An Obscure Gettysburg

On February 7, 2013 · 5 Comments

This is the story of John Kennedy. No, not that John Kennedy! I’m referring to John Wright Kennedy who I guarantee you know nothing about, nor should you. It’s about how a formative event in his life resulting in the naming of a town twenty years later. He was a farmer who underwent a harrowing ordeal, lived to tell about it, who went back to a quiet agrarian life and survived to a ripe old age.

Tangentially, I suppose it’s also about the huge paper trails we leave behind since every bit of information I discovered for this story I found online in less than an hour. If I could learn this much about someone who passed away nearly a century ago, imagine how much people will find out about you and I a hundred years from now in our digital wakes.

Mr. Kennedy was born in Stamford, New York (map), on April 18, 1838, a child of Scottish immigrants as the census records describe it. This put him at a prefect age to serve in the military when the U.S. Civil War broke out in 1861. Stamford straddled the line between Delaware and Schoharie Counties, and he joined many of his neighbors when they enrolled in the Union Army in nearby Schenectady to form Co. F of the 134th New York Infantry on August 22, 1862. He mustered in as a Private and worked his way up to Sergeant, then was commissioned as a Lieutenant and eventually gained a promotion to Captain.



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The regiment was attached to XI Corps of Army of the Potomac, a corps best remembered for its role in the Battles of Chancellorsville in Virginia and Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, in mid-1863, and in not an entirely flattering light. The Eleventh Corps was caught unprepared at Chancellorsville and was routed on the first day of Gettysburg, retreating through the streets of the town before reaching the high ground of Cemetery Hill. They redeemed themselves somewhat on the second day with a valiant defense of the hill, although XI Corps never truly recovered its reputation and was later dismantled and spread amongst other units. The 134th New York was in the thick of the battle at Gettysburg and lost 42 killed 141 wounded and 59 missing. This put 242 of the regiment’s 400 soldiers out of action in a single battle.



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The 134th New York monument at Gettysburg in the distance. See photo.

John Kennedy never make it to Cemetery Hill. He became one of the 59 missing on July 1, 1863. It turned out he was captured by the Confederate army on the first day at Gettysburg. He became a prisoner of war and was moved to Richmond, Virginia. The story didn’t end there, however. Kennedy escaped imprisonment and rejoined his unit in Savannah, Georgia in December 1864. He then served in the Union army for the remainder of the war, finally mustering out with his company on June 10, 1865.

He relocated to South Dakota sometime after the war, establishing a home and a farm in Potter County. Others moved to the area and it was time to form a town. They needed a name for their new settlement. As Genealogy Trails explains,

The group [of Civil War veterans] sought to name the new town Meade in honor of General Meade, renowned for his leadership in the Battle of Gettysburg. When the Post Office rejected that name because it was already too popular, Captain John W. Kennedy, a member of Gen. Howard’s 11th Corps during the Battle of Gettysburg, submitted the name Gettysburg instead. That was accepted.



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Gettysburg, South Dakota has more than 1,100 residents today and is the seat of government for Potter County. In 1991, the two Gettysburg towns became "sister cities." Kennedy passed away on February 13, 1918, in Gettysburg — the one in South Dakota — and was buried there. His tombstone noted that he fought at Gettysburg.

I can’t think of any other town named explicitly to commemorate a battle, by a veteran of the battle. I hope I can discover others.

On February 7, 2013 · 5 Comments

5 Responses to “An Obscure Gettysburg”

  1. Here in British Columbia, we have Merville, named by veterans who settled in the Comox Valley after World War I after the location of the first Canadian field headquarters in France. There are plenty of other places named after battles here, of course, but none by veterans who were there themselves, so Merville is the only BC candidate.

  2. Fritz Keppler says:

    In the middle of a cornfield just a little southwest of the town center but within view of the grain elevators one can stand at the confluence of 45°N and 100°w, halfway between the poles and where the West begins.

    http://www.confluence.org/confluence.php?lat=45&lon=-100

  3. Peter says:

    The group [of Civil War veterans] sought to name the new town Meade in honor of General Meade, renowned for his leadership in the Battle of Gettysburg. When the Post Office rejected that name because it was already too popular, Captain John W. Kennedy, a member of Gen. Howard’s 11th Corps during the Battle of Gettysburg, submitted the name Gettysburg instead.

    Oddly enough, there are only a handful of mostly small communities and counties named Meade. It’s hard to see how it could have been deemed “too popular.”
    Several years after Captain Kennedy’s failed attempt to name the new town Meade, a new county in western South Dakota got that moniker.

  4. John of Sydney says:

    Hi
    The district called the Granite Belt in south east Queensland has two towns named after World War One battles – Pozieres and Amiens. Pozieres was the scene of a very bloody battle in 1916 where Australian and British forces took the town back from the advancing German army. There is a prominent Australian War Memorial there which I am proud to say I have visited.
    Returning soldiers were given land to establish farms throughout the country and I conjecture that veterans of Pozieres and Amiens were settlers in the Granite Belt.
    There is also a Passchendale State Forest nearby – I assume it is named for the same reason.
    Keep up the good work – I always find your site interesting even though most of the stuff is very remote from me.
    John

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