Where They Lived as Children

On August 30, 2015 · 2 Comments

My recent trip to western North Carolina was like the gift that kept on giving of Twelve Mile Circle article ideas. Sadly I’ve reached the end of the line on that thread so this will be the last article that contains a connection to that earlier adventure. As noted in a prior installment, I enjoyed walking around Asheville in the early morning before the town woke up. I discovered all sorts of interesting nooks as I wandered aimlessly down deserted streets. One was the Thomas Wolfe House on Spruce Street, included as part of the museum complex at 52 N. Market Street (map).


Thomas Wolfe Memorial
Thomas Wolfe Memorial (my own photo)

This inviting structure has been designated as the Thomas Wolfe Memorial State Historic Site, the childhood home of the author. The Queen Anne style home served as a boardinghouse operated by Wolfe’s mother. He used it as a backdrop for his thinly veiled 1929 autobiographical novel, "Look Homeward, Angel." That distinction certainly made it a property worth preserving. It occurred to me that oftentimes a famous person’s adult home might be preserved while his or her childhood home might be neglected, with notable exceptions of course. Certainly preservation made sense here.


Mark Twain


Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum Properties
Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum Properties by Missouri Division of Tourism (cc)

Another place where I thought preservation made sense was the Mark Twain Boyhood Home at 206-208 Hill Street, in Hannibal, Missouri (map). Samuel Clemens, a.k.a. Mark Twain, drew upon his youthful memories from Hannibal for some of his novels. These included actual locations associated with people who inspired major fictional characters such as Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and Becky Thatcher.

That was all fine and appropriate. However I wanted to bring the concept into the present. I wondered if there were people of more recent vintage whose childhood homes might someday become national historic landmarks. Where would tourists flock and stand in line to walk through rooms where a notable person once lived as a child? The big one of course was Elvis Presley, and for him that distinction had already been achieved. I wrote about Elvis’ early childhood shotgun-shack in Tupelo, Mississippi in The Cult of Elvis back in 2009. After Elvis, then the next logical choice might have to be…


Michael Jackson


Michael Jackson first house
Michael Jackson first house by Paolo Rosa on Flicker (cc)

What would be a bigger Thriller than driving down to the corner of 23rd and Jackson Street in Gary, Indiana (map)? The Michael Jackson house probably stood a solid chance of becoming an historic landmark to rival anything from Elvis. It already seemed to be generating cult-like status barely five years after Jackson’s death judging by the numerous photos I saw on the Intertubes. Invariably images showed throngs of people, piles of tributes, a large granite marker and a generally celebratory environment courtesy of pilgrims and devotee that converged there.

Another question remained. Will tourists ever be able to visit Neverland Ranch like they can Graceland?


Kurt Cobain


Kurt Cobain's Childhood Home
Kurt Cobain’s Childhood Home; Aberdeen, WA
via Google Street View, October 2012

I moved on to another music icon, albeit from a different genre. Kurt Cobain passed away at the height of success while fronting the band Nirvana, in 1994. One would think that his childhood home might attract the attention of some of his fans, and yet it didn’t seem to resonate much. The real estate website Redfin featured his mother’s property at 1210 East 1st St., Aberdeen, Washington (map) in August 2015, "Kurt Cobain’s Childhood Home Drops in Price, Again."

Kurt Cobain’s mother, Wendy O’Connor, just shaved off $71,000 from the price of his childhood home, bringing the new price tag to $329,000… His bedroom, which looks like a converted attic, still has Iron Maiden and Led Zeppelin logos that he stenciled on the walls, and holes from where he punched the walls as a teen.

It would seem to demonstrate great provenance and even some residual historic significance given the doodles and damage. It remained unsold as of a few days ago.


Sandra Bullock


Sandra Bullock's Childhood Home
Sandra Bullock’s Childhood Home; Arlington, VA
via Google Street View, July 2014

A childhood home might have historical significance even if the celebrity who lived there happened to still be living, right? I selected Sandra Bullock solely because she lived fairly close to where I live today in Arlington, Virginia. In fact my children will someday attend the same high school that she attended during her formative years, Washington-Lee. Bullock spent most of her childhood at 2925 26th Street North in the Woodmont neighborhood (map). The Arlington County property search website valued the home at $1,241,900 for the 2015 tax year. It also noted that "Bullock John W & Helga M" purchased the property originally in 1966 for $40,000 (and it sold for $1,115,000 in 2005).

Kurt Cobain’s childhood home would be a lot more cost effective for, you know, creepy people who need to own one of those kinds of places.

On August 30, 2015 · 2 Comments

2 Responses to “Where They Lived as Children”

  1. Peter says:

    Although Compton has become almost synonymous with violence and drugs and gangs, as witnessed by the recent movie, for a period of about six months in 1949 it was the home of two future presidents, George H.W. Bush and the toddler George W. Bush. The apartment building where they lived is long gone.

  2. Fritz Keppler says:

    Somewhat between the older and newer homes which you mention. One house in the Dominion Hills section of Arlington where I live is the childhood home of Shirley Maclaine and Warren Beatty. It’s privately owned, but the exterior is of course visible from the street.

    http://www.walkarlington.com/pages/walkabouts/dominion-hills/

    Also, the girlhood home of Judy Garland in Grand Rapids MN is open to the public.

    http://www.judygarlandmuseum.com/

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