he’d let Sylvester go. He claimed a share of the $1,000 reward and threatened to question the extradition papers.
County Attorney Foley took the sheriff aside and explained to him that neither he nor Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald had anything to do with payment of the reward, Sheriff Duckworth consulted a Gulfport attorney, and finally, with reluctance, gave Sylvester up to the Wabasha county officials.
County Attorney Foley and Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald at once made speedy preparations for departure, fearing Sheriff Duckworth might change his mind. They took the first trains for New Orleans and arrived there last evening.
Prisoner Not Handcuffed
No handcuffs were put on the prisoner, and as they left for the depot, they resembled nothing so much as three jolly tourists. When they departed, Sylvester exchanged farewells with other prisoners in the jail, and said goodbye to the sheriff and his family and to Gulfport newspaper men who had interviewed him for the Post-Bulletin.
Sylvester expressed himself as being glad the manhunt was over, and thanked Sheriff Duckworth and his wife for the kind treatment received while he was in jail. In turn the sheriff assured the aged banker that he had been a model prisoner and had created a very favorable impression while in jail.
When the two authorities and their prisoner arrived in New Orleans Sylvester begged to be allowed to say at the hotel last night.
Can’t Stand Jail Life
"I can’t stand this jail life," he told his guards, "It’s awful."
The county attorney and the deputy sheriff refused to listen to him, however, and took him to the Parish jail where he was locked up for the night. Once in his cell, Sylvester chatted amiably with the Wabasha county officials and with New Orleans newspapermen sent to the prison to interview him for the Post-Bulletin.
As he sat in the cell, Sylvester, sunburned from the months spent in the South, looked like a tourist who had been ordered by his physician to stay in the open.
Tells of Betrayal
Nonchalantly Sylvester said of traveling over the entire South for several months to evade capture. But his voice grew bitter and anger showed in his eyes when he told of the betrayal that led to his apprehension.
The "Judas" who betrayed him was George W. Hoffstetter of Gulfport, Mississippi, Sylvester said.
The aged banker told newspapermen that he left Plainview last February 28 and went to Winona. From Winona he took a train to Chicago; and when he learned that the authorities had tracked him there and were on his trail he went to Cleveland. Then he went south, working as a laborer in sawmills and cotton field in Alabama and Mississippi.
Settled on Truck Farm
Finally he settled on the Hoffstetter farm near Gulfport. Hoffstetter treated him kindly and he thought the genial farmer was a friend.
Hoffstetter listened interestedly when Sylvester poured out to him the whole story of his troubles. The Hoffstetter tried to sell Sylvester his farm and when the former banker refused to buy it, Hoffstetter took advantage of his confidence "simply" Sylvester said, "because he wanted to make a paltry thousand dollars."
During all the months that he was a fugitive from justice, Sylvester traveled under the alias of Samuel L. Edwin. He looks thinner and older after his long flight, but appears to be in good health.

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Earned a Dollar a Day
Sylvester was earning a dollar a day when he was arrested while working as a fireman in the Avon Hotel at Biloxi after he had left the Hoffstetter farm. While he was holding his job, Sylvester ate his meals in the hotel kitchen with the colored help.
According to County Attorney Foley, in a message to the Post-Bulletin, Sylvester told him that after he left Ohio he went directly to Chattanooga, Tenn., where he spent one night. Then he went to Birmingham, Ala., and left there immediately for Biloxi, Miss. arriving there on March 4.
Delivered Vegetables
On March 27, Sylvester went to work for Hoffstetter on his truck farm two miles from Biloxi. He tended the gardens and peddled vegetables. Perhaps the extensive knowledge of truck farming and vegetable farm lands gained in Plainview as a help to him in Mississippi. Anyway, he worked daily in the gardens under the hot southern sun and delivered vegetables to stores in Biloxi and Gulfport and to the back doors of private residences just as farmers had, not so many months before, delivered vegetables to the back door of his palatial home in Plainview.
For three months Sylvester stayed with Hoffstetter. Then he left him and went to work in a sawmill near Waynesboro, Mississippi, where he stayed three weeks. When he quit the sawmill he went to Lucedale, Miss. where he worked as a farm laborer for nearly five months.
Worked in Cotton Fields
Tiring of the farm labor, Sylvester got a job in the cotton fields, and he picked cotton for two months, getting an average of a dollar a day for that work. His age militated against him, and he couldn’t work as fast as the sweating Negroes beside whom he labored.
He gave up cotton picking and went to work in a cement block factory for a short time. Then he went back to the Hoffstetter farm and returned to common labor-grubbing in the fields.
It was during this last experience on the truck farm that Hoffstetter turned against him. Seeing his danger, Sylvester left the farm and went to work in the hotel boiler room at Biloxi. It was here that he made his mistake. Had he vanished entirely from that section of the country, he might still be at large today.
Silent about Bank Affairs
According to County Attorney Foley, Sylvester was very reluctant to discus the affairs of the Plainview Bank. In fact, it was with the greatest difficulty that the county attorney drew the elderly banker the story of his travels during the time he was a fugitive.
Sylvester’s clothes are shabby and torn, and his baggage consists of a brown bag and bundle of work clothes tied in a khaki cloth. There is little about him that resembles the important citizen and banker of Plainview who less than a year ago, was guiding the affairs of the town serving on important committees acting as guardian of the estates of children and an administrator of the estates of widows.
Interested in Southern Land
During the months that he wandered the Gulf, Sylvester became closely acquainted with conditions in the south. He told county attorney Foley of fishing on the Gulf, and spoke familiarly of the land situation of Gulfport and Biloxi. His interest in land deals, it was such deals that got him into trouble at Plainview, was revealed when he told the county attorney that he could have made considerable money in Mississippi land.
The county attorney, the deputy sheriff and their prisoner left New Orleans at 12:30 this noon and will arrive in Chicago tomorrow. They expect to take a train from Chicago Friday morning, arriving in Wabasha Friday night.

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Asks About Prison Life
According to the county attorney, Sylvester has not stated to him what his plea will be. He has inquired several times, however, about prison conditions.
The bank president in overalls would neither admit nor deny, in his cell in the Parish prison in New Orleans, that he had absconded with $100,000 of the Plainview Bank funds.
The indictment carried by County Attorney Foley and Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald to gain the necessary extradition papers charges Sylvester on one specific count of taking a $500 deposit from Elizabeth Allen of Plainview and failing to enter it in the records of the Plainview Bank.

February 3, 1926- Winona Republican Herald
Tells of Work as Laborer in Cotton Fields
Glittering "Romance" of Luxury With Stolen Funds
Shattered by Aged Ex-Banker’s Story of Poor Old Man Cast Adrift
Spent Entire Time in South
New Orleans, LA. Feb. 3 – The glittering romance that the people back home in Minnesota had built around Edwin L. Sylvester, alleged wrecker of the Plainview Sate Bank, was shattered here today.
Instead of living a life of luxury in hotels for the past ten months, and spending the money he had taken from his friends and depositors of the bank, Sylvester had sunk to the depths of a common laborer in the south, who lived and ate with Negroes and picked cotton in the fields at a dollar a day.
The story of his life from the time he left Chicago nearly a year ago is just a tale of a penniless man, thrown out on the world without friends, to battle his way unaided and hunted halfway round the world.
It is told late yesterday in little bits, between tears and smiles, as the white-haired man of 65 sat in a day coach of a train between County Attorney John R. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald of Wabasha, on the way from Gulfport, Miss., where he had been arrested to New Orleans.
Used Name of Edwin
Under the name of Samuel L. Edwin, the internationally hunted fugitive arrived at Biloxi, Miss. March 4, 1925, the day the Plainview State Bank voluntarily closed its doors back home.
After leaving Plainview on Saturday February 28, he had gone to Chicago but immediately left for Cincinnati, where he remained one night. The next day he went to Chattanooga Tenn., where he remained another night. From Chattanooga he went to Birmingham and on to Biloxi arriving there March 4.
"I wandered around Biloxi like a lost man for days," he told County Attorney Foley, "looking for work and a place to live but on March 27 I secured work with Mr. Hoffstetter on his truck farm two miles from Biloxi, tending gardens and peddling vegetables. Here I remained for three months."
Hoffstetter is the man who wrote Governor Christianson that Sylvester was in Biloxi, and who will probably get the $1,000 reward offered for his capture.
Found Work Too Hard
At the end of three months Sylvester, or Edwin as he was known there, secured a job in a sawmill near Waynesboro, Miss., but the work was too hard for the bent old man. He could not keep pace with the Negroes with whom he was working and was let go after three weeks. Sylvester then secured a job as a farm laborer near Lucedale, Miss. where he worked for five months. This work at first was hard, but agreed with him and he soon gained back some of his old strength.

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Then the cotton crop harvest came, Sylvester went out under the boiling sun with the Negroes in the cotton fields and picked cotton. He worked at this for two months, helping to reap the big cotton crop of Mississippi. He told the officers that he averaged a dollar a day at this work and thought he had done "pretty good."
At the close of the cotton harvest Sylvester went to work in a cement block factory shoveling sand and carrying the heavy blocks.
When this work was completed he again went back to Mr. Hoffstetter and secured a job grubbing a piece of ground and doing other common labor about the farm.
Then came the job at the Hotel Avon, which was the best he had held since coming to the south. Here he was a fireman at a dollar a day, living and eating with the Colored help in the hotel kitchen and here it was where Sheriff Duckworth found him, when he was instructed by a telegram from County Attorney Foley to arrest the man known as Edwin who worked at the Avon Hotel. Sylvester had been employed there for two weeks.
Dislikes Jail Life
"Sylvester dislikes jail life exceedingly," County Attorney Foley said today, "and begged to be permitted to stay at a hotel last night but we locked him up in a parish jail here." He is much thinner and older in appearance than when he left Plainview. His clothes are shabby and his baggage consists of the little brown bag that aided authorities in Winona to trace him to Chicago and a bundle of work clothes tied in a khaki cloth like the Negroes tie theirs when they move from place to place.
The Wabasha county authorities, according to County Attorney Foley, encountered some difficulties in getting Sylvester from Sheriff Duckworth at Gulfport.
"The sheriff hesitated to release him," Foley said, "claiming a share of the reward and threatening to question the extradition papers we had. When told we had nothing to do with the payment of the reward he consulted an attorney and reluctantly let Sylvester go. We departed at once from Gulfport" Foley added with a smile, "for fear the sheriff might change his mind."
Reluctant on Bank Affairs
"I don’t know what Sylvester’s plea will be. He is very reluctant when it comes to discussing bank affairs. In fact it was difficult to get any details out of him. The facts about his travels came piece meal."
He inquired about prison conditions, Mr. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald stated, asking about Stillwater several times on the trip from Gulfport to here.
"He likes to talk about fishing on the gulf," Foley added, "and told us about the land situation at Gulfport and Biloxi, stating that he could have made considerable money in land there."
The Wabasha authorities with their prisoner will leave New Orleans today at 12:30 PM on the Illinois Central for Chicago where they are due to arrive Thursday night. They will leave Chicago over the Milwaukee road Friday morning and reach Wabasha that evening.

February 4, 1926- Winona Republican Herald
Wife and Son Help to Plan Flight
Claim Took $443 When He Left, Little Booklet Shows
Admits Irregularities go Back 25 Years
Received 12 Letter from Family, Wrote 8
Sylvester Party in Chicago Today
On board train with Sylvester party enroute to Chicago Thursday noon – The mystery surrounding Edwin L. Sylvester’s letters to his family, his method of communication with them and some of the puzzling details in connection with the closing of the bank were cleared up today.

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Under the strain of the past few days, Sylvester has broken down, and today is talking quite freely about the bank, its affairs and his past life.
The break came late yesterday afternoon when the "gray man from Plainview" cried like a child. He has been in tears several times since.
As the train speeds on to Chicago, County Attorney John R. Foley is getting details after detail of his confession which when completed will doubtless clear up every puzzling particular on the bank’s affairs.
"The first irregularities or defalcations in the records of the Plainview State Bank," he told Foley, "occurred prior to the organization of the bank as a state bank." This statement checks with records of the bank as disclosed by banking experts shortly after the closing of the Sylvester bank.
"I had planned on going away for about three months," Sylvester continued. "My wife and daughter in St. Paul and my son Edwin knew my plans. We had discussed them and worked them out in detail."
Wife Knew of Break
"My wife knew when the final break came. She knew when I left to make my getaway. I was like a scared rabbit. I didn’t know where to go until I was on the train, and then I didn’t decide to go to Mississippi until after I reached Chicago."
The Wabasha county officers yesterday in going through Sylvester’s belongings found a memo book. It was hidden in one of his old clothes pockets. It was a secret detailed account of his activities since he left Plainview. It showed in detail each item of expense he has incurred, and the amount of money he had when he left and his earnings day by day.
Had $443 When he Left
"Amount when I left Plainview $443" reads the first item in the book. He had previously told newspapermen that he had less than $100 when he ran away.
Then detail by detail is set down with pencil or pen and ink – little notations about his whereabouts from Feb. 28, the day he vanished until May 6 of last year. The officers today are hoping to find the second volume of the little book.
One of the most interesting items in the book is the detail about the mail he received from home. The book shows that he had received 12 letters since he left and that he has written eight to his family. The letters sent home were sent via "White Bros," according to County Attorney Foley. (NOTE: Later it was found that it was White Bear – a place in Minnesota, not White Bros.) When arrested Sylvester had $90 in his pockets.
White Brothers Unknown
Plainview, Minn., Feb. 4 – The White Brothers referred to as the connecting link between Sylvester and his family in writing to and from Gulfport are unknown in this city. The post office here has no record of any people or firm by that name in their directory.
The Plainview State Bank was organized as a state bank in 1906 which according to Sylvester’s confession shows that his irregularities go back more than 25 years in the bank’s history.
"Not for Myself"
On board Illinois Central Train enroute to Chicago, Wednesday Afternoon – Word by word, sentence by sentence County Attorney John R. Foley is getting the inside story of the failure of the Plainview State bank out of Edwin L. Sylvester. The gray man, who was one "our E. L." in the Plainview community but now a confessed thief, is telling the tale in little bits. Foley and Sylvester sat for hours yesterday on the train and talked.
"I didn’t do it for myself," Sylvester would repeat over and over again, when Foley’s leading questions got too strong for the old man. "I did it to save the bank," Sylvester would say. "I failed. Bad loans had ruined the bank. I was the bank tottering. I saw my life wrecking to pieces."
Sylvester would then lean back in his seat. He is only a derelict now. His shoes

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are broken. His shirt has no collar and his clothing is hanging in baggy shape on his skinny figure.
"Couldn’t Face People"
"I couldn’t face the people the way they would look at me in Plainview," he would continue, "When they learned their savings were lost, so I took all the resources of the bank I could reach and invested them in improved farm lands at the time there was a boom up there. I thought the land would increase in value. I paid $200 per acre for some of the farms. You know the bottom fell out, John. Those farms dropped to $100 an acre. I couldn’t face my friends so I run away."
Sylvester has made this statement many times in the last 48 hours. It is no longer news to the little group that is bringing him back to Minnesota.
Loyal to Family
His loyalty to his family is remarkable. Note one speck of blame has the old man placed on their heads. He has not mentioned the expensive living as disclosed in Winona by Senator James A. Carley, from bank records after the first bankruptcy hearing in an interview given the Republican-Herald. He almost refused to talk about his own bank account.
"I had less than $100 in my pocket when I fled," he told Foley. "It was on Feb. 28, 1925 when I first knew the bank was doomed." I started for Florida but on the train I thought of the many northern people there and changed my route to Biloxi.
Must Face it All
Sylvester has not yet been told that banking experts traced his shortage back 22 years, and are very well acquainted with the methods he employed. He doesn’t know that Senator Carley has evidence to prove that he had planned to leave Plainview three months earlier than he really did.
He likes to tell newspapermen of his rise from a bookkeeper working for $200 a year to the presidency of a bank, of his standing in the community, his church membership, and his Sunday School Classes.
"Now of course I’ve got to go back and face it all," Sylvester concludes. "It makes me sick just to think of those folks among whom I spent my life. It makes me even sicker to think of my wife and children and the shame they will see. I didn’t do it for myself," he would repeat, "I tried to save the bank, and save the people who had invested money in it and the depositors who had put their money in it."
Nothing for Myself
"I got nothing out of it myself. It’s just a horrible nightmare from the time things began to go wrong. But as far as any dishonesty out of which I was to profit myself, I am innocent."
Foley would then leave him in Deputy Sheriff Ed. Fitzgerald’s care, and go to the smoker apparently to think some more. In a few minutes he would return and the same story would be gone over again.
Sylvester’s complete confession will come at any hour now. The authorities will doubtless have it before the party reaches Chicago.
Hoffstetter tells Story
Gulfport, Miss., Feb. 4 – G. W. Hoffstetter, the man who gave the information that led to Edwin L. Sylvester’s arrest today told how it all happened.
"This man was working for me on my truck farm," Hoffstetter said. "He came along and asked me for work and I gave it to him. He never seemed like other floaters and I was interested in him and watched him. Something about him always seemed queer."
"One day I was reading a Minneapolis paper. I used to live up there, and I have read the paper ever since. There was a story about a banker named Edwin L. Sylvester, who had disappeared from his home and who was wanted on a charge of embezzling

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some of the bank’s money.
Mail from Minnesota
The very next day I noticed this man’s mail came from Minnesota. He told me his name was S. L. Edwin and his mail came addressed that way. That gave me a hunch. I just allowed, maybe he had changed his name from Edwin L. Sylvester to Sylvester L. Edwin. I wrote the Burns Detective Agency in Minnesota and asked them about this man Sylvester they were hunting.
"Before I got any reply, the man left my truck farm and went into the pine woods north of here to work. He didn’t stay very long. When he came back I got him a job as a fireman in the hotel. Then I got one of those circulars with Sylvester’s picture and description and I knew he was the banker. I told the sheriff and they arrested him," (NOTE: End of clipping.)

February 4, 1926 – Rochester Daily Bulletin
Sylvester Cries; Asks About Family
In Chicago Cell With Convicted Murderer Today
Still Bitter Against Many Who Played "Judas" for Reward
Poses for Photos in Chicago Today
Looks Seedy and Shabby – Glad to Return to Wabasha
Chicago, Ill. Feb. 4 – Lodged in a cell with a convicted murderer, E. L. Sylvester of Plainview today talked freely of his experiences in the South and expressed satisfaction that he is to return tomorrow to the scene of his life’s success and failure.
As he stepped off the train at noon, his first question was concerning his family. He was handcuffed to Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald and posed for photographs as he greeted the crowd at the Illinois Central depot.
He looked seedy and shabby, and had a two day growth of beard. He was friendly and apparently glad to get back to Wabasha county to get it over with.
He shook hands with the jailer at the county jail who assured him good treatment. He spoke in bitter terms of the man who played "Judas." Sylvester inquired as to the feeling of the people of Plainview.
Before reaching Chicago Sylvester broke down and cried several times. This is the first time since his arrest that tears have bathed his sorrow.
Sylvester felt like a "scared rabbit" when he hurriedly left Plainview last March with $443 in his pockets and he did not know where he was going when he got on the train that memorable night nearly a year ago, he told County Attorney John R. Foley as the train stopped at Memphis last night. His family knew his plans for the get-away and communicated with him through White Brothers. Inquiry did not reveal the identity of White Brothers, but it is presumed they are not in the Plainview territory (NOTE: Later found to be White Bear, Minnesota.)
Defalcation at the Plainview bank began more than twenty years ago, before the institution was organized as a state bank, he revealed for the first time today. He is beginning to discuss bank affairs.
Secret Memo Found
Mr. Foley has just found a secret memo in Sylvester’s personal effects. In addition to showing that he had $443 when he left Plainview, it reveals expenditures from February 28 to May 6. It shows the receipt of 12 letters and he sent eight. After notations of sending letters appear the initials "W. B." evidently White Brothers and he does not deny that the letters to members of his family were sent through White Brothers. The letters were received in two batches and the memorandum shows that he now has about ninety dollars.
Sylvester repeatedly shows his bitterness against George W. Hoffstetter, the farmer of Gulfport, Mississippi, who "betrayed him like Judas" for the $100 reward.

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Sylvester is due to arrive at Wabasha tomorrow evening in company with Mr. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Ed. Fitzgerald. The train is due at 7:30 PM. There will be little or no demonstration upon his arrival, it is believed.
Mixed Emotions at Plainview
As the time nears for his return to face court charges, Plainview is comparatively quiet as the intense excitement over the capture of "E. L." has subsided. Mixed emotions pervade Plainview on the eve of his return. Some of the bitterness of the first few months is lacking and many who will see Sylvester on his return and after, will go on a friendly mission, rather than out of curiosity. As the road from Plainview to Wabasha is snowblocked, travel is difficult.
When it became definitely known that Sylvester left Plainview with little money and that he lived the life of a near-beggar, sentiment has turned rather against Mrs. Sylvester as the one who is more responsible. It was suggested in Plainview today that steps be taken toward the arraignment of Mrs. Sylvester on a similar charge.
Some old friends feel that he has had punishment enough while others are intent that the full penalty of the law be invoked. Sylvester is 66 years old and a sentence will mean practically life imprisonment for the aged banker.

February 5, 1926 – Plainview News
Plainview Banker, Long Exiled, Finally Caught
Edwin L. Sylvester, Missing President, Is Located At Gulfport, Miss., Last Friday
Found Working as Fireman in Avon Hotel When Apprehended
Arrest Ends Continent-wide Search That Began in Spring
County Attorney and Deputy Sheriff Bring Prisoner Back Tonight
Edwin L. Sylvester, fugitive from justice for the past eleven months because of irregularities in his bank here, will arrive in Wabasha this evening in custody of County Attorney John R. Foley and Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald. He was arrested at Gulfport, Miss., late Friday on instructions of the county attorney when information from officials in that locality disclosed his where abouts. At the time of his arrest Sylvester was employed as fireman at the Avon Hotel at $1 per day and was eating his meals in the kitchen with the colored help.
With receipt of a telegram at midnight Friday stating briefly "Sylvester arrested. Admits Identity." Arrangements were begun at once to bring him back. Attorney Foley called upon the governor for extradition papers that there might be no delay and left at once for the south. Arriving there Tuesday forenoon he and the deputy went at once to the jail and prepared for his removal. There was a delay threatened when Sheriff Frank Duckworth who had arrested Sylvester asked for the reward. The difficulty was overcome and the officers began their return journey traveling only day times and lodging their prisoner in jail over night. They spent the firs night in New Orleans and arrived in Chicago yesterday afternoon. They were to start on the last lap of the trip this morning, arriving at Wabasha this evening.
Sylvester’s arrest was the result of carelessness in returning to Biloxi after he had left when warned that officers were on his trail. On Jan. 2, Gov. Christianson received a letter from G. W. Hoffstetter of Biloxi, Miss., asking information about Sylvester, which was at once turned over to County Attorney Foley. The writer stated that he thought he had seen Sylvester. What part this letter played in the arrest was not stated by Foley or any information regarding the nation-wide search except that circularizing the country and watching the family had ultimately brought results. Nothing was aid of the hundreds of reports which have been received detailing the progress of the search through detective agencies. Mr. Foley said that the county has spent $2,000 in their search.
According to the story told bitterly to newspaper men at New Orleans, Sylvester said his arrest was due to the betrayal of a man whom he thought a friend that he might

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obtain the $1,000 reward. Shortly after arriving in the south Sylvester obtained work on the truck farm of G. W. Hoffstetter who treated him kindly and whom he thought was a friend. Feeling assured of his friendship Sylvester told the story of his troubles. Hoffstetter then tried to sell him the farm and when the former banker refused, took advantage of his confidence, "Simply," Sylvester said, "because he wanted to make a paltry thousand dollars."
Leaving Plainview on February 28, 1925, on a stock train he went to Winona, stating that he was going to Minneapolis on business and would stay with his daughter. At Winona he took a train for Chicago where all trace of him was lost. At firs he said that he was too sick and weak to know just where he went. His movements were traced to Cleveland, O., Chattanooga, Tenn., Birmingham, Ala, arriving at Biloxi, Miss., March 4, the day the examiners arrived to examine his bank. On March 27 he went to work on the Hoffstetter truck farm, tending the gardens and peddling vegetables in the hot southern sun. In three months he left here and went to work in a saw mill for three weeks at Waynesboro. At the end of that period he took up farm work again at Lucedale for five months.
Tiring of the heavier farm work he went into the cotton fields for two months getting an average of one dollar a day. He gave that up when he could not keep up with the sweating Negroes with whom he worked. He then tried work in a cement block factory for a short time.
He then went back to the Hoffstetter farm and returned to the common labor of grubbing in the fields. It was at this time that Hoffstetter turned against him. Seeing his danger but not realizing its extent he left the farm and went to Biloxi. It was at this time that he took the job in the hotel boiler room which he held when arrested. Had he left that vicinity he would still be at large.
Sylvester at first was reluctant to discuss home affairs. When the Wabasha County officials arrived he greeted them cordially but talked mostly of his experiences in the south. He was particularly interested in his fishing excursions on the gulf and said that he could have made considerable money in Mississippi land. The failure of the bank was caused, he said, from deflated land values and he said that the shortage was only half what is reported.
The name he had been using was Samuel L. Edwin and his plan of avoiding discovery was to move from place to place. He communicated, he said, with members of his family and receiving a letter from them he would at once move on and his family did not know where he was until they heard from him again.
As described by the officers and newspaper men, Sylvester has led the life of a poor old man who has been driven penniless into the world. In his outdoor work he has regained some of his strength but he appears much thinner and older when he left Plainview. His clothes are shabby, he is tanned and his hands are callused. He still carries the little brown bag that assisted authorities in tracing him to Chicago and his working clothes are carried tied in a khaki cloth in the same manner as the Negroes tie theirs when moving from place to place.
As E. L. Sylvester near the end of his journey his courage is gradually weakening and is more free in telling his story. At Memphis Wednesday night he told Foley that he had left Plainview that memorable night like a scared rabbit with $433 in his pocket. His family knew of his plans for a get-away and communicated with him through White Brothers. Inquiry has failed to reveal who White Brothers are but it is not supposed that it is anyone in this vicinity. He said that he planned on going away for about three months and that his wife, daughter in St. Paul and son Edwin knew his plans. Embezzlements at the bank he said began more than twenty years ago before it became a state bank in 1906.
In Sylvester’s personal affects Mr. Foley has found a secret memo showing his

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expenditures from February 28 to May 6. It shows the receipt of twelve letters and that he sent eight. After the notations of sending letters are the initials "W. B."
He repeatedly shows his bitterness against George W. Hoffstetter who "betrayed him like Judas" for the $1,000 reward.
Arriving in Chicago yesterday he was lodged in jail with a convicted murderer. He has expressed himself as glad to be returning to Wabasha to face the music. When he stepped off the train at Chicago his first question was concerning his family. He was handcuffed to Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald and posed for photographs as he greeted the crows at Illinois Central Depot.
He looked seedy and shabby and had a two day growth of beard. He was friendly and glad to get back to Wabasha county and have it over with. "I got nothing out of it myself. It makes me sick just to think of those folks among whom I spent my life. It makes me even sicker to think of my wife and children and the shame they will feel. I tried to save the bank and the people who invested money in it," are phrases constantly repeated by Sylvester. He broke down and cried Wednesday afternoon and has broken down several times since, and it is expected that at any time he will give the whole story.
He likes to tell of his rise from a bookkeeper at $200 a year to the presidency of the bank. The land investments were made he said to try to recoup poor loan paper. Everybody was making money on land but the break came and land that cost me $200 per acre couldn’t be sold for $100.
G. W. Hoffstetter, the man who gave the information that brought about the arrest tells the following story:
"This man was working for me on my truck farm. He came along and asked. That gave me a hunch. I just allowed, seemed like other floaters and I was interested in him and watched him. Something about him always seemed queer.
One day I was reading a Minneapolis paper. I used to live up there and I have read the paper ever since. There was a story abut a banker Edwin L. Sylvester, who had disappeared from his home and who was wanted on charge of embezzling some of the bank’s money
The very next day I noticed this man’s mail came from Minnesota. He told me his name was S. L. Edwin and his mail came addressed that way. That gave me a hunch. I just allowed maybe he had changed his name from Edwin L. Sylvester to Sylvester L. Edwin. I wrote the Burns Detective Agency in Minnesota and asked them about this man Sylvester they were hunting. Before I got any reply, the man left my truck farm and went into the pine woods north of here to work. He didn’t stay very long. When he came back I got him a job in the hotel. Then I got one of those circulars with Sylvester’s picture and description and I knew it was the banker. I told the sheriff and they arrested him."

February 5, 1926- Rochester Post Bulletin – by Jack Crewe
I Can’t Live
Won’t Have Many More Birthdays or Hunt Deer, He Says
Planned to Move Family to South
"Guess Those Poor People Thought I was on the Square"
Chicago, Feb. 5 – E. L. Sylvester planned to secure a truck farm in Mississippi, move his family there and settle down "after things blew over."
He called the bank examiners "sticks" for not discovering the shortage before and related vividly the betrayal scene when "that Judas who was worth sixty or seventy thousand dollars, sold me out for a thousand."
He told of how he constantly evaded a Plainview woman who is spending the winter in the Mississippi town where Sylvester delivered milk and butter. He delivered

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to neighbors of the woman but escaped her notice, but he saw her several times at night through the window.
"I guess those poor old cusses around Plainview who lost their money thought I was square. I guess they didn’t think Ed Sylvester could do a thing like that."
This was Sylvester’s statement to me as he sat in the anti-room in the Cook county jail with Jailer conveniently near as he told the whole story of his adventures for the Post-Bulletin.
"You know," Sylvester said with a sob in his throat, "It doesn’t seem possible that I’m a crook. I used to think that I was a pretty good man at one time, and when I took the money I sort of felt I was taking it from the bank. It didn’t seem exactly like thievery. I never took a red cent of cold cash from anybody. I never took a man’s money over the counter and pocketed it as nothing would have been further from my mind."
Sylvester told of the shock he had when he learned of the death of his brother, George. He was in Biloxi then. George was never much in the bank, Sylvester said.
Not Many More Birthdays
The diary he kept had one pitifully interesting entry. Under the date of March 16 was entered "my birthday." It was his 66th birthday and doubtless it wasn’t a very happy one.
Concerning this entry Sylvester said, "Well I suppose I’ll go to Stillwater and I won’t have many more birthdays. I don’t suppose I’ll hunt deer anymore either."
Shabby and seedy looking and nervously chewing gum, Sylvester was at first reluctant to say anything, but he grew more loquacious as he got interested in the story and finally the whole tale came out with a rush of words.
"It all started twenty years ago. Even before we organized the bank as a state bank, there was a shortage and we never managed to catch up after that. I honestly thought at one time that I would make it up, but it kept getting worse and worse and when the crash came I had all those land deals on hand and everything went bump."
Has No Money
"Some people think I’ve got money. I haven’t got a cent." I had about four hundred dollars when I left Plainview and I had that used up pretty soon after I got to Biloxi. In jail here and other jails I’ve been in since I got caught the other prisoners and I talk together and they say to me: "Well what you in for? What did you do?" I tell them I’m charged with embezzling a hundred thousand dollars and they say "have you got the money?" and I say No, and they say, "Well, you’re a crazy fool, if I’d stole that much I’d have planted some of it somewhere."
"Why I was so hard up down south that I went back to Hoffstetter – the man who gave me away – just to get thirty dollars I had coming from him for work I did. If I hadn’t gone back there for that thirty dollars I might not have been caught."
Sylvester admits his wife knew conditions before he left Plainview and knew that he was running away. He had no difficulty in corresponding with his family but was reluctant to disclose how it was done. After he quit working on Hoffstetter’s farm and went to work in the hotel, Mrs. Hoffstetter used to bring him mail at the hotel.
Saw Plainview Woman
When he stared out from Plainview last February he didn’t know where he was bound, Sylvester’s only though was to get away. He went to Cincinnati and then down south. It wasn’t until he was in the south that he thought of Biloxi and he happened to think of that because he had heard a Mrs. John Burnham of Plainview tell about the place. She spends her winters there.
"Mrs. Burnham was down there this winter," Sylvester said, "and I found out her address at Biloxi and when I delivered milk and butter I made sure to keep away from where she was staying. But I saw her, even if she didn’t see me. I used to see her sometimes at night through the window."

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Sylvester didn’t think there was anything shrewd about the way he concealed shortages. In fact he says, he was surprised they weren’t discovered.
"Why when those examiners came around I was sick," he said. "I always thought they would discover what was wrong. They were sticks not to see it."
Worked Like Slave
On the Hoffstetter farm Sylvester says he worked like a slave. He got up at 4 AM, milked cows and gathered up manure and fertilizer, then had breakfast and drove to town in a Ford truck with milk, butter and eggs.
Hoffstatter treated him well, he said, until Mr. Hoffstatter gave him away. "That Judas," Sylvester muttered, "Worth sixty or seventy thousand dollars and then sold me out for a thousand. I surely never suspected anything like that. I was working in the hotel and Hoffsteter and his son-in-law came up and talked to me and I showed them the boiler room. We laughed and chatted and all the time they were looking at me and comparing me with one of those circulars they had in their pocket and I didn’t know it."
Intended to Settle Down
Sylvester’s plan, he said, had been to hide around in the south "until things sort of blew over" and then have his family come down to him, settle down on a small truck farm and stay there. He never thought of leaving the country, he said, because his wife didn’t want him to.
Sylvester’s meal in jail last night consisted of a hunk of bread, wieners, sauerkraut and coffee eaten off a tin plate with a big spoon. No knives or forks allowed. He was locked in the receiving room of Cook county jail with a score of other prisoners including several murderers. In this harsh company he looked pitifully small and harmless as he paced up and down. He was wearing the same suit he wore when he left Plainview and it was almost in rags. His baggage was a big brown bundle containing his clothes… well as he related in detail the whole story of his adventure…
Every item including meals was kept in a diary. On March 24 he wrote another letter "to W. Bear." This is taken as an indication that he addressed mail to White Bear, Minnesota.
Sylvester appeared bewildered by the crowds and photographers. He jumped when a photographer snapped his picture as he stepped off the train. After that he posed and a large crowd gathered around in the Chicago railway station. People queried "Who is he?"
At the police station he posed willingly enough for photographers from Chicago newspapers. Three of them trained their cameras on him. One asked him several times to smile into the lens. "Well," he said testily, "I can smile but I can’t keep it up very long."
Sylvester said he hadn’t decided what plea he would make. "I want to wait until I see my family," he said, "and sort of find out what the sentiment is."
Three or four times during his long interview with me, Sylvester showed signs of breaking down, but he maintained his composure remarkably well as he related in detail the whole story of his adventure.
Not for Myself He tells Foley
Enroute to Chicago yesterday Sylvester and County Attorney John R. Foley talked for hours.
"I didn’t do it for myself," Sylvester would repeat over and over again when Foley’s leading question got too strong for the old man. "I did it to save the bank," Sylvester would say. "I failed. Bad loans had ruined the bank. I saw the bank tottering. I saw my life wrecking to pieces."
Sylvester would then lean back in his seat. He is only a derelict now. His shoes are broken. His shirt has no collar and his clothing is hanging in baggy shape on his skinny figure.
"I couldn’t face the people the way they would look at me in Plainview," he would

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continue, "when they learned their savings were lost, so I took all the resources of the bank I could reach and invested them in improved farm lands at the time thee was a boom up there. I thought the land would increase in value. I paid $200 per acre for some of the farms. You know the bottom fell out, John. Those farms dropped to $100 an acre. I couldn’t face my friends so I ran away."
Loyal to Family
His loyalty to his family is remarkable. Not one speck of blame has the old man placed on their heads. He has not mentioned their expensive living as disclosed in Winona by Senator James A. Carley, from bank records after the first bankruptcy hearing. He almost refused to talk about his own bank account.
"It was on February 28, 1925, when I first knew that the bank was doomed. I started for Florida but on the train I thought of the many northern people there and changed my route to Biloxi."
Must Face it All
Sylvester has not yet been told that banking experts traced his shortage back twenty-two years, and are very well acquainted with the methods he employed. He doesn’t know that Senator Carley has evidence to prove that he had planned to leave Plainview three months earlier than he really did.
He likes to tell newspaper men of his rise from a bookkeeper working for $200 a year to the presidency of a bank, of his standing in the community, his church membership, and his Sunday school classes.
"Now of course, I’ve got to go back and face it all," Sylvester concludes. "It makes me sick just to think of those folks among whom I spent my life. It makes me even sicker to think of my wife and children and the same they will feel."
"I didn’t do it for myself," he would repeat. "I tried to save the bank and save the people who had invested money in it and the depositors who had put their money in it. I got nothing out of it myself. It’s just a horrible nightmare from the time things began to go wrong. But as far as any dishonesty out of which I was to profit myself, I am innocent."

February 5, 1926- Winona Republican Herald
Will Stand By Husband
Expect Large Crowd at Depot When He Arrives
Four Indictments Await Fugitive Bank President
Arraignment Tomorrow
Sylvester More Nervous as Train Approaches Winona
Planned to Settle With Family in South, He Tells Reporters
Mrs. Sylvester Has Been Under Care of Nurse
Friends in Plainview Sympathetic
Wabasha, Minn. Feb. 5 – Mrs. Hetty Sylvester will be on the depot platform tonight to greet her husband with open arms. Sylvester will arrive here this evening on Milwaukee train No. 17 at 7:00 PM according to word received from County attorney John R. Foley. Mrs. Sylvester came here from Minneapolis this afternoon. She still maintains strong support of her husband.
Not a word betraying her husband has escaped her lips. Even last night in Minneapolis, after the old gray man from Plainview broke down and confessed his wrong doings, and a newspaper man approached her and told her the facts, she still had a stiff upper lip and stated, "I have nothing to say."
Has Friends in Community
Sylvester still has friends in this community. A large crowd will be at the depot to meet him tonight and to cheer him up.
Many automobile parties will plow through the snow from Plainview to be at the station when the train pulls in. He has the sympathy of the community, and the confidence of a good many of the Plainview People. They believe that "Ed" is honest at heart, and did the best he could with a hopeless situation.

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Sylvester will doubtless be arraigned here tomorrow morning in district court, and will be brought before Judge Karl Finkelnburg Monday when a special term of the Wabasha district court will open.
To Face Four Indictments
There are four individual indictments against him returned by the grand jury last May. These indictments charge him with grand larceny, receiving money in an insolvent bank, making false entries, and jointly charging him again with all those offenses with the other officers of the bank.
Minneapolis, Minn. Feb. 5 – Mrs. Hetty Sylvester, leader in Women’s club work and once a member of the Minnesota Republican State Central Committee, today is on her way to Wabasha to stand by her erring husband, E. L. Sylvester, president of the Plainview State Bank.
Mr. Sylvester fled a year ago when he no longer felt equal to the task of manipulating the tangled affairs of the Plainview banking house, which manipulations had been under way for 18 years and he feared the trap which he set for himself through studied peculations would be sprung.
Back to Face Accusers
Today, in the custody of Wabasha county authorities, he was to be brought back a prisoner, to face his accusers. A broken man, his eyes swollen and his hands trembling, according to word which preceded him to Wabasha, the 65 year old banker, once the outstanding citizen, was to receive a cheery greeting from his wife.
The word Plainview means something more to Sylvester today. Disgraced, his family humbled, Plainview’s fugitive whose unlawful transactions through the years caused many an honest man’s savings to flit away and evaporate through another spending, returned to plain view of those he had defrauded.
I’m going to stand by my husband," Mrs. Sylvester said at her apartment home at 3142 Lyndale Avenue in Minneapolis last night. Mrs. Sylvester, worn by the ordeal, which has been intensified since the capture and arrest of her husband at Gulfport, Miss., insisted she had nothing to say for publication.
Under Care of Nurse
"I have been under the care of a nurse and I do not wish to talk about this affair," she said. Mrs. Sylvester was told that, according to private press messages to the Winona Republican Herald, her husband had said that he had exchanged letters with his family, that they knew at the time of his hasty departure that he was fleeing justice and that the condition of the bank was known in Sylvester’s domestic circles when he left.
"I never knew anything about the condition of the bank," Mrs. Sylvester answered, still insisting that she had no word to give out for publication. "I never have received any information from my husband since he left and I had no idea when he left that he wasn’t coming back. I shall go to Wabasha tomorrow to meet my husband and stand by him."
On Board Train With Sylvester Party En route to Wabasha, Friday Noon
Edwin Sylvester and his party are on the last leg of their trip back to Minnesota. Hour by hour the final climax of the trip is growing nearer, and hour by hour the gray man from Plainview is getting more nervous. He can hardly sit still now and every once in awhile cries a few tears.
He has told most of his story to County Attorney John R. Foley, and the discussion now has narrowed down to details about specific matters. His memory is quite clear on all those details, and he recalls events of the bank’s business which few men could do without the records.
Much of the information he is giving now has already come out in the Arthur S. Kennedy and Adolph Stoltz trials at Wabasha, and is no longer news to the people back

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home.
Yesterday when the party arrived in Chicago it was stormed at the depot by press photographers and reporters. Sylvester went through the ordeal without weakening. However, the interviews he have newspaper men who met him here had few new details that had not been disclosed on the long trip from the South.
Planned to Settle in South
"I had planned to settle in the south," he told the reporters, "if I had not been arrested and later have my family come to me."
Sylvester is still very bitter against Hoffstetter whom he believes betrayed him and caused his arrest. He declares him to be Judas.
The officers yesterday going through his belongings found several letters. County Attorney Foley however, refused to make their contents public. In the press interview at the Cook county jail where he was lodged for safe keeping last night, he talked about the Gulfport and Biloxi boom and about fishing on the gulf. He preferred not to go into details with the newspaper men about the affairs of the bank.
Jovial at Times
He was jovial at times yesterday as the train neared Chicago, but when Deputy Sheriff Ed Fitzgerald got handcuffs out, he objected to wearing them, but submitted without difficulty and his mood became much more sober.
He and Foley talked to past midnight Wednesday evening about the affairs of the bank, and the discussion was renewed again today as the train rolled on toward Minnesota.
In yesterday’s dispatch reference to White Brother’s was incorrect. It was apparently a mistake in telegraph transmission. His source of communication with his family was through White Bear, Minn.

February 5, 1926- Winona Republican-Herald
Plainview Friends May Furnish Bond for E. L. Sylvester
Rumor of Move to Raise Funds General There
Many to go to Wabasha to See Him When He Arrives
Plainview, Minn., Feb. 5 – Plainview still has an overwhelming confidence in Sylvester. If he needs men to go his bonds for bail when he is arraigned in Wabasha Monday he will find them in Plainview. In fact rumors of a movement to raise the money for his bail are already quite common about the streets of this village.
Sympathy talk about their "own E. L." who did so much for Plainview in the past, who helped to build up the town, and who has been their fellow citizen for nearly fifty years is heard on every corner.
The town will be out in force tonight when he arrives in Wabasha. Many more will make special trips over there tomorrow to "see E. L."
"The fact that he didn’t get any money himself," Senator James A. Carley said today, "has developed a strong favorable opinion towards Sylvester. The feeling here however is quite bitter against his wife and family."
A telephone survey of Plainview people made today by the Republican-Herald reveals the following as the opinion there.
"Plainview is sorry for E. L." one of the leading citizens expressed, "but they feel that he has done wrong and should be punished. The people are glad he has been arrested but they hope the punishment meted out to him will be light. They believe he has been punished quite a bit during the past year.

February 5, 1926- Rochester Daily Bulletin
Sylvester Reenacts Tragic Scene Before Bank Closed
Ed, George and Art Kennedy All "Wonder How Long Will Have to Serve in Jail"

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Expects to Die in Prison or Before
By Jack Creoe Enroute With Sylvester, Milwaukee, Feb. 5 – A tragic scene that took place in the Plainview State Bank several months before it closed was reenacted on the train this morning with Sylvester playing the major role and doubling for his dead brother and Arthur Kennedy, both associated with him in the bank.
The scene was in the bank at night. Time – several months before it closed.
Sylvester, with his brother George, now deceased, and Art Kennedy were sitting in the bank "wondering what we could do." Kennedy has been looking up the law on it and he found out how long I would have to go to jail; how long he would have to serve and how long George would if it were found out."
"We all broke down and cried, the three of us, and had a regular crying spell. Art said he didn’t care about himself, but it was his family. I felt the same way about it."
Sylvester Crumbling
As the train speeds across Wisconsin today, back to the country from which he fled 11 months ago and as the miles are reeling off, Sylvester’s composure is slowly crumbling, although early in the day he displayed a fighting spirit. He and County Attorney Foley continue to discuss the bank’s affairs and Sylvester told of incidents hitherto unknown, including the bank "scene."
During a fighting mood today the former banker said he wouldn’t decide for a while what he would do about pleading. He said a lawyer cousin of his, Elmer C. Yetter, who formerly practiced law with the late C. C. Willson of Rochester, was coming to Wabasha Saturday to talk things over.
Sylvester is particularly interested in the matter of bail and prison affairs. Once he grew sarcastic. "I suppose," he said, "I could use that hundred thousand dollars they said I took South with me for bail."
"What If I Make Good?"
Later he said: "What if I should make good some of this? Don’t they let bankers off a little easier if they do?" Told that he would have to stay in jail for a time at Wabasha he said, "Well, my enemies can come in and stare at me. My friends can see me too if I have any left." He admitted again today that he had confessed to his family what he had done some time before he left Plainview.

May Die Before Sentence
Tears stood in his eyes as he discussed prison life.
"Well," he said "It’s done and I am in the coup and if I go to prison I’ll probably die there it I don’t die before I get there." Sylvester, as he sat twisting his gnarled fingers and blinked away the tears was a pitiful figure.

February 6, 1926- Rochester Daily Bulletin
Banker Embraces Wife and Daughter
"Don’t Cry," He Implores, "I’m Dumb"
Sylvester Will Rest Before Plea
Little Chance of Bail, Attorney Thinks
By Jack Crewe
Wabasha, Minn., Feb. 6 – Ed Sylvester and the "Missus" – the little gray haired woman who has stood by him since he fled from Plainview last February – were reunited in the county jail here this morning.
Mrs. Sylvester and her daughter, Nettie Caldwell, of St. Paul, arrived here at 10:45 AM from Minneapolis and went immediately to the jail. They brought Ed down from his lonely cell upstairs and he waited to the reception room.
"Well, Well, _____" he said when he saw his wife and daughter. "Well, I’m home. I’m back again." He embraced both women. Mrs. Sylvester broke down and cried silently. Nettie clung to her father sobbing.
"There now. There now," he said soothingly. "Don’t cry. Don’t take on so. I’m


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dumb."
"Oh, Daddy! sobbed Nettie.
Wife Near Collapse
Mrs. Sylvester, near collapse, sat down and Ed asked Nettie to sit down.
"No," she said, "you sit here Daddy. You’re tired." Then she burst into sobbing and Ed took her into his arms.
"Brace up," he said, "Brace up. It’s all right now."
"Maybe the Missus would like to see my work clothes I brought home," said Ed, turning to his wife. "Shall I get ‘em?"
"No, Ed," said Mrs. Sylvester, "just sit here a few minutes, let’s don’t move now."
Mrs. Sylvester and Nettie were not met at the train when they arrived from Minneapolis. They stood looking for a car until the Post-Bulletin reporter invited them to share his cab. Mrs. Sylvester chatted amiably on the ride up to the jail, but Nettie was suspicious. The reporter carried Mrs. Sylvester’s bag into the jail, and helped her over the icy sidewalk.
Sylvester Will Rest
Ed Sylvester will be permitted to rest for a few days before he decides what course he will follow, County Attorney Foley announced this morning. He will probably not be arraigned for several days. A special term of district court scheduled to open here Monday, has been postponed indefinitely by Judge Finkelnberg at the request of Mr. Foley.
This morning C. L. Mikkelson deputy examiner in charge of the bank’s affairs, was locked in the cell with Sylvester, while Ed began going over with him the tangled affairs of the bank, promising to explain everything. He worked with Mikkelson until his family arrived and was expected to continue this afternoon.
Little Possibility of Bail
Mr. Foley announced that the crimes on which Sylvester are indicted are bailable, but he did not believe bail would be sought because it will be so high.
Sylvester spent a restful night in the cell and said he enjoyed a good soft bed again.
Ed promised Mr. Mikkelson that he would deed his Canadian land holdings over to the bank. This land, not affected in bankruptcy proceedings, includes about 160 acres in Alberta, worth approximately $1,600.
Edwin Sylvester, E. L.’s son, could not get away from his job to come down with his mother and sister this morning, but is expected to arrive this afternoon.
Couldn’t Say No If Man Needed Money
"Family Spent Too Much, But That Was My Fault, Too"
Bail Unlikely Attorney Thinks
Dictates Statement To People of Plainview Thru Post Bulletin
By Jack Crewe
Wabasha, Minn., Feb. 6 – "I was too easy; I could not say no to my friends who needed money. I guess I was a better thief than banker. My family spent too much money, but that was my fault, too."
Thus Ed. L. Sylvester attributed the cause of his downfall upon his return to Wabasha. Cars were lined up for a block or two and it was a curious crowd that watched the "gray man of Plainview" make his way to a waiting automobile.
Rumors stated that his wife would meet him at the station last night, but she did not arrive here until late this morning. She went to the jail immediately. In the jail today, Sylvester had his first home cooked Minnesota meal in 11 months. It was prepared by Anna Fitzgerald, woman sheriff of Wabasha county, and served in the kitchen of the jail. County Attorney Foley sat across the table from Sylvester, and the two chatted amiably.
Dictated Statement

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Sylvester’s statement was dictated by him to the Post-Bulletin correspondent. He spoke clearly without faltering and seemed relieved to think that his words were going directly to the people of Plainview. There was a sincere ring in his voice as he told of his earnest desire to do right.
(NOTE: Inserted here is Sylvester’s Statement)
Dictated on the Milwaukee train an hour before it reached Wabasha. "You can tell the people this; I am aware that I have done wrong. I am willing to do everything in my power to make amends for the sake of my family and my friends of a lifetime and for society in general. My doings should be a lesson to other bankers. I hope my health will be spared so that I may be able to show that while I am down now, I am not out. I have learned my lesson and will positively do the right thing hereafter. I am sorry for what I have done. And if I had it to do over again I would not run away. I would try and face the music. The boys (the deputy sheriff and county attorney) have given me a pleasant trip from Biloxi and have showed me all the courtesies possible in their position. I am glad this thing has got this far along. I haven’t got any money. I took none with me. The way I feel now I don’t expect to stand trial. I certainly don’t expect to put up a terrible fight. I guess that’s all." (NOTE: End of Statement.)
As Sylvester is lodged in jail, expressions of pity are heard all about him. He is such a sorrowful figure so pathetic in his worn out clothes that his appearance causes lumps to rise in many throats.
A broken-hearted, broken-spirited, forlorn-looking gray little man, garbed in tattered clothing, rough work shoes and a sweat-stained brown hat, carrying a big brown khaki-wrapped bundle, stepped off the train at Wabasha at 7:15 last night.
Beside the man was a big deputy sheriff. Behind him was the county attorney. The deputy sheriff shouldered a lane through a gaping, staring crowd of more than a hundred people, and the two men and their prisoner made their way swiftly and silently to a waiting automobile.
The automobile sped away, throwing a dozen following cars off the trail, and drew up beside the county jail. Three men walked hurriedly up the sidewalk and into the jail building.
The big iron door of a solitary cell on the second floor of the building clanged behind the little gray man.
Ed. Sylvester Was Back Home
Ed Sylvester – the man who once was the pride of Plainview, the citizen to whom the community pointed with pride and honored with the fullest faith and trust – was in the county jail after being a fugitive from justice for ten months.
This man who once wore the best clothes and lived in the best house in the village of Plainview sat behind the bars where he was left alone to decide whether he should plead guilty to one or several of the half dozen indictments against him – indictments ranging from accepting deposits in a defunct bank to embezzling $100,000.
Guilty Plea, Belief
He has indicated that, as far as he knows now, he will plead guilty. He is ready, he says "to face the music."
Sylvester was brought from Chicago yesterday in the last lap of the long journey from Biloxi, where he was captured and turned over to the Wabasha county authorities.
The Wabasha county jail was the fourth one he has slept in. He spent several days in the jail at Biloxi. He spent a night in the Parish prison at New Orleans. And he

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spent Thursday night in the noisy, dirty famous Cook county jail in Chicago.
In Chicago Sylvester faced a dozen cameras. He posed for his picture which was printed in all the Chicago newspapers. Then he went to the county jail, where they took his clothes away from him, gave him a hurried and not too gentle physical examination, made him take a bath, and returned his clothes and shoved him in a big bared room with a score of other wrong-doers.
"How’d you like to be put in with Martin Durkin?" a big husky uniformed guard asked Sylvester playfully. [HOWDER’S NOTE: In 1925 Martin Durkin was responsible for killing an FBI agent, the first to die in the line of duty. He was captured and returned to Chicago in 1926]
"Who is Durkin?"
"I don’t know," said Sylvester trembling. He wasn’t used to this sort of joking. After all, he was a country banker, and he didn’t know much about jails and crime and criminals. "I don’t know," he repeated. "Who is he?"
The jailer roared and several others standing around tittered. In the big cell room Sylvester bumped up against hardened criminals, low-browed swarthy men who had committed every variety of crime. A dope fiend reeled drunkenly against him. An unassuming young man sidled up and talked to him.
"What you in for?" said Sylvester in a friendly tone an old man uses towards a young boy.
"I dunno," the boy responded. "They said they pinched me for being Martin Durkin’s roommate."
A harsh-looking individual addressed the mild-mannered little Plainview man.
"Ever been in the pen before?" he said.
Full of Lice
"Nope" said Mr. Sylvester, "I don’t know much about this."
"Well, I been here lots of times," the hard-boiled individual said. "If you’re here very long you’ll be full o’ lice. This joint is lousy as hell." Mr. Sylvester shuddered.
At seven o’clock yesterday morning Deputy Sheriff Fitzgerald and County Attorney John R. Foley got their prisoner and brought him to the hotel for his breakfast. They ate their meal in the grillroom and Mr. Sylvester looked as out of place there as he did in the county jail, his worn clothing, his stubbly beard, his tieless collar gave him an air of incongruity. But he ate a hearty breakfast and stuffed half a dozen lumps of sugar in his pocket as he left the table.
The officers and their man hurried to the Chicago Union Station. Ed. Sylvester stood with the county attorney while the deputy sheriff bought the tickets.
Sylvester in Pictures
Passersby looked up from their morning newspapers, recognizing him as the same man whose picture appeared in their papers. He paid no attention to them, but peered at the great concourse through his glasses. "Mighty pretty building, isn’t it?" he said.
They boarded the train and it began to move slowly out of the station. Ed Sylvester was on his way home.
County Attorney Foley began to discuss with Ed, as he had all during the trip up from the South, the affairs of the bank. But Ed wasn’t very willing too talk.
It had been that way every day. The mornings seemed to give him courage. Every evening his sprits dropped and he talked freely in a voice broken by sobs.
But there was another factor yesterday. Every moment was brining him closer to home. Every station was one step nearer to the country from which he fled a year ago.
Sylvester Talks
Early in the afternoon Ed began to talk. And once he began he rattled on and on, telling everything. Frequently he broke down. Several times he almost collapsed, and he wept convulsively. But he always recovered his composure, and too off his glasses

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and wiped them carefully and wiped the tears from his eyes. Then he popped one of the lumps of sugar into his mouth and went on talking, his speech becoming clearer as the sugar dissolved.
Dramatic Moments
There were moments during yesterday afternoon so intensely dramatic and so pathetic and heart-rending that the men who were spectators had difficulty themselves in keeping the tears from their eyes.
Fifteen or 20 miles out of Chicago, Ed Sylvester saw the first real snow he had seen since he fled from Plainview last year.
"Look at that snow," he said excitedly, peering out of the car window. "Say, I’d just like to get out there and run around and play in it – gosh!"
And when the Mississippi River was crossed, not many miles from home, he almost broke down and wept.
"Gosh!" he said, "there’s the old Mississippi! Say, I’d like to go and pull a pike out from a hole in the ice." Across the state line he sniffed the air.
Glad to be Home
"Smell the air," he said. "That’s Minnesota air. It smells different. It smells clean. My God, Boys!" and a sob choked his voice. "You don’t know what it means to get home again. You don’t know how homesick, I was. You don’t know what it meant to be way down there away from everybody – whishing I could see a face I knew, and wishing I could talk to somebody I could trust. It was terrible."
Sylvester’s story – the details he had not before disclosed – came fragmentarily, frequently interrupted by crying spells.
The whole trouble started, he said, some 25 years ago, before the Plainview State Bank was in existence. It was Sylvester Brother’s bank, then, and there was a shortage. When the new bank was organized the business of the two institutions was kept separate for a time. Eventually the assets of the Sylvester Brother’s bank were transferred to the Plainview State Bank, to make it appear that the later institution was growing rapidly.
"That’s the way Art Kennedy got into the bank, you know," said Sylvester. "He saw we were doing well, and he wrote saying he’d like to get into the business. He came down and we sold him a share in the bank. It was a share formerly owned by a man named Uecker, from whom I had bought his stock.
"Well," he continued, "pretty soon after Art got into the bank he discovered the shortage. But he didn’t say anything about it! He could have got out then if he’d wanted to."
Kennedy Aided Him
"I won’t say anything about Art. I suppose I’m guiltier than he is, but let me tell you, I couldn’t have done what I did without Art there. He made it possible for me to do those things.
"Art and I were in the whole cheese in the bank. We were the bank. George F., my brother, and Stoltz, didn’t amount to a row of pins. George was incompetent and Stoltz was there to get his $200 a month.
Stoltz and George never got along very well together, either. I remember one time they had a fight, right in the back room of the bank and I guess George got scratched up a little."
Sylvester didn’t realize what he was doing, and what position he was getting into until a year or so before the bank closed.
"Why boys," he said, bursting into tears again, "I can’t hardly realize what I’ve done. My God, I didn’t think I was stealing. I’m sorry, sorry, sorry! I’m sorry for those people that trusted me. They put too much confidence in me, I guess. That was the trouble. They didn’t think I could do any wrong. Why, I didn’t either. It went too easy.

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I just didn’t realize.
Bull By Tail, But He Ran
"But then things kept getting worse and worse. Then I got into those land deals and things went bump there, and then I was back. Why, we just sort of got the bull by the tail and the bull stared to run and we couldn’t let go. That’s the way it was."
Three things made Ed Sylvester realize the end was near last January.
"In the first place," he said, "the examiners were getting awful hot on our trail and we were getting pretty scared. In the second place it came time fro me to give a bond for the county deposits, and I couldn’t do it. The boys wanted me to get a surety bond, but I didn’t have anything to back up that kind of a bond. Then one of the big citizens of Plainview who had been bondsman for me many times before was reluctant to go on a personal bond. He said he had heard from somebody else that the bank was pretty bad off. I knew then that the crash was coming.
Told Family on Christmas
On Christmas – a year ago this last Christmas – the Sylvester family spent one of the saddest holidays in its history.
It was just about Christmas time, Ed said, that he confessed to his family that he was short in the bank.
"There was Nettie and Edwin and the Mrs. and me there," he said. "I told ‘em but I didn’t have the heart to tell them how big the shortage was, altho I knew it was pretty big. They took it hard, and there didn’t any of us sleep a wink for several nights.
"Then Mrs. Sylvester went to Rochester to try and borrow some money – of course she didn’t tell what for. They told her there she could have the money if there was plenty of security to back it up. But of course, we didn’t have the security.
"Well, February came and I made up my mind to go away. I talked it over with the family about two days before I left from Plainview.
Decided to Leave – Nearly Crazy
"My God, I didn’t sleep a wink for one-two nights. I was near crazy." And here Sylvester burst into violent sobs which he had difficulty in controlling.
"At Winona," he continued, "I got on the Chicago train, but I had kind of a hard time getting to sleep. I did sleep a little though, because I was just about exhausted.
"I got to thinking then, for the first time, what name I ought to take. I thought of John Smith and John Jones and all those names, and they didn’t seem right. Then I thought of turning my initials backward, and that’s the way I picked the name I used – Samuel L. Edwin."
When he arrived in the South, Sylvester wrote a letter home and gave his address and the name he had assumed. After that correspondence went on fairly regularly. His wife was the only person who wrote, he said.
Discussing the condition of the bank, Sylvester said that one thing that made it harder was the number of bank notes the bank had.
Too Easy – Better Thief Than Banker
"You know," he said, "I was too easy. I couldn’t say ‘no’ to my friends. That was the trouble with me, I guess. I wasn’t a banker. I guess I was a better thief than a banker.
"And it was the same way with my family. I was too liberal there too. I didn’t have the heart to refuse them anything. I couldn’t say no there, either.
While Sylvester was divulging all these details the train was pounding its way steadily towards Minnesota. And as mile after mile was reeled off his composure ebbed, and he burst into tears more frequently. But he was getting the whole terrible story off his chest, and he was glad, he said.
Never Thought of Suicide
"You know," he said, "when I went away from Plainview my family was afraid I

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was going to do away with myself. But I told them I wouldn’t do that, and I never really thought of doing it."
Down in Biloxi Sylvester knew on several occasions what it was to be broke. Once he had to borrow a dollar from a woman to tide him over Sunday. Some of those days down South were hideous nightmares, Sylvester said.
"I thought I would go crazy, sometimes," he sobbed. "I’d lie awake there nights and dream about it. God, I don’t know but what maybe I’ll go crazy anyway."
Work is Godsend
"But it was awful down there. When I was working I was alright. Boys, let me tell you, work is a Godsend. I always knew that, but I never knew how much it meant. Why, when I was out of a job, I’d go fishing to try and keep my mind off things, but even then I’d think of them and I’d nearly go crazy.
I couldn’t go to church. I went two or three times, but I was afraid people would get interested and get too personal.
"Up at Lucedale, where I worked in the lumber mill, I was out of a job for a while. I went to the court house then every day for a couple of weeks and attended court. It was mostly bootlegger trials, but I used to sit there all day just to pass the time away.
"In the courthouse there I saw pictures of Dutch Anderson and some Minneapolis man for whom rewards were offered. I wondered if my picture was there, too and I looked around for it but couldn’t find it. I went back there several times to see if it had posted, but I never saw it. I had heard then, you know, that those posters had been sent over all the country.
Considered Coming Home
"You know, I did consider coming home once. I thought of coming home last November when the trials were on, but I couldn’t do it. I just couldn’t face the music, boys, I couldn’t face the music. Why, when I thought of all those people there that I had known since childhood, it nearly killed me.
"I didn’t know what to do. I knew they couldn’t hang me. But I did think that some of those old folks I stole from must be mad enough to shoot me. I wasn’t afraid of that, though. I just couldn’t face them, that’s all.
Would Face Music
"I tell you, if I had it to do over again, I’d stand up and face the music rather than go through all that terrible experience again."
The two loneliest days Sylvester spent in the South were Fourth of July and Christmas. On the Fourth of July he worked in the field all day under the burning sun, with the temperature over 100. He was cultivating cotton, and as he worked he thought of the folks back home and of the celebrations he used to have.
Five Dollar Christmas Present
On Christmas day he was alone – without a friend in whom he could confide. And he recalled the happy family gatherings they used to have in Plainview on that holiday. He got a five dollar bill from home for his Christmas present and it was as wonderful a present as he had ever received, he said.
Sylvester’s actions as the train swept through the bluff country which he had not seen in 10 months were pitiful. He stared out his window, fairly devouring the landscape with his eyes.
"Boys, the old north country looks pretty good to me," he said. "Gosh," he went on, "I want to go back now and do all I can for all the people who lost money on account of me. I want to see my friends again."

February 11, 1926-
Deputy Sheriff Lost in Crowd
Clings to Foley
Station Platform and Court Room Jammed With Eager Spectators

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Sylvester Train Late
Plea Delayed
Mrs. Sylvester Crushed in Crowd – Camera Tipped Over
Bewildered at seeing a crowd of several hundred persons when his train drew into the Great Western Railroad Station shortly before 2 PM today, E. L. Sylvester clung to the arm of John R. Foley, Wabasha County Attorney, and was rushed to a waiting automobile to be taken before Judge Charles E. Callaghan to plead guilty to one count of an indictment returned by a grand jury in connection with the wreck of the Plainview State Bank.
Loses Sheriff
In the mob which filled every inch of available space in the station, the deputy sheriff in charge of Sylvester was separated from his prisoner. He did not reach the automobile where the banker was seated until after the county attorney had piloted Sylvester through the crowd. As if fearful of being lost in the crowd, the former Plainview banker gripped the arm of Mr. Foley and followed the county attorney. He was not handcuffed.
Mrs. Sylvester, who with her husband, the county attorney, and the deputy sheriff, comprised the party, was also separated from her husband.
"They almost killed me," she said, when she finally succeeded in battling her way through the throng to the machine where the balance of the party was already seated. The words spoken by Mrs. Sylvester were the only ones spoken by any member of the party.
Sylvester Follows
The county attorney’s tall form was the first to appear on the steps of the car. He answered the beck of a friend with a nod. Close lipped, he did not speak, but plunged his way through the crowd, Sylvester following.
The half dozen police officers at the station were powerless to make a lane for the curious spectators. A camera tripod was upset when the railroad car passed down the platform farther than the photographer calculated. The sheriff here was not present and it appeared that no arrangements had been made to convey the prisoner to the courthouse. The machine used was a private automobile.
"That’s Him"
"That’s him, the little fellow" someone said when the small, bespectacled Sylvester appeared on the steps of the car after the county attorney. The crowd made a rush.
In the melee that followed, Mrs. Sylvester, the last to alight, was jostled and pushed and nearly trampled upon while the deputy sheriff made ineffectual attempts to follow his prisoner, arriving at the automobile after he and the county attorney were seated.
Wife Fight Way
A moment later, when Mr. Foley noted the absence of Mrs. Sylvester and a search was about to be started, the little gray haired woman fought her way through the crowd and slipped into the car.
Few in the large crowd got a glimpse of Sylvester although they all made efforts to do so. Boxcars standing on a sidetrack near the station served as bleachers for those who eschewed the jostling throng on the platform. Two minutes after Sylvester was ushered from the car, he was being rushed to the courthouse.
Several minutes before 1:35 PM when the train was due to arrive, the crowd began to gather. The car actually did not arrive until 1:50 PM. Many were of the opinion that arrangements had been made to stop the car at some of the city crossings and some held that it would stop at the Eleventh Avenue NW crossing, there to be met by the sheriff and Sylvester hurried to the courthouse.
Courthouse Crowded

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At 11:30 PM an hour and a half before Sylvester was scheduled to appear before Judge Callaghan, the little courthouse was jammed with spectators and every available seat was taken. The front steps and corridors were packed with those unable to obtain a set in the courtroom and they waited for the appearance of the former Plainview bank president, whose disappearance and recent capture in a small town in Mississippi has raised intense excitement.
At no time in the recent history of the city, has a court scene attracted so much attention as did the appearance there today of Edwin Sylvester. Many in the audience were from Plainview, scene of the early success of "E. L.". The majority, however, were residents here who came to get a glimpse of the man who has claimed more newspaper space during the past few days than has any other southeastern Minnesota individual.

February 12, 1926-
Sylvester is Witness Today in Civil Case
Final Chapter in Own Drama Written in Sensational Scene Yesterday
Callaghan Defense Pardon, Parole Boards

May be Taken to Prison Today
(The complete text of Judge Callaghan’s remarks in the Sylvester case will be found on page five. (NOTE: This is not included in this document.))
Rochester, Minn. Feb. 12 – Edwin L. Sylvester was to make his second appearance in two days in the Olmsted county district court room today, but it could not approach in drama and sensationalism the scene of which he was the central figure Thursday afternoon when the final chapter was written in the story which started 11 months ago with his flight just before the sudden closing of the Plainview State Bank.
Thursday he was the defendant sentenced to a term of one to two years in the state prison at Stillwater for one offense of a number with which he is charged for shortages amounting to some $200,000 in the funds of the bank of which he was president. Today he was only a witness in a civil action brought against the bank in connection with a mortgage on the farm of Albert Amos, which was sold to the bank for $3,773.75.
Amid a crowd which packed every nook and corner of the courthouse, fighting for even a glance at the elderly bespectacled ordinary looking figure who seemed almost too insignificant to have created such excitement, Judge C. E. Callaghan pronounced the word which meant that Sylvester must become an inmate of the state prison. The sentence was spoken in a deathlike silence broken only by the sobs of the defendant, which racked him until it seemed that his weakened frame was tried beyond human endurance.
Was Pitiful Scene
It was a pitiful and extraordinary scene which those who were present will not soon forget. Although Sylvester’s eyes filled with tears shortly after his attorney, George W. Peterson of St. Paul stared his plea for leniency, and he wept almost constantly during the entire proceedings, he had apparently regained his composure when he stood up to be sentenced and his complete breaking down came as a surprise. After the judge ended the famous case with the simple word, "I think that will be all," Sylvester was removed in company of his wife and daughter to an anteroom where he received medical attention and was soon restored so that he could be taken to the county jail for the night.
After rest and recuperation in the county jail, he partially recovered his spirits and in speaking of the ordeal which he had undergone declared that he was "glad it was all over with." His collapse had been so complete that he had to be carried bodily from the courtroom and laid on a couch, where he was unconscious for a few moments until restoratives were applied.

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Wife Avoids Stares
When his daughter, Nettie, who was standing nearby, saw her father’s figure waver as he stood before the bar of justice, she stepped close to him, put her arms around his neck and hugged him close to her side so that he would not fall forward on the floor. Father and daughter’s tears mingled together as the judge pronounced the sentence.
Mrs. Sylvester, who was sitting in a chair at the front of the court room, turned her head aside and whispered to her neighbor in the next chair as her husband began to sob. Her only noticeable action during the proceedings was to bow her head on her hand to avoid the stares of the curious who crowded up so close that only a narrow ring was left around the judge’s bench.
Sylvester was expected to leave with the deputy sheriff and Mrs. Sylvester at 4 PM. Mrs. Sylvester however, said her husband is a sick man, and it was declared he will be given medical treatment as soon as he reaches the penitentiary.
The aged Plainview man’s wife said she will accompany her husband to Stillwater and will take an apartment there so she can be near him at all times.
Plan to Dodge Crowds
Sylvester was taken out of his cell this morning to appear as a witness in a case growing out of the closing of the bank of which he was president. For an hour last night Sylvester conferred with C. L. Mikkelson, special examiner in charge of the bank’s affairs, and Senator J. a. Carley of Plainview, Attorney for the bank’s depositors.
Plans are being made today to doge the crowds that besieged the prisoner yesterday and almost trampled Mrs. Sylvester in the rush.
Several old friends called on the prisoner at the county jail this morning. Among them was John Joachim of Plainview, one of the depositors who lost money when the institution failed.
"We’re pretty sorry, E. L." Joachim told Sylvester as they shook hands through the bars.
Crowds of morbidly curious persons waited in the courthouse for nearly an hour after the arraignment hoping for another sight of the defendant and other principals in the case, but they were disappointed. Sylvester did not again come into view and County Attorney John R. Foley, who directed the search and prosecution of the Plainview man, returned to his home at Wabasha directly after the proceedings.
The charge on which Sylvester pleaded guilty was one of receiving a deposit in a bank when he had good reason to believe insolvent, in technical terms, but in the minds of all the onlookers he was arraigned for being principally responsible for the failure of his bank and that was the theory evident in words of the court and the attorneys on either side.
Makes Significant Remarks
Judge Callaghan, who had known Sylvester for many years before the cloud of criminal charges descended upon the former leading citizen of Plainview, had intended to make his part of the proceedings as brief as possible after the pleas of the state and the defense had been heard. He was moved, however, to make some significant remarks about the criticism of the state parole and pardon boards, as a result of mention of the subject of pardon and parole in the attorney’s statements.
He declared that with the circumstances as set before him in this case, he would oppose the commutation of Sylvester’s sentence if petition was made for such action, but intimated that circumstances connected with Sylvester’s later actions in aiding to untangle the bank’s affairs in order to make restitution as far as possible to its depositors, might have some effect on his present attitude.
Criticism of the pardon and parole boards is unjustified, Judge Callaghan declared, as long as the public is willing to sign unthinkingly petitions for mercy and then

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condemn the state boards for taking action to which the petitioners, usually those least interested, have as far as the boards can recognize, recommended.
Would Place Burden on Judges
Abolishment of the state parole boards would place the burden on the judges of the state of determining how long a convicted man should serve, Judge Callaghan asserted, when the judges cannot have complete knowledge of the various circumstances, especially in a case in which a man has pleaded guilty without the introduction of any evidence. He declared his positive opposition to the abolishment of the state boards of parole and pardon and his confidence that there is no danger that the boards will be abolished.
Mr. Peterson, Sylvester’s attorney, began his remarks by saying in the sudden hush which fell upon the assembled crowd, that he was authorized to enter a plea of guilty on behalf of his client.
"I think I have the point of view of the state and I realize the seriousness of the charge," he said, "and I know I have the point of view of the prisoner. I know your honor is sensible in the humanities that speak out in cases of this kind"
Asks Justice with Mercy
"Tomorrow is the birthday of the great Lincoln, who concluded his second inaugural with the great phase of ‘malice toward none and charity for all.’ I am sure your honor in this time of trial to the defendant and his family, will consider the case from the standpoint of the defendant.
"Justice is best administered when tempered with mercy. It is not unfair to the defendant to say that during his 66 years of residence in Wabasha county he has been a good man and a good citizen and I say this in a charitable way.
"The misfortune in this case was occasioned by the inflation and deflation of land values. The defendant in his efforts to save the bank of which he was president, perpetrated irregularities contrary to the penal laws, with the hope of rehabilitating his bank. I feel the wrongs thus committed were not intended to profit himself. It was the chance a business man took to save the institution of which he was head.
Gold Star Parents
"It must be remembered too that Sylvester was a gold star father and Mrs. Sylvester was a gold star mother."
John R. Foley, Wabasha County attorney arose,
"I feel it my duty to tell the court, he said, "that Mr. Sylvester has been president of the bank for 20 years, and that these defalcations commenced prior to the organization of the bank. He has continued for 25 years taking money from one account and then from another, when the land business failed he was not able to make good.
"It is not fair to state that among the depositors are many gold star fathers and gold star mothers. I trust the extent of the sentence will be left to the proper boards."

February 12, 1926-
E. L. Sylvester Received Indeterminate Sentence
Aged Banker Collapses As Sentence is Pronounced
Must Serve From One to Ten Years in State’s Prison
Hearing Held at Rochester Thursday Before Judge Callaghan
E. L. Sylvester collapsed when he received an indeterminate sentence of from one to ten years in Judge Callaghan’s court at Rochester yesterday afternoon on the charge of receiving money from Mrs. Elizabeth Allen when he knew the bank to be insolvent. At Sylvester’s request the hearing was held in district court before Callaghan. He plead guilty to the charge and has agreed to pleat guilty to another indictment. He will be held in Rochester to appear in the Amos case tomorrow before being taken to the State Prison at Stillwater. Mrs. Sylvester was present at the hearing.
A great crowd of Rochester people met the train and were present at the court

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room, the room being full to overflowing. But one Plainview man was present at the hearing.
E. L. Sylvester arrived in Wabasha last Friday evening, alighted from the train amid a crowd of perhaps a hundred people who were curious to see him. He was immediately lodged in the county jail where his first Minnesota cooked meal in 11 months was eaten in the kitchen of the jail. The only Plainview people who were present on his arrival were Senator James A. Carley, counsel for the state banking department, and C. L. Mikkelson, state deputy examiner, both of whom were there to gain what information they could in tracing the tangled bank affairs.
On his arrival Sylvester seemed glad to get back to Minnesota, expressing regret that he had run away. "I should have stayed and faced the music," he said, "but I couldn’t face the people. It would have been better for me and for the bank. I could have saved much which is charged as losses. I am going to do everything I can to help straighten out the bank and I expect to take my punishment. I was too easy. I couldn’t say no when a fellow needed money. My family sent too much but that was my fault too."
In speaking to the affairs of the bank, he said Kennedy, his brother Geo. F. and himself knew what was going on and all knew that a crash was coming. He had planned for three months upon running away. Kennedy had become interested in the bank when a big increase in business was shown by merging the interests of the old Sylvester Bros. bank with that of their incorporated state bank. At that time Kennedy wrote and asked for a place in the bank. Had Kennedy wished, he said, he could have gotten out before he became involved in questionable proceedings. "He was my right hand man. When I was away, Kennedy knew what to do, I could not have done what I did without him. But Kennedy didn’t get any money out of it.
"A few months before the bank closed we had a meeting at night in the bank at which the three of us, Kennedy, Geo. F. and myself, were present. We went over the situation and Kennedy quoted law books to show what the sentence would be for each of us when caught. We all had a regular crying bee."
Sylvester has agreed to appear as a witness in the retrial of the case of Adolph Stoltz at the May term of court.
In his own case Sylvester has agreed to plead guilty to two charges.
Notice of a motion for a new trial in the case of the Plainview State Bank against Harry G. Austin has been served upon Paul J. Strickland of St. Paul, Austin’s attorney. In the November term the bank lost its suit to collect on $5,700 in notes when Austin’s contention that he was paid the interest on the notes and settled them by paying $3,500 in cash was sustained. The motion is asked on the ground of prejudice on the part of the jury and of newly discovered evidence following the capture of E. L. Sylvester. It is understood that Sylvester has denied the payment of the notes and will appear on the stand.
Sylvester’s arraignment was postponed until Thursday of this week to give Examiner Mikkelsen an opportunity to go over the bank records and help straighten them out.
Mrs. Sylvester and daughter, Mrs. Nettie Caldwell, arrived Saturday morning to see the captive banker. Sylvester was called from his conference with Mikkelsen and after a few tears from the ladies, they chatted about family affairs. Mrs. Sylvester stated her intention of remaining in Wabasha to be near her husband as long as he was there.
Except that he is a little thinner, has a light tan and was dressed without particular care for his appearance, Sylvester looks the same as when he left Plainview. He has every appearance of good health and seems to have recovered from his agony of the scared rabbit stage.

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February 12, 1926- Winona Republican-Herald
Sylvester May be Arraigned Again in May
Committee of Plainview Citizens Urge That Other Charges Be Brought Against Former Banker
Foley Ready to Meet Their Demands
Begins Serving Sentence Today
Wabasha Minn. Feb. 13 – Although the prison doors closed behind Edwin L. Sylvester at Stillwater this morning and the "old gray man from Plainview" is now only known by a number, he is not yet through with the criminal charges which resulted from his misdeeds at Plainview.
"They need not petition this county attorney to do his duty," County Attorney John R. Foley of Wabasha county said today when an Associated Press dispatch under a Plainview date line was read to him stating that a citizen’s committee of that place planned to petition that other charges be pressed against the former banker. "When the term of district court arrives Sylvester will be further arraigned if the public demands it," he said.
"Sylvester was arraigned at Rochester Thursday on only one charge," Mr. Foley added, "because that was all the counts on which his attorney would allow him to plead guilty to, and if he was arraigned at that time on all the charges, a delay would have been the result. As it is, he is already in Stillwater serving time and can be brought back here in May to face the other three counts."
Begins Sentence Today
Sylvester was taken from Rochester yesterday afternoon to Stillwater by Deputy Sheriff John Jacobs and lodged last evening in the Washington county jail to await commitment papers which arrived this morning. He was then taken at once to the state prison, where he began serving his sentence today.
There was no crowd at the Rochester station when the party left. Jacobs explained his separation from Sylvester at the railroad station in Rochester when they arrived the other noon as due to the fact that he turned the prisoner over to County Attorney Foley and went ahead to make a way through the milling mass of people to the waiting automobiles for the party.
Want Other Charges Pressed
The Plainview Dispatch follows: Plainview, Minn. Feb. 13 – (AP) – A committee of Plainview citizens has been formed to urge that Edwin L. Sylvester, former banker who began serving an indeterminate sentence in the state penitentiary last night, be re-arraigned on another charge.
Declaring that man widows and children in the vicinity of Plainview are penniless and virtually in want because of the misdeeds of Sylvester, the committee will petition the authorities to have the aged banker brought back to Wabasha county this spring to be arraigned on at least one more of the four counts against him.

February 19, 1926-
Seek Harsher Sentence for Ed. Sylvester
Plainview Citizens Believe He Should Serve More Time
Judge Callaghan Incites Ill Feeling by Decision in the Case
The population of Stillwater prison was increased by one Saturday when E. L. Sylvester took up his residence there following an indeterminate sentence from Judge Callaghan on Thursday when he plead guilty to the charge of embezzlement. Although Sylvester had stated that he would plead guilty to another charge, his attorney would allow but the one charge. As a consequence the other charges will be pressed at the May term of the district court.
Sentiment in Plainview has been outwardly very indifferent in Sylvester’s apprehension, but with the news that only one charge had been presented and that an indeterminate sentence of from one to ten years had been imposed, the underlying determination to make the Plainview bank officers suffer for their crimes came to the

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front. A statement by County Attorney Foley that because of the action of Sylvester’s attorney nothing more could be done at this hearing, and that he would press the other charges in May, quieted the criticism of him and doubt had grown from the misunderstanding of the proceedings. Judge Callaghan has, however, incurred the ill feelings of a great many Plainview people with his address on the Pardon and parole Boards and by stating that he would not interfere with parole proceedings for Sylvester. Plainview people feel that the laws of the state are inadequate to deal with bank robberies such as the one here and that the officers of the law should make every effort to make up for the deficiency. A man who is responsible for the embezzlement of more than $200,000 who has lived in extravagance for 25 years by stealing from friends, widows and orphans should suffer in proportion to the suffering he has caused. In this case such is impossible and the suffering should be continued to the end of the culprit’s days.

February 26, 1926-
Ask New Trial in Austin Suit in this County
Motions for New Trial Will be Heard by Judge Finkelnburg at Winona
Arguments on a motion for a new trial in the case of the Plainview State Bank against Harry Austin, in which the latter was victorious when the suits for collection of a note was tried at Wabasha last November, will be heard by Judge Karl Finkelnburg in district court at Winona Saturday. James A. Carley, attorney for the State Banking department, has asked for a new trial on the ground of newly discovered evidence since the capture of E. L. Sylvester and of an alleged prejudice on the part of the jury. The motion was to have been heard last Saturday, but was later set for February 27th.
The closed bank lost its suit to collect $5,700 in notes from Austin, at the fall term of the district court. Austin was sustained in his contention that he had made settlement for the notes. It is understood that E. L. Sylvester, now serving an indeterminate sentence in Stillwater penitentiary, stated that he never received payment on the note in question. Somewhat sensational disclosures are forecast during the hearing in allegation of prejudice on the part of some of the jurors when they entered the jury box.
E. L. Sylvester Files Petition in Bankruptcy
E. L. Sylvester, former president of the Plainview State Bank, recently sentenced to the penitentiary at Stillwater on a charge in connection with the failing of that institution, has filed a petition in bankruptcy, according to H. M. Bierce, referee in bankruptcy. Hearing on the petition has been set for March 6th.
Hearing on a petition of Mrs. Sylvester, seeking exemption of the homestead and personal property was recently postponed when the husband who had been missing for nearly a year, was found in Gulfport, Miss. According to Mr. Bierce there will be no further appearances in connection with this petition.

March 5, 1926-
Hear Pleas For New Trial in Austin Case
Plainview Bank Attorney Claims Jury Prejudiced in Case
Sylvester’s Capture Makes New Evidence Available, is Said
Decision to be Given Later by Judge Karl Finkelnburg
Arguments on a motion for a new trial, in the case of the Plainview State Bank against H. G. Austin, were heard Saturday by District Judge Karl Finkelnburg. The matter was then taken under advisement.
The case grew out of the failure of the Plainview bank of which E. L. Sylvester was the president. Following the crash the bank brought suit against Austin for the collection of a note given by Austin and claimed to have been unpaid. The jury in the case returned a verdict for the defendant.
A new trial now is being sought by the bank on the grounds that the verdict was not justified by the evidence and that new evidence has been discovered. It also was noticed that the defense set up by Austin at the time of the trial was a surprise to the plaintiff and left him unprepared to meet the issue.

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State Senator James A. Carley represented the bank, declared his arguments that the jury was influenced at the time of the trial by the heat of excitement surrounding the closing of the bank and particularly by one of the jurors who revealed statements following the trial that he was prejudiced against the bank.
The senator pointed out that a story was being circulated at the time of the trial to the effect that immediately preceding his disappearance, Sylvester had gone to the home of a widow in Plainview and had procured from her some $500 and pocketed the funds. The fact in the matter, were Carley said, that the woman had gone to the bank and made a deposit and had received a certificate of deposit.
The new evidence discovered, it is said, is that which would be given by E. L. Sylvester, now serving a term in the state penitentiary at Stillwater. An affidavit signed by Sylvester after his return by authorities from Mississippi, sets forth that Sylvester would testify that the note of Austin had never been paid. It is maintained that Sylvester’s testimony was the only evidence that could have been introduced to offset the statements by Austin in the trial. Since he was out of the state at that time and his whereabouts unknown, it was impossible to produce him. Hs testimony now is available and justified a new trial, it is maintained.
Attorney W. C. Strickland of St. Paul, counsel for Austin, maintained that any testimony Sylvester might give would be impeaching testimony and not new evidence. He further declared that such testimony as he would give, as maintained by the plaintiff, would make him an embezzler and he would hardly be likely to give it.
An affidavit, signed by Strickland himself, set forth that he had clearly indicated the nature of his defense in the answer to the complaint and that a request for more time to prepare the answer of the defendant had been denied by Mr. Carley. It was pointed out to the court that the plaintiff should have demanded a new continuance if he considered that he was unprepared to present the necessary evidence to meet the defense. Failure to do this does not entitle him to a new trial, Mr. Strickland maintained.
Preceding the hearing, Mr. Stickland introduced two motions to strike out of the evidence affidavits of two jurors setting forth what transpired in the juryroom during the jury’s deliberations on the case. The second motion demanded striking out of an affidavit of John J. Jacobs, deputy sheriff, setting forth statements made to him by one of the jurors relative to his views on the case.
It was pointed out that affidavits of jurors are not admissible in evidence in a motion for a new trial. The Jacobs affidavit was declared to be only hearsay evidence.
Both motions were also taken under advisement by Judge Finkelnburg.

March 19, 1926-
A new trial has been granted by Judge Karl Finkelnburg to the Plainview State Bank in its appeal from the adverse verdict of a jury in the suit against Harry G. Austin of Plainview, on the ground of newly discovered evidence available since the capture and imprisonment of E. L. Sylvester, former president of the bank.
The new trial was granted after a hearing held at Winona on Feb. 27, in which Senator James A. Carley, attorney for the defunct bank, made a motion for a new trial on the ground of the new evidence of Sylvester and of prejudice on the part of the jury. Inasmuch as the new trial was granted on the former ground, the court did not consider the latte part of the motion.
In commenting on his decision Judge Finkelnburg declared that he could not agree with counsel for the plaintiff, Paul G. Strickland of St. Paul, that testimony of Sylvester would be of value for impeachment of Austin’s testimony only. On the contrary, he asserted, Sylvester’s testimony would be the only other direct testimony besides

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Austin’s of the transaction in question, if in fact any transaction took place.
Austin’s testimony was characterized by the court as barely sufficient to have warranted a verdict in his favor even though it had been uncontested and his story of "settling" with Sylvester for two notes, totaling $5,700, held by the bank, with $3,500 in cash which he carried at all times in his pockets as "sporting money" for speculative purposes, was termed extremely strange and hardly believable.
The fact that the bank brought the case to trial in the absence of Sylvester was held no ground for denying a new trial, as the court declared that there was no reason at that time to believe his evidence ever would be available, in view of the fact that the bank as well as state and county authorities had failed to locate him despite unremitting efforts.
The case was tried at the fall term of district court at Wabasha and is expected to have its second trial at the coming May term.

April 9, 1926-
E. L. Sylvester Property Here Found Exempt
Land on Two Sides of Homestead Retained by Bank
Decision Made in Bankrupt Case This Week at Winona
The Sylvester homestead and personal property were exempted in the bankruptcy proceedings in a decision given by Referee H. M. Bierce of Winona this week. Proceedings in this case began April 2, 1925, when E. L. Sylvester was declared involuntarily bankrupt. On the petition of Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, claiming her right to the property, a hearing was held at Winona, the trustee, C. L. Mikkelson, through his attorney James A. Carley, presenting his side of the case and the expenditures of the Sylvesters during the past eleven years. The hearing was not completed at that time and after several postponements, E. L. Sylvester was captured and returned to this state where he entered a plea of bankruptcy and Mrs. Sylvester’s claims were dropped. The hearing of the latter petition on March 27 resulted in a decision.
In exempting the homestead, however, the court sets aside only the property on which the residence stands, a lot 72 feet wide, which cuts off the driveway, and extending back 300 feet. The frontage of the property is 252 feet which leaves a strip 96 feet wide and extending back 300 feet on the east side of the house and a strip 84 by 300 feet on the west side besides a garden plot back of the other residences in that block. These two strips have already been sold by Mr. Mikkelson for $2,500 to Matt Schilling.
In pressing the claims for title to the property the banking department in behalf of the depositors cited the fact that most of the property had been purchased with money taken from the depositors of the bank and from trust funds in the bank, arguing that for that reason the property rightfully belonged to the depositors. The same was true of the insurance policies which totaled over $20,000, but as these had been used to secure loans they were of no value. They also claimed that Sylvester was not entitled to protection in this state having left here as an absconding debtor with the intention of establishing a residence outside of the state.
The court’s decision points out that regardless of the circumstances in the case the law allows the exemption of the residence used as the home of the bankrupt and the personal property used by him. The decision expresses sympathy for the depositors but Mr. Bierce states that they must conform to the law and the deficiencies of the law must be taken care of by the legislature.

April 16, 1926-
Sylvester To Face Charges at May Term
Former Plainview Banker to be Brought into Court Again
Will be Returned to Wabasha to Face Additional Charges
Grand Jury to be Summoned – Stoltz Case to be Tried Again
Wabasha Minn. April 10 – Edwin L. Sylvester will be brought back to Wabasha to face additional charges at the May term of district court, county Attorney John R. Foley

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defiantly announced today. The former Plainview banker, now in the state prison at Stillwater, will be arraigned at least on several of the indictments returned by the last May grand jury, whether there would be additional charges or not, Mr. Foley would not discuss.
However, he stated that he had asked Judge C. E. Callaghan, senior judge of the district, to have a grand jury called in for the May term of district court.
Sylvester is now serving a sentence of from one to five years imposed on his plea of guilty to one indictment before Judge Callaghan at Rochester shortly after he was captured at Gulfport, Miss, and returned to Minnesota.
He was taken directly from Rochester to Stillwater. Here in the presence of his attorneys from St. Paul, Sylvester has been in conference several times with the receiver of the Plainview State Bank, of which he was president, and other banking department officials.
"We will bring Sylvester back for the May term of court," Mr. Foley said today, "To face the other charges. At least we are going to exert every effort to bring him back. I prefer not to discuss whether there will or will not be additional charges at this time. You may say, however, that I have asked that a grand jury be impaneled for the May term of court."
Several other important cases are to come before the May term in Wabasha county. The outstanding one is the retrial of Adolph Stoltz of Plainview, former assistant cashier of the closed bank. The jury disagreed at the last term of court in this action.
For sale or rent – G. F. Sylvester residence. Inquire at First National Bank. ADV.

April 23, 1926- E. W. Schwanbeck closed a deal on the G. F. Sylvester residence, where he will make his home.

April 26, 1926-
E. L. Sylvester Property Here Found Exempt
Land on Two Sides of Homestead Retained by Bank
Decision Made in Bankrupt Case This Week at Winona
The Sylvester homestead and personal property were exempted in the bankruptcy proceedings in a decision given by Referee H. M. Bierce of Winona this week. Proceedings in this case began April 2, 1925 when E. L. Sylvester was declared involuntarily bankrupt. On the petition of Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, claiming her right to the property a hearing was held at Winona, the trustee, C. L. Mikkelson, through his attorney James A. Carley, presenting his side of the case and the expenditures of the Sylvester’s during the past eleven years. The hearing was not completed at that time and after several postponements, E. L. Sylvester was captured and returned to this state where he entered a plea of bankruptcy and Mrs. Sylvester’s claims were dropped. The hearing of the latter petition on March 27 resulted in a decision.
In exempting the homestead, however, the court sets aside only the property on which the property stands, a lot 72 feet wide which cuts off the driveway and extending back 300 feet. The frontage of the property is 252 feet which leaves a strip 96 feet wide and extending back 300 feet on the east side of the house and a strip 84 by 300 feet on the west side beside a garden plot back of the other residences in that block. These two strips have already been sold by Mr. Mikkelson for $2,500 to Matt Schilling.
In pressing the claims for title to the property the banking department in behalf of the depositors cited the fact that most of the property had been purchased with money taken from the depositors of the bank and from trust funds in the bank, arguing that for that reason the property rightfully belonged to the depositors. The same was true of the insurance policies which totaled $20,000, but as these had been used to secure loans they were of not value. They also claimed that Sylvester was not entitled to protection in this state having left here as an absconding debtor with the intention of establishing a residence outside the state.

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The court decision points out that regardless of the circumstances in the case the law allows the exemption of the residence used as the home of the bankrupt and the personal property used by him. The decision expresses sympathy for the depositors but Mr. Bierce states that they must conform to the law and the deficiencies of the law must be taken care of by the legislature.

April 30, 1926- W. R. Zabel has purchased the E. L. Sylvester residence and after repairs are made in the place will home his family here from Boyceville, Wis. In the deal for the property about $800 will be turned over to the Plainview State Bank for personal property that was not in the exempt list in the Sylvester bankruptcy proceedings.

May 7, 1926-
Bankers Face 5 Indictments at May Term
Sylvester and Kennedy to Appear at Court Next Week as Witnesses
Retrial of Bank Suit Against H. G. Austin in Civil Case
Stoltz to Be Tried Again – Judge C. E. Callaghan to Preside
Disposal of the remaining indictments against E. L. Sylvester and A. S. Kennedy will be left to the grand jury at the district court session at Wabasha next week, according to County attorney John R. Foley. There are three indictments against the former and two against the later which will be prosecuted or dismissed at the instruction of the jury unless a plea of guilty is entered before that time.
Both officers of the closed Plainview State Bank will appear at this court as witnesses for the state in other cases, one civil and one criminal. The civil case is the retrial of the suit of the bank against H. G. Austin for the payment of $5,700 in notes, in which the defendant was awarded the verdict at the fall term of the court. The criminal case is that of G. A. Stoltz, assistant cashier of the bank who is charged with receiving deposits when he knew the bank to be insolvent. At the fall term the jury could not reach a decision in the case, which occupied the court for nine days.
This term of court will be presided over by Judge C. E. Callaghan. The court calendar contains twenty-two civil cases.

May 14, 1926 – Clipping
Sylvester Gets Five Additional Years in Prison
Former Plainview Bank Head Pleads Guilty to Charge
Weeps as Judge Relates History
One Time "Moneyed" Man of Plainview Must Serve 15 Years
Wabasha, May 14 – A broken down man, Edwin L. Sylvester, once the "moneyed" man of Plainview, the trusted banker, who made and "broke" friends, stood before Judge Charles E. Callaghan here late yesterday afternoon and heard him pronounce a sentence of five years at Stillwater, five years being the maximum which is to be served at the expiration of his present sentence, which he is now in the process of serving, the limit of which term is ten years.
Prosecution of the case moved rapidly following the return of five new counts against the ex-banker, now a prisoner at Stillwater. Sylvester made no effort to fight the case but pleaded guilty to one of the counts returned, that which charged him with making a false statement to the state banking department and from withholding information.
Breaks Down
The man who had made a "mess of things" in Plainview and who had fled the county, only to be arrested down in a little Mississippi village, took things stoically until Judge Callaghan pronounced sentence. As he received the sentence the former official stood with lips tightly closed never faltering until he was rebuked from the bench by the court. It was this rebuke that broke Sylvester and he bowed his head and shed tears.
And it was a sorry and repentant man that left in the driving rain to go back with

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J. R. Finnegan, prison guard to Stillwater where, if he serves his maximum sentence, he will spend the next fifteen years and should he live until that time he will be 82 years old.
Continue Counts
The other four counts, one for first degree grand larceny, to defraud the bank, as its president of approximately $1,500, and the other three for second degree larceny, were continued until the November term of court. The three second degree larceny counts covered private individuals, who lost money. One was for $152,32, another for $60.90 and the third for $30.66, totaling $243.88.
Cheerful when he first arrived, the former official, but now No. 8429 at Stillwater penitentiary, became more sober when the grand jury filed in with the secret indictments in the morning. The crowded court room was hushed as Judge Callaghan looked over the indictments and after a discussion between John R. Foley, Wabasha county attorney, and Harry Peterson, defendant’s counsel, the arraignment was continued until 2 PM.
Listens to Attorneys
When arraigned in the afternoon, the little old man, tired and worn, took his seat in back of his attorney and listened attentively while the attorneys made their preliminary talks.
Attorney Peterson went over the indictments with the court and stated that Sylvester would plead guilty to the count charging the withholding of information from the banking department.
County Attorney Foley then asked the court if evidence should be offered by the state. Judge Callaghan stated that he had handled the case sufficiently to be well informed with all angles and requested Sylvester to stand.
Sylvester arose, and walked near the stand in front of the judge, standing with downcast eyes and folded arms. He was well dressed in a pencil striped blue serge suit and looked as neat as in his best banking days of the past.
Makes Statement
"It is proper," said Judge Callaghan, "that for the felony of making a false statement to the state department and superintendent of banks, and withholding information wanted by that department, that you stand guilty by your own wish and that you be confined at hard labor for an indeterminate term not to exceed five years, to begin at the expiration of the sentence before imposed by the court."
Sylvester bit his lips a little harder and blinked, but refused to look up.
"I just wish to say a few words in connection with the sentence," Judge Callaghan continued.
"You lived in that community for many years. You operated the bank, and the people of that community trusted you. You held their bonds; their property was in your hands; their savings were entrusted to your care. You betrayed that trust.
Misplaced Trust
"The confidence of that town after all these years had been misplaced. It is a sad thing. Many persons were made sorrowful by your unfaithfulness, and the loss was a heavy one for a great many people. It caused the people to lose faith in humanity. When a man betrays his trust, the penalty must necessarily be severe.
Sylvester weakly reached for his face and cried quietly. Then, unable to restrain himself, he buried his face in his arms on the table and sobbed aloud.
Sylvester remained with his head on his arms, sobbing, while the county attorney and Attorney Peterson discussed the remaining counts. Attorney Foley refused to drop the remaining counts, and Judge Callaghan set them over until the November term of court.
Call Witnesses
In the morning grand jury session, many witnesses were called, among them

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Charles Zirbel, of Winona county living near Plainview, who lost nearly all his property and money in the defunct bank, totaling over $10,000.
The grand jury, which had been in session since 2 PM Monday, was dismissed by Judge Callaghan in the morning court session immediately after reporting the Sylvester and two other indictments.
The other two indictments were not made public.
Following his sentence, Sylvester was taken back to Stillwater, accompanied by the guard and his attorney, brining to a close at least temporarily, and perhaps permanently, one of the most exciting cases ever originating in Wabasha County.
From the first, when the bank was found to be insolvent, through the year’s search for Sylvester and his capture at Biloxi, Mississippi, and trial at Rochester to the last stanzas, the people have watched with minute interest.

May 14, 1926-
Former Banker Arraigned On Five New Indictments
E. L. Sylvester Brought Before Grand Jury at Wabasha Yesterday
Civil Cases to Be Disposed of First – Many on Calendar
E. L. Sylvester, who was brought from Stillwater prison yesterday, was arraigned in the district court at Wabasha at 1:30 that afternoon on five new charges brought by the grand jury of this term of court. Following his arrest in February he was arraigned on four indictments returned by the grand jury a year ago. Thus, since he pled guilty to one count, he now faces eight more. One of these he stated he would plead guilty to at the time of his arrest. As the civil calendar will be disposed of first, it is expected that Sylvester will remain in Wabasha during the whole term of court.
The grand jury returned its indictments at 11:45 Thursday morning, including some which will remain secret until the arrests are made…
The retrial of the Austin case was postponed on the motion of Paul Strickland, attorney for Austin, because of improper service of the notice of the new trial. R. L. Rockwell appeared for James A. Carley as attorney for the Plainview State Bank because of Mr. Carley’s illness. The case will be taken up probably at the fall term.
One of the cases taken up Tuesday by the jury was that of School District No. 43, north of Plainview, which is reported to have a shortage of funds amounting to $3,000 growing out of the mixed accounts at the Plainview State Bank.
No further indictments were brought against A. S. Kennedy.
Following the disposal of the civil calendar the retrial of G. A. Stoltz is expected to be the first of the criminal cases…

May 21, 1926-
E. L. Sylvester Gets 5 More Years in Pen
Hopes of Early Freedom Blasted When Judge Gives Sentence
Former Banker Guilty of Charge of Making False Statement
Four Other Charges Will Be Continued to Fall Term of Court
Five years was added to the sentence of E. L. Sylvester in District Court at Wabasha Friday afternoon, when he plead guilty of the charge of making a false statement to the state superintendent of banks. The new five year term will begin at the expiration of the ten year term of which he has now served three months. Sylvester’s attorney, Geo. W. Peterson of St. Paul, moved that the other four indictments be dismissed but through the action of County Attorney Foley they were continued to the November term of court.
In passing the sentence, Judge Callaghan made the following remarks: "You lived in your community for a great many years and acted as adviser and friend to its citizens. The people of Plainview trusted you. You drew their papers and you handled their funds and then – you betrayed their trust.
"Every community needs someone in whom they can confide and when the people learn that their confidence has been betrayed it is a sad thing. Your acts caused sorrow, the loss to a great many but greater than that, acts such as your cause

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thousands of people to lose faith in humanity.
"Every community needs just such a man as they thought you to be. I have thought about this case a great deal and on your plea of guilty to the charge of making a false statement to the state superintendent of banks I sentence you to a term not to exceed five years at hard labor in the state prison. The sentence will begin upon the expiration of the one to ten years heretofore imposed upon you. This in reality, makes a term of 15 years."
Sylvester, who had arrived at Wabasha in fine sprits and health, greeting old friends with a smile and pleasant happy words, broke into sobs which silenced the courtroom when the judge said, "This makes a term of 15 years." It seemed to bring home the realization that the rest of his active life would be spent behind prison bars. If the full term is served Sylvester will be 82 years old when released and then there will be still seven more indictments that may be pressed against him. Sylvester returned to the prison in a very depressed state compared to his jubilant spirits upon arrival in Wabasha the day before.

May 28, 1926-
Retrial of Bank Official Opens at Wabasha Monday
Retrial of the case of G. A. Stoltz began with the selection of a jury on Monday. Tuesday afternoon the jury was completed and witnesses were called. C. L. Mikkelsen, deputy examiner has since occupied the stand. The charge is the receiving of money on deposit when he knew the bank to be insolvent. As in the trial last fall the county attorney is endeavoring to show that there was no such evidence of the solvency of the bank when anyone working in it could not help but know its condition.
Mr. Mikkelsen’s testimony showed that there was a loss of at least $108,500 entailed in the closing of the bank. The inside history of the bank and its financial wrecking is included in Mikkelsen’s testimony. Many of the exhibits of the former trial have been introduced to show that there was considerable variation in the actual conditions and that reported by the bank officials. It is expected that the retrial will occupy as much time as the original trial and that it will occupy the court well into next week.
The specific case is that of receiving a deposit from John L. Boehlke.

June 11, 1926-
Last Curt Chapter in Bank Case; Stoltz is Found Guilty
Last of Three Officers Sentenced to Six Months in Jail or $500 Fine
Jury takes Eighteen Hours to Come to Final Decision
Criminal court proceedings arising from the failure of the Plainview State Bank ended last Friday when the jury returned a verdict of guilty in the retrial of G. A. Stoltz, former assistant cashier of the closed institution. Judge Callaghan sentenced Stoltz to a fine of $500, giving him ten days to raise the money. In case of default at that time the former banker would have to serve six months in jail.
The case has occupied eight days. Half a day was used by the attorneys in their final arguments and the jury took eighteen hours to make their decision. The whole bank situation was practically the same as in the November trail. The prosecuting attorney, John R. Foley, showing the erratic bookkeeping and juggling of accounts to be such that a man in Stoltz’s position could not help but have known that the bank was insolvent. The defense presented the situation in Plainview and the confidence placed in the bank, endeavoring to bring out the fact that Stoltz’s minor position left him in the same position as the other people in the community.
Following the imposition of the sentence, County Attorney Foley told the court that he was satisfied that justice had been done and moved that the other two indictments against Stoltz be dismissed. The court dismissed the indictments.

June 18, 1926- Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Sylvester spent a few days in St. Paul this week. Mr. Sylvester attending the Grand Lodge of the Encampment and Mrs. Sylvester visiting the Paul Durgin and Theodore Peter’s homes.

August 6, 1926-
$125,892 Suit Filed Against E. L. Sylvester

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Local Bank Claim is Made Against $6,360 in Bankrupt Estate

May Aid Many Depositors Who Suffered When Institution Crashed
A claim of $125,892.88 against the estate of Edwin L. Sylvester was filed by the Plainview State Bank in United States court in Winona Thursday.
The banking department in filing the claim states that this amount is due to the bank as a result of misappropriation of funds on the part of the former president, now serving time at Stillwater. The claim was filed by C. L. Mikkelsen, examiner in charge.
The final report of the trustee of the E. L. Sylvester bankruptcy shows that the assets of the estate are $6,360.65. This is the amount accumulated from the sale of the Sylvester property, not exempt under the bankruptcy laws.
Hearing on the large claim of the banking department will be held before H. M. Bierce, referee in bankruptcy at 10 AM, August 21. The banking department will be required to show the nature of the claim and its source.
At that time it is likely that the final settlement in the case will be made, which will conclude the famous Sylvester case in another court.
The filing of the banking department’s claim was considered a surprise in court circles. If successful, it will add nearly $5,000 to the sum the depositors of the bank will receive on their claims.

November 19, 1926- Fall Term District Court in Session at County Seat… one is an appeal from the municipal court and one is a new trial of the case of Plainview State Bank against Harry G. Austin. Two cases have been instituted against A. J. Veigel, state banking commissioner, growing out of the closing of the bank…
In the Austin case, the Plainview State Bank is suing Harry G. Austin to collect on alleged unpaid notes which he claimed paid. On December 1st last year at the November term of court, a jury returned a verdict in favor of Austin in the first trial of the case.
A short time later E. L. Sylvester, president of the bank, was captured in Mississippi and Judge Karl Finkelnberg ordered a retrial on the basis of new evidence gained in the apprehension of the missing man. At the May term of court, however, the case was ordered stricken from the calendar by the late Judge Charles E. Callaghan because of improper service of notice for the new trial. Officials of the banking department claim the notice on a new trial of the case will take place at the present term of court…

December 2, 1926-
Former Plainview Bankers Appear in Wabasha Court
E. L. Sylvester and A. S. Kennedy Brought to County Seat
As Witnesses in Bank Case
Plainview State Bank is Suing H. G. Austin
After deliberating three quarters of an hour yesterday afternoon the jury returned a verdict in favor of the Plainview State Bank in its suit against H. G. Austin for the collection of a $5,700 note. The case was called at 10 AM Wednesday. Sylvester and Kennedy were called to the stand yesterday. The case was the last to be taken up at this term of court.
Local interest was centered in district court proceedings at Wabasha this week when E. L. Sylvester and A. S. Kennedy were brought from the Stillwater prison Monday to appear as witnesses for the state in the suit of the Plainview State Bank against Harry G. Austin for the recovery of a $5,700 note. The former officers of the Plainview State Bank were brought down in an automobile by prison guards and will be lodged in the county jail during their stay in their home country. They have been visited by several local people who say that prison life seems to agree with both men and they appear to be in fine health.
This is Sylvester’s third appearance in court since his arrest in Gulfport, Mississippi, last February. On his first appearance he was sentenced to an indeterminate term not to exceed ten years and on the second to a like term not to exceed five years

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to be served at the expiration of the first term. He has served about nine months of his term. Kennedy has not been back since he was sentenced from one to ten years which term he began just a year ago.
Their appearance in the local court was occasioned at the request of James A. Carley, attorney for the closed bank on a court order issued by Judge Karl Finkelnberg. This case has been brought up for retrial from the November term of last year at which time Austin was given the verdict on a plea that he had settled the note by paying E. L. Sylvester $3,500 in cash. With the apprehension of Sylvester, Carley asked for a new trial on the grounds of additional evidence. The case was thrown out of the calendar at the May term because of improper filing of the notice and postponed to the November term. The case was expected to come before the court on Wednesday. A number of local people have been present at the proceedings and more will attend until the trial is over.

=== [ 1930 ] ===

June 6, 1930-
E. L. Sylvester Buried Thursday
Died at St. Paul Hospital Wednesday – Remains Brought Here
Word was received here Wednesday of the death of Edwin L. Sylvester at a St. Paul hospital that morning. It was known that his health was failing rapidly and in the past few weeks local people had heard that his condition was such that he could not last long. He had been under hospital care for the past two months, a parole having been granted to permit him to be taken to St. Paul. The body was brought here Thursday afternoon for burial at Greenwood Cemetery with private services.
Mr. Sylvester was born in Plainview township March 16, 1859 his father coming from Wisconsin and settling on the farm in 1855. He attended the district school and three years at the Plainview High School. He taught school for two years spending his spare time working on his father’s farm. In 1882 he became clerk in the Plainview State Bank, becoming president of the institution in 1905. In 1906 it was incorporated as a State Bank and was the oldest bank in the county having been established in 1865.
The story of his life from then on needs no recounting. The failure of the bank in 1925was occasion for telling that story many times. After evading the law for a year, he was sentenced to 15 years in Stillwater Prison.
Deceased was married November 22, 1855 to Hettie L. Dillon. They were the parents of 5 children, one son Byrl E. having been killed ring the War. The surviving children are Mrs. Nettie Caldwell of St. Paul, Mrs. Meta Larsen, Minneapolis, Park of Plainview and Edwin of Chicago. This death stirs again the memory of this community of a man who was one of Plainview’s most prominent citizens. His personality was one that all will be pleased to remember. The bank failure brought out facts that took the community a long time to realize their impact because of the regard in which he had been held. These facts showed a weakness from which he has not been excused but there is a feeling among those who were his friends that he was a victim of circumstances that have not been disclosed.

=== [ 1934 ] ===

January 5, 1934-
Funeral Services Conducted Sunday for P. D. Sylvester
Passed Away Last Thursday After Being Struck by Hit-Run Motorist
Was in Hospital for one Week
Was Well Known, Prominent in Community Affairs
The life of Park Sylvester expired on Thursday December 28 at the General Hospital at Virginia, Minnesota where he had been taken just a week previous, following

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an automobile accident which badly crushed his body. With other members of the camp, he had returned from town where he had secured transportation to come home for Christmas. While alighting from the truck at the camp a passing motorist struck Mr. Sylvester, who was the first man to leave the vehicle. The impact broke one leg, crushed his chest, fractured several ribs, injured his head and cut his face and head. Rushed to the hospital, little hope was extended for his recovery and when pneumonia set in he was given only hours to live. Mrs. Sylvester, who had planned to meet him a Wabasha on Friday, was informed of the accident and summoned to his bedside. With the assistance of members of the American Legion and Auxiliary of Virginia and members and officers of the camp, everything was done to relieve the pain and sorrow.
Park Dillon Sylvester was born in Plainview on August 8, 1889, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Sylvester. He attended the local school and grew to manhood here. In 1907 he married Ruby Lillie and a few years later went to Canada. He returned to Plainview after a few years where he has since made his home.
In the World War, Mr. Sylvester enlisted at North Platte, Nebraska on February 21, 1918. His service carried him to France where he served for two months at the battle front. In that service he participated in the battles on the Marbach sector, the St. Mihiel offensive and the Meuse Argonne offensive. At the close of the war he returned to Camp Upton, N.Y. where he was discharged May 17, 1919. On the following day he reenlisted and served another year receiving his second honorable discharge at Camp Upton on May 17, 1920.
Returning to Plainview, he continued his home here. He married Ethel Nunamaker October 1, 1923. In recent years he was employed at the Askew Store for sometime. He then took up electrical work. He joined the Veteran Conservation Corps on July 1, 1933 and was stationed at Ft. Snelling for two weeks. The company then went to Virginia where they opened camp about 30 miles from there were he has since been employed.
He was a member of Plainview Lodge No. 16 I.O.O.F. and was past Noble Grand; a member of Greenwood Encampment and Past Chief Patriarch; a member of William Allen Post American Legion and a Past Commander; a member of the Wabasha County Veterans of Foreign Wars and an interested worker in that organization.
The papers of his discharge designate his character as honest and faithful with no AWOL. These few words express the character by which he was known to his many friends in and near Plainview. They could be enlarged upon to a large extent but in the end those wards are very expressions. The entire community was saddened by this untimely death and greatly sympathize with the family in their loss.
Mr. Sylvester is survived by his wife, one daughter Mrs. Robert Fischer of Maple Springs, Idaho, by his first marriage, two step sons at home, his mother Mrs. E. L. Sylvester of Minneapolis, 2 sisters – Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of St. Paul and Mrs. Roy M. Larsen of Minneapolis, and one brother Edwin of Minneapolis. One brother, Byrl, died June 19, 1918 and his father June 4, 1930.
Funeral services were held at the Church of Christ Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. D. E. Donaldson. The American Legion, with color guard and firing squad in uniform, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the I.O.F.F. Lodge attended the service in rites at the grave. Members of the Wabasha County V.F.W. acted as pallbearers. They were Harry Hawkinson, Alfred Berkins, Geo. Heise of Zumbro Falls, Jack Almeter of Mazeppa, Lloyd B. Johnson and Fred Tarbouckle of Lake City. Burial was made in Greenwood cemetery.
Members of the family from away who attended the funeral were Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, Mrs. Roy M. Larsen, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Sylvester of Minneapolis, Mrs. J. P. Caldwell of St. Paul with a number of members of the I.O.O.F., Legion and VFW from

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Wabasha, Elgin, Kellogg and Lake City
Sylvester Accident in Virginia Newspaper
Details of Hit and Run Death
Recorded by Iron Range Newspaper
The Virginia paper of last week contains the following report in connection with the accident in which Park Sylvester was killed.
"Police today announced that Lyle Doane, Virginia, had confessed that he was the driver of the automobile that sped away without stopping after striking Park Sylvester, member of the Veteran Conservation Camp at Sandy Lake. Joseph Cook, said to have been Doane’s companion, also is being held.
"The youth is said to have admitted that he stole his father’s car and that the accident occurred while they were returning from the Doane farm north of Sandy Lake. After striking Sylvester, he continued on towards Virginia and let Cook off at a hospital to receive treatment for cuts about the face from flying glass suffered when the car windshield shattered by the impact.
"After dropping Cook off, Doane allegedly made his way through dark sidestreets and alleys, abandoning the machine near some ore dumps and then returned home, notifying his mother that the car had been stolen. He also set the clocks in the house back half an hour.
"Police said that Doane is now under 3 years parole from Federal District County for burglarizing of the Parkville Post Office and that the period is not yet completed. They said that Doane had also served time in the boys reformatory at St. Cloud for burglary.
"Doane is said to have told authorities that he did not stop after the accident because of the parole, fearful that it might be taken from him. The youth is also said to have admitted that he and Cook had been drinking at the farm prior to the crash. been disclosed.

=== [ 1935 ] ===

June 14, 1935-
Mrs. Roy Larson
Mrs. Roy Larson of Minneapolis, formerly Miss Meta Sylvester of Plainview, died at Asbury Hospital last Sunday following a 10 day’s illness. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday.
Mrs. Larson was 46 years old. She married Roy L. Holmes. Three children were born to them. For the past 15 years she has lived in Minneapolis and a few years ago married Mr. Larson.
Surviving are her husband, two sons, Lieut. M. S. Holmes & John, and a daughter Hettie Marie, her mother, Mrs. E. L. Sylvester, a sister Mrs. J. P. Caldwell, St. Paul, and a brother Edwin, Madison, Wisconsin.

=== [ 1942 ] ===

May 29, 1942-
Former Resident Dies in Illinois
Friends here were grieved to hear of the death of Anna Sylvester Baker on May 17.
Anna Sylvester was born in Milaca, Minnesota on February 7, 1890. Later she attended and graduated from the Plainview, Minnesota High School. She also attended Thomas Normal at Detroit and Oberlin College at Oberlin.
In 1908 she became the bride of Rodney Baker. They lived for the past 12 years in Moline, Ill. until she died May 17, 1942 of a cerebral hemorrhage. Relatives and friends were shocked to hear of her death since she had been feeling quite well for the past several months.
Mrs. Baker is survived by her husband, R. J. Baker, two sisters, Katherine Sylvester of Bittendorf, Ia., and Mrs. Lloyd Jewell of Detroit, Mich, and her mother, Mrs.

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Catherine Sylvester also of Detroit.

=== [ 1945 ] ===

January 5, 1945-
Mrs. Catherine Sylvester in Detroit, Mich. Passed Away on December 20
Mrs. Catherine M. Sylvester died very suddenly on December 20 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lloyd V. Jewell of Detroit, Mich. Her death was due to a stroke. She had completely recovered from two major operations which she had undergone in the past year and her death came very unexpectedly.
Mrs. Sylvester has made her home with her daughter, Marion, and family since the death of her husband, George F. Sylvester in 1924. They have lived in Detroit for the past 16 years.
Catherine M. Whilt was born in Benton Co. in 1869, the first white child born in that county. She was married to George Franklin Sylvester on January 1, 1886. After her marriage she took up and learned the art of telegraphy under her husband, who was the station agent at Milaca, completely handling the business pertaining to 30 trains a day. In 1897 they moved to Plainview where Mr. Sylvester became associated with his brother Edwin in the Plainview Bank.
Five children were born to them: Leon C., Anna S., Beatrice, Katherine S., and Marion F. Surviving are two daughters, Katherine S. of Chicago and Marion F. Jewell, and 2 sons-in-law Rodney J. Baker, husband of the late Anna S. Sylvester and Lloyd V. Jewell, husband of Marion and two grandchildren William S. Jewell and Kathe Lee Jewell.

November 9, 1945-
Mrs. Hettie Sylvester Buried Here Tuesday
The body of Mrs. Hettie Sylvester, who died Saturday in Minneapolis, was sent to Plainview for burial on Tuesday.
Mrs. Sylvester was born at St. Lawrence, N.Y. April 6, 1863 and came to Plainview when a small child. On November 22, 1885 she became the wife of Edwin L. Sylvester. She was prominent in church and lodge work and was a charter member of the Travelers Club. The family left Plainview about 1924 and for some time she has been a resident of the Soldiers Home in Minneapolis.

=== [ 1979 ] ===

April 12, 1979-
Mrs. Ethel Sylvester, 86
Mrs. Ethel Sylvester of Plainview, a former Plainview practical nurse and telephone operator, died Saturday April 8 in the nursing home of St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Wabasha.
The former Ethel Arnold, she was born December 14, 1892 in Brownsdale, Minnesota and reared in St. Charles. She married Ray Nunamaker in 1912 and they were later divorced. In 1923 she married Park Sylvester and he died in 1933. She was employed as a telephone operator in Plainview for 18 years and also was a practical nurse in Plainview for most of her life.
Survivors include a son, Kenneth Nunamaker of Chino, California, 2 step daughters Mrs. Alfred Wood of Plainview and Elizabeth Nunamaker of Wabasha, 3 grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren, a sister Mrs. Claude (Carrie) Crary of Plainview and a brother Lloyd Arnold of Wabasha. She was also preceded in death by a son and 2 sisters. The funeral was held Tuesday April 10 at Plainview Church of Christ, with Roger Arnett officiating. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery in Plainview.

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=== [ 1983 ] ===

June 7, 1983-
Ruby Wambacher (NOTE: Park Sylvester’s first wife)
Ruby E. Wambacher, 94, a former Plainview resident died Thursday May 5 at the Manor Convalescent Center in Sandpoint (Idaho). Ruby was born on April 17, 1889 in Elgin to Margaret and Samuel Lillie. She attended school in Plainview where she was valedictorian of the graduating class after which she took the normal school test. She married Park Sylvester in 1907 in Minnesota. She then taught school for three years in Alberta, Canada. Later in 1921 she married Fred Mason in Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. They moved to Idaho to the Bonners Ferry area in 1926. They farmed there before moving to a small farm on the beach. Fred preceded her in death in 1959 and then she moved to Bonners Ferry in the fall of that year. In 1963 she married Ray Wambacher in Bonners Ferry.
She had resided in Bonners Ferry until 1982 when she moved to the Sandpoint Manner. Ruby was very active in the community. She was a member of the United Methodist Church and won many prizes and awards for her tatting and rug making.
She is survived by one daughter Lois Fisher of Hope; on sister Avis Davidson of Penticton, B.C., two grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Monday May 5, at the United Methodist Church with Rev. Bill Green officiating. Burial followed in the Grandview Cemetery.


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