Nimby Lane

On May 13, 2015 · 2 Comments

Twelve Mile Circle has an international audience so I’m never sure whether a term that’s part of my lexicon translates geographically. Many readers probably know the term NIMBY. For the rest of you, and particularly the foreign-language readers, NIMBY is an acronym for "Not In My Back Yard." As defined by Dictionary.com NIMBY is…

…used to express opposition by local citizens to the locating in their neighborhood of a civic project, as a jail, garbage dump, or drug rehabilitation center, that, though needed by the larger community, is considered unsightly, dangerous, or likely to lead to decreased property values.

The term has become somewhat of a personal inside joke during my formulation of articles for 12MC. I’ve attempted to write a NIMBY story for years and I always get about fifteen minutes into it before dropping it. I can never seem to make it flow well. Maybe I’ll write that article someday although for today I’m going to punt once again and take a slightly different twist on the topic.


Nimby Lane



Nimby Lane, Jackson, Pennsylvania, USA

Instead of providing examples of NIMBY behavior I thought I’d focus on a few people who live on streets named Nimby. These had to be some rather special residents as I thought about it, who acknowledged their passive-aggressive behavior with a healthy dose of irony. Good for them! What’s the expression? — something about the first step in solving a problem is accepting that one has a problem?

First I discovered Nimby Lane in Pennsylvania. It was funny because a humongous 4-lane highway was in the figurative backyard. I wondered if the residents had fought the battle and lost or were collectively thumbing their noses at other nearby people who had fought and lost. It was quite the paradox, and of course 12MC loves a good paradox.

I noticed an odd little map symbol just to the west; I wasn’t sure if it was a person kneeling in prayer or a tabletop microscope. Was it a place of worship or a laboratory? It took some digging on OpenStreetMap to confirm that it was indeed a place of worship. Some additional searching determined that this was the site of the Chickaree Union Church, "The Jesus Saves Church" That led me to wonder when one would use a Christian cross symbol versus a person kneeling in prayer. I know we have some OpenStreetMap contributors in the audience. Perhaps one of them could enlighten us.

The name of the highway also provided a tantalizing point of trivia since we’ve already veered along an unrelated tangent once again. It’s not difficult to derail me. It was labeled US Route 22, the Admiral Peary Highway. That seemed like an odd choice.


Robert Edwin Peary
Robert Edwin Peary via Wikimedia Commons in the public domain

Admiral Robert Edwin Peary was an Arctic explorer who was credited with leading the first expedition to the North Pole in 1909. Later research showed that he probably missed it by quite a few miles although he certainly garnered significant fame during his lifetime for his achievement. He was born in Cresson, Pennsylvania. That was less than 20 miles away from Nimby Lane. Clearly a lot more had happened in Nimby Lane’s back yard than met the eye.


Nimby Drive



Nimby Dr., Savannah, Georgia, USA

Nimby Drive in Georgia seemed less clear-cut. It was located within a nascent golf course community at The Club at Savannah Harbor. Actually I wondered if it might have been nothing more than a cute placeholder name. The residential area, at least on the most recent satellite view, seemed to be in the early stages of development with a street grid and very few houses. It was funny because the back yard was a golf course and usually people like golf courses in their back yard. In fact I think that houses in golf course communities commanded premium prices? Maybe it referred to golf balls, as in it might be nice to live near a course except for the places where a wicked slice could send something crashing through a window.


Sam Snead hanging out in Savannah
Sam Snead hanging out in Savannah by Jesse Hirsh, on Flickr (cc)

The Club at Savannah included a bust commemorating golfer Sam Snead. I wondered if there might have been a local connection like I’d observed with Admiral Peary in Pennsylvania. Nope. Snead was born in Virginia and died in Virginia. Apparently it was simply a tribute to a legendary golfer instead of a local connection. Snead was not in their back yard.


Australia



Nimby Place, Cooma, NSW, Australia

I found a couple of Nimby Roads in New South Wales, Australia. I’ll have to defer to the Australian readers to determine if NIMBY is actually a thing there or not. I got the distinct feeling that neither road referred to the acronym, though. They were found in areas where roads carried aboriginal terms so it probably meant something innocuous in a native language like "pleasant view". I could be completely wrong though. I made that up.

The Nimby Road in Cooma actually had a rather lovely backyard, the Cooma North Ridge Reserve:

The North Ridge Reserve area on the edge of Cooma comprises approximately 80 hectares which was a consolidation of a Crown Land Reserve and land purchased by the Council from the Snowy Mountains Hydro-electric Authority in 1996. The area is home to many native animals and flora and is a favourite area for the many people who enjoy bushwalking.

I would think that just about anyone would want that in their backyard.

There was another Nimby Road near Harden (map). The two Nimby spots were only about a three hour drive apart via Canberra. That might make a nice weekend trip for readers in New South Wales.

On May 13, 2015 · 2 Comments

2 Responses to “Nimby Lane”

  1. John of Sydney says:

    The placenames of Australia site has three entries for Nimby- a hill, a creek and a trig station all just south of Harden. That region is the home of the Winadyuri people who language was almost extinct but is making a comeback. Couldn’t find a meaning for Nimby but I would expect it has some ordinary descriptive meaning like you suggested.
    The use at Cooma is most probably just an attempt to create an area with aboriginal names.
    The drive from Cooma to Harden would be very nice but I’d allow a bit more than three hours to really enjoy it.
    In simpler times the name Harden was the source of crude jokes referring to shall we say weiner erection.
    The most common use of Nimby down here is the same as yours. There is the other term: NODAM – no development after mine.

  2. Mr Burns says:

    As it happens, I have a friend from Australia visiting me this week. I just now asked him about the word, which he thought was a strange thing to ask, but he’s too polite to say so. He says basically what John of Sydney says … “heard of it, but it’s not a common part of our vernacular.”

    (I know, comments which basically repeat things said in previous comments are a pain, but it was too convenient having an Australian here for me to let it slip by!)

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